Speeches (Lines) for First Senator in "The Tragedy of Coriolanus"

Total: 33
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 1
  • CORIOLANUS, 'tis true that you have lately told us;
    The Volsces are in arms....
  • CORIOLANUS, 'tis true that you have lately told us;
    The Volsces are in arms.
  • Coriolanus. I am glad on 't: then we shall ha' means to vent
    Our musty superfluity. See, our best elders.
    [Enter COMINIUS, TITUS LARTIUS, and other Senators;]
    JUNIUS BRUTUS and SICINIUS VELUTUS]

    First Senator. CORIOLANUS, 'tis true that you have lately told us;
    The Volsces are in arms.

2 I / 1
  • Then, worthy CORIOLANUS,
    Attend upon Cominius to these wars.
  • Then, worthy CORIOLANUS,
    Attend upon Cominius to these wars.
  • Coriolanus. Were half to half the world by the ears and he.
    Upon my party, I'ld revolt to make
    Only my wars with him: he is a lion
    That I am proud to hunt.

    First Senator. Then, worthy CORIOLANUS,
    Attend upon Cominius to these wars.

3 I / 1
  • Your company to the Capitol; where, I know,
    Our greatest friends attend us.
  • Your company to the Capitol; where, I know,
    Our greatest friends attend us.
  • Menenius Agrippa. O, true-bred!

    First Senator. Your company to the Capitol; where, I know,
    Our greatest friends attend us.

4 I / 1
  • [To the Citizens] Hence to your homes; be gone!
  • [To the Citizens] Hence to your homes; be gone!
  • Cominius. Noble CORIOLANUS!

    First Senator. [To the Citizens] Hence to your homes; be gone!

5 I / 2
  • So, your opinion is, Aufidius,
    That they of Rome are entered in our counsels...
  • So, your opinion is, Aufidius,
    That they of Rome are entered in our counsels
    And know how we proceed.
  • Junius Brutus. Lets along.

    First Senator. So, your opinion is, Aufidius,
    That they of Rome are entered in our counsels
    And know how we proceed.

6 I / 2
  • Our army's in the field
    We never yet made doubt but Rome was ready
    To an...
  • Our army's in the field
    We never yet made doubt but Rome was ready
    To answer us.
  • Tullus Aufidius. Is it not yours?
    What ever have been thought on in this state,
    That could be brought to bodily act ere Rome
    Had circumvention? 'Tis not four days gone
    Since I heard thence; these are the words: I think
    I have the letter here; yes, here it is.
    [Reads]
    'They have press'd a power, but it is not known
    Whether for east or west: the dearth is great;
    The people mutinous; and it is rumour'd,
    Cominius, CORIOLANUS your old enemy,
    Who is of Rome worse hated than of you,
    And Titus TITUS, a most valiant Roman,
    These three lead on this preparation
    Whither 'tis bent: most likely 'tis for you:
    Consider of it.'

    First Senator. Our army's in the field
    We never yet made doubt but Rome was ready
    To answer us.

7 I / 2
  • Farewell.
  • Farewell.
  • Tullus Aufidius. And keep your honours safe!

    First Senator. Farewell.

8 I / 4
  • No, nor a man that fears you less than he,
    That's lesser than a little.
    ...
  • No, nor a man that fears you less than he,
    That's lesser than a little.
    [Drums afar off]
    Hark! our drums
    Are bringing forth our youth. We'll break our walls,
    Rather than they shall pound us up: our gates,
    Which yet seem shut, we, have but pinn'd with rushes;
    They'll open of themselves.
    [Alarum afar off]
    Hark you. far off!
    There is Aufidius; list, what work he makes
    Amongst your cloven army.
  • Coriolanus. Then shall we hear their 'larum, and they ours.
    Now, Mars, I prithee, make us quick in work,
    That we with smoking swords may march from hence,
    To help our fielded friends! Come, blow thy blast.
    [They sound a parley. Enter two Senators with others]
    on the walls]
    Tutus Aufidius, is he within your walls?

    First Senator. No, nor a man that fears you less than he,
    That's lesser than a little.
    [Drums afar off]
    Hark! our drums
    Are bringing forth our youth. We'll break our walls,
    Rather than they shall pound us up: our gates,
    Which yet seem shut, we, have but pinn'd with rushes;
    They'll open of themselves.
    [Alarum afar off]
    Hark you. far off!
    There is Aufidius; list, what work he makes
    Amongst your cloven army.

9 II / 2
  • Speak, good Cominius:
    Leave nothing out for length, and make us think
    Ra...
  • Speak, good Cominius:
    Leave nothing out for length, and make us think
    Rather our state's defective for requital
    Than we to stretch it out.
    [To the Tribunes]
    Masters o' the people,
    We do request your kindest ears, and after,
    Your loving motion toward the common body,
    To yield what passes here.
  • Menenius Agrippa. Having determined of the Volsces and
    To send for Titus TITUS, it remains,
    As the main point of this our after-meeting,
    To gratify his noble service that
    Hath thus stood for his country: therefore,
    please you,
    Most reverend and grave elders, to desire
    The present consul, and last general
    In our well-found successes, to report
    A little of that worthy work perform'd
    By Caius CORIOLANUS Coriolanus, whom
    We met here both to thank and to remember
    With honours like himself.

    First Senator. Speak, good Cominius:
    Leave nothing out for length, and make us think
    Rather our state's defective for requital
    Than we to stretch it out.
    [To the Tribunes]
    Masters o' the people,
    We do request your kindest ears, and after,
    Your loving motion toward the common body,
    To yield what passes here.

10 II / 2
  • Sit, Coriolanus; never shame to hear
    What you have nobly done.
  • Sit, Coriolanus; never shame to hear
    What you have nobly done.
  • Menenius Agrippa. He loves your people
    But tie him not to be their bedfellow.
    Worthy Cominius, speak.
    [CORIOLANUS offers to go away]
    Nay, keep your place.

    First Senator. Sit, Coriolanus; never shame to hear
    What you have nobly done.

11 II / 2
  • He cannot but with measure fit the honours
    Which we devise him.
  • He cannot but with measure fit the honours
    Which we devise him.
  • Menenius Agrippa. Worthy man!

    First Senator. He cannot but with measure fit the honours
    Which we devise him.

12 II / 2
  • Call Coriolanus.
  • Call Coriolanus.
  • Menenius Agrippa. He's right noble:
    Let him be call'd for.

    First Senator. Call Coriolanus.

13 III / 1
  • Tribunes, give way; he shall to the market-place.
  • Tribunes, give way; he shall to the market-place.
  • Coriolanus. Have I had children's voices?

    First Senator. Tribunes, give way; he shall to the market-place.

14 III / 1
  • Not in this heat, sir, now.
  • Not in this heat, sir, now.
  • Menenius Agrippa. Not now, not now.

    First Senator. Not in this heat, sir, now.

15 III / 1
  • No more words, we beseech you.
  • No more words, we beseech you.
  • Menenius Agrippa. Well, no more.

    First Senator. No more words, we beseech you.

16 III / 1
  • To unbuild the city and to lay all flat.
  • To unbuild the city and to lay all flat.
  • Menenius Agrippa. Fie, fie, fie!
    This is the way to kindle, not to quench.

    First Senator. To unbuild the city and to lay all flat.

17 III / 1
  • The gods forbid!
    I prithee, noble friend, home to thy house;
    Leave us to...
  • The gods forbid!
    I prithee, noble friend, home to thy house;
    Leave us to cure this cause.
  • Menenius Agrippa. Sham it be put to that?

    First Senator. The gods forbid!
    I prithee, noble friend, home to thy house;
    Leave us to cure this cause.

18 III / 1
  • Noble tribunes,
    It is the humane way: the other course
    Will prove too bl...
  • Noble tribunes,
    It is the humane way: the other course
    Will prove too bloody, and the end of it
    Unknown to the beginning.
  • Menenius Agrippa. Consider this: he has been bred i' the wars
    Since he could draw a sword, and is ill school'd
    In bolted language; meal and bran together
    He throws without distinction. Give me leave,
    I'll go to him, and undertake to bring him
    Where he shall answer, by a lawful form,
    In peace, to his utmost peril.

    First Senator. Noble tribunes,
    It is the humane way: the other course
    Will prove too bloody, and the end of it
    Unknown to the beginning.

19 III / 1
  • Pray you, let's to him.
  • Pray you, let's to him.
  • Menenius Agrippa. I'll bring him to you.
    [To the Senators]
    Let me desire your company: he must come,
    Or what is worst will follow.

    First Senator. Pray you, let's to him.

20 III / 2
  • There's no remedy;
    Unless, by not so doing, our good city
    Cleave in the...
  • There's no remedy;
    Unless, by not so doing, our good city
    Cleave in the midst, and perish.
  • Menenius Agrippa. Come, come, you have been too rough, something
    too rough;
    You must return and mend it.

    First Senator. There's no remedy;
    Unless, by not so doing, our good city
    Cleave in the midst, and perish.

21 III / 3
  • Amen, amen.
  • Amen, amen.
  • Coriolanus. Ay, as an ostler, that for the poorest piece
    Will bear the knave by the volume. The honour'd gods
    Keep Rome in safety, and the chairs of justice
    Supplied with worthy men! plant love among 's!
    Throng our large temples with the shows of peace,
    And not our streets with war!

    First Senator. Amen, amen.

22 V / 2
  • Stay: whence are you?
  • Stay: whence are you?
  • Cominius. I tell you, he does sit in gold, his eye
    Red as 'twould burn Rome; and his injury
    The gaoler to his pity. I kneel'd before him;
    'Twas very faintly he said 'Rise;' dismiss'd me
    Thus, with his speechless hand: what he would do,
    He sent in writing after me; what he would not,
    Bound with an oath to yield to his conditions:
    So that all hope is vain.
    Unless his noble mother, and his wife;
    Who, as I hear, mean to solicit him
    For mercy to his country. Therefore, let's hence,
    And with our fair entreaties haste them on.

    First Senator. Stay: whence are you?

23 V / 2
  • From whence?
  • From whence?
  • Menenius Agrippa. You guard like men; 'tis well: but, by your leave,
    I am an officer of state, and come
    To speak with Coriolanus.

    First Senator. From whence?

24 V / 2
  • You may not pass, you must return: our general
    Will no more hear from thence...
  • You may not pass, you must return: our general
    Will no more hear from thence.
  • Menenius Agrippa. From Rome.

    First Senator. You may not pass, you must return: our general
    Will no more hear from thence.

25 V / 2
  • Be it so; go back: the virtue of your name
    Is not here passable.
  • Be it so; go back: the virtue of your name
    Is not here passable.
  • Menenius Agrippa. Good my friends,
    If you have heard your general talk of Rome,
    And of his friends there, it is lots to blanks,
    My name hath touch'd your ears it is Menenius.

    First Senator. Be it so; go back: the virtue of your name
    Is not here passable.

26 V / 2
  • Faith, sir, if you had told as many lies in his
    behalf as you have uttered w...
  • Faith, sir, if you had told as many lies in his
    behalf as you have uttered words in your own, you
    should not pass here; no, though it were as virtuous
    to lie as to live chastely. Therefore, go back.
  • Menenius Agrippa. I tell thee, fellow,
    The general is my lover: I have been
    The book of his good acts, whence men have read
    His name unparallel'd, haply amplified;
    For I have ever verified my friends,
    Of whom he's chief, with all the size that verity
    Would without lapsing suffer: nay, sometimes,
    Like to a bowl upon a subtle ground,
    I have tumbled past the throw; and in his praise
    Have almost stamp'd the leasing: therefore, fellow,
    I must have leave to pass.

    First Senator. Faith, sir, if you had told as many lies in his
    behalf as you have uttered words in your own, you
    should not pass here; no, though it were as virtuous
    to lie as to live chastely. Therefore, go back.

27 V / 2
  • You are a Roman, are you?
  • You are a Roman, are you?
  • Menenius Agrippa. Has he dined, canst thou tell? for I would not
    speak with him till after dinner.

    First Senator. You are a Roman, are you?

28 V / 2
  • Then you should hate Rome, as he does. Can you,
    when you have pushed out you...
  • Then you should hate Rome, as he does. Can you,
    when you have pushed out your gates the very
    defender of them, and, in a violent popular
    ignorance, given your enemy your shield, think to
    front his revenges with the easy groans of old
    women, the virginal palms of your daughters, or with
    the palsied intercession of such a decayed dotant as
    you seem to be? Can you think to blow out the
    intended fire your city is ready to flame in, with
    such weak breath as this? No, you are deceived;
    therefore, back to Rome, and prepare for your
    execution: you are condemned, our general has sworn
    you out of reprieve and pardon.
  • Menenius Agrippa. I am, as thy general is.

    First Senator. Then you should hate Rome, as he does. Can you,
    when you have pushed out your gates the very
    defender of them, and, in a violent popular
    ignorance, given your enemy your shield, think to
    front his revenges with the easy groans of old
    women, the virginal palms of your daughters, or with
    the palsied intercession of such a decayed dotant as
    you seem to be? Can you think to blow out the
    intended fire your city is ready to flame in, with
    such weak breath as this? No, you are deceived;
    therefore, back to Rome, and prepare for your
    execution: you are condemned, our general has sworn
    you out of reprieve and pardon.

29 V / 2
  • My general cares not for you. Back, I say, go; lest
    I let forth your half-pi...
  • My general cares not for you. Back, I say, go; lest
    I let forth your half-pint of blood; back,--that's
    the utmost of your having: back.
  • Menenius Agrippa. I mean, thy general.

    First Senator. My general cares not for you. Back, I say, go; lest
    I let forth your half-pint of blood; back,--that's
    the utmost of your having: back.

30 V / 2
  • Now, sir, is your name Menenius?
  • Now, sir, is your name Menenius?
  • Tullus Aufidius. You keep a constant temper.

    First Senator. Now, sir, is your name Menenius?

31 V / 2
  • Do you hear how we are shent for keeping your
    greatness back?
  • Do you hear how we are shent for keeping your
    greatness back?
  • Second Senator. 'Tis a spell, you see, of much power: you know the
    way home again.

    First Senator. Do you hear how we are shent for keeping your
    greatness back?

32 V / 2
  • A noble fellow, I warrant him.
  • A noble fellow, I warrant him.
  • Menenius Agrippa. I neither care for the world nor your general: for
    such things as you, I can scarce think there's any,
    ye're so slight. He that hath a will to die by
    himself fears it not from another: let your general
    do his worst. For you, be that you are, long; and
    your misery increase with your age! I say to you,
    as I was said to, Away!

    First Senator. A noble fellow, I warrant him.

33 V / 5
  • Behold our patroness, the life of Rome!
    Call all your tribes together, prais...
  • Behold our patroness, the life of Rome!
    Call all your tribes together, praise the gods,
    And make triumphant fires; strew flowers before them:
    Unshout the noise that banish'd CORIOLANUS,
    Repeal him with the welcome of his mother;
    Cry 'Welcome, ladies, welcome!'
  • Sicinius Velutus. We will meet them,
    And help the joy.

    First Senator. Behold our patroness, the life of Rome!
    Call all your tribes together, praise the gods,
    And make triumphant fires; strew flowers before them:
    Unshout the noise that banish'd CORIOLANUS,
    Repeal him with the welcome of his mother;
    Cry 'Welcome, ladies, welcome!'

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© Copyright 2017-2021 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.