Speeches (Lines) for First Witch in "The Tragedy of Macbeth"

Total: 23
print
# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 1
  • When shall we three meet again
    In thunder, lightning, or in rain?
  • When shall we three meet again
    In thunder, lightning, or in rain?
  • .

    First Witch. When shall we three meet again
    In thunder, lightning, or in rain?

2 I / 1
  • Where the place?
  • Where the place?
  • Third Witch. That will be ere the set of sun.

    First Witch. Where the place?

3 I / 1
  • I come, Graymalkin!
  • I come, Graymalkin!
  • Third Witch. There to meet with Macbeth.

    First Witch. I come, Graymalkin!

4 I / 3
  • Where hast thou been, sister?
  • Where hast thou been, sister?
  • Duncan. What he hath lost noble Macbeth hath won.

    First Witch. Where hast thou been, sister?

5 I / 3
  • A sailor's wife had chestnuts in her lap,
    And munch'd, and munch'd, and munc...
  • A sailor's wife had chestnuts in her lap,
    And munch'd, and munch'd, and munch'd:--
    'Give me,' quoth I:
    'Aroint thee, witch!' the rump-fed ronyon cries.
    Her husband's to Aleppo gone, master o' the Tiger:
    But in a sieve I'll thither sail,
    And, like a rat without a tail,
    I'll do, I'll do, and I'll do.
  • Third Witch. Sister, where thou?

    First Witch. A sailor's wife had chestnuts in her lap,
    And munch'd, and munch'd, and munch'd:--
    'Give me,' quoth I:
    'Aroint thee, witch!' the rump-fed ronyon cries.
    Her husband's to Aleppo gone, master o' the Tiger:
    But in a sieve I'll thither sail,
    And, like a rat without a tail,
    I'll do, I'll do, and I'll do.

6 I / 3
  • Thou'rt kind.
  • Thou'rt kind.
  • Second Witch. I'll give thee a wind.

    First Witch. Thou'rt kind.

7 I / 3
  • I myself have all the other,
    And the very ports they blow,
    All the quart...
  • I myself have all the other,
    And the very ports they blow,
    All the quarters that they know
    I' the shipman's card.
    I will drain him dry as hay:
    Sleep shall neither night nor day
    Hang upon his pent-house lid;
    He shall live a man forbid:
    Weary se'nnights nine times nine
    Shall he dwindle, peak and pine:
    Though his bark cannot be lost,
    Yet it shall be tempest-tost.
    Look what I have.
  • Third Witch. And I another.

    First Witch. I myself have all the other,
    And the very ports they blow,
    All the quarters that they know
    I' the shipman's card.
    I will drain him dry as hay:
    Sleep shall neither night nor day
    Hang upon his pent-house lid;
    He shall live a man forbid:
    Weary se'nnights nine times nine
    Shall he dwindle, peak and pine:
    Though his bark cannot be lost,
    Yet it shall be tempest-tost.
    Look what I have.

8 I / 3
  • Here I have a pilot's thumb,
    Wreck'd as homeward he did come.
  • Here I have a pilot's thumb,
    Wreck'd as homeward he did come.
  • Second Witch. Show me, show me.

    First Witch. Here I have a pilot's thumb,
    Wreck'd as homeward he did come.

9 I / 3
  • All hail, Macbeth! hail to thee, thane of Glamis!
  • All hail, Macbeth! hail to thee, thane of Glamis!
  • Macbeth. Speak, if you can: what are you?

    First Witch. All hail, Macbeth! hail to thee, thane of Glamis!

10 I / 3
  • Hail!
  • Hail!
  • Banquo. Good sir, why do you start; and seem to fear
    Things that do sound so fair? I' the name of truth,
    Are ye fantastical, or that indeed
    Which outwardly ye show? My noble partner
    You greet with present grace and great prediction
    Of noble having and of royal hope,
    That he seems rapt withal: to me you speak not.
    If you can look into the seeds of time,
    And say which grain will grow and which will not,
    Speak then to me, who neither beg nor fear
    Your favours nor your hate.

    First Witch. Hail!

11 I / 3
  • Lesser than Macbeth, and greater.
  • Lesser than Macbeth, and greater.
  • Third Witch. Hail!

    First Witch. Lesser than Macbeth, and greater.

12 I / 3
  • Banquo and Macbeth, all hail!
  • Banquo and Macbeth, all hail!
  • Third Witch. Thou shalt get kings, though thou be none:
    So all hail, Macbeth and Banquo!

    First Witch. Banquo and Macbeth, all hail!

13 III / 5
  • Why, how now, Hecate! you look angerly.
  • Why, how now, Hecate! you look angerly.
  • Macbeth. Come, we'll to sleep. My strange and self-abuse
    Is the initiate fear that wants hard use:
    We are yet but young in deed.

    First Witch. Why, how now, Hecate! you look angerly.

14 III / 5
  • Come, let's make haste; she'll soon be back again.
  • Come, let's make haste; she'll soon be back again.
  • Hecate. Have I not reason, beldams as you are,
    Saucy and overbold? How did you dare
    To trade and traffic with Macbeth
    In riddles and affairs of death;
    And I, the mistress of your charms,
    The close contriver of all harms,
    Was never call'd to bear my part,
    Or show the glory of our art?
    And, which is worse, all you have done
    Hath been but for a wayward son,
    Spiteful and wrathful, who, as others do,
    Loves for his own ends, not for you.
    But make amends now: get you gone,
    And at the pit of Acheron
    Meet me i' the morning: thither he
    Will come to know his destiny:
    Your vessels and your spells provide,
    Your charms and every thing beside.
    I am for the air; this night I'll spend
    Unto a dismal and a fatal end:
    Great business must be wrought ere noon:
    Upon the corner of the moon
    There hangs a vaporous drop profound;
    I'll catch it ere it come to ground:
    And that distill'd by magic sleights
    Shall raise such artificial sprites
    As by the strength of their illusion
    Shall draw him on to his confusion:
    He shall spurn fate, scorn death, and bear
    He hopes 'bove wisdom, grace and fear:
    And you all know, security
    Is mortals' chiefest enemy.
    [Music and a song within: 'Come away, come away,' &c]
    Hark! I am call'd; my little spirit, see,
    Sits in a foggy cloud, and stays for me.

    First Witch. Come, let's make haste; she'll soon be back again.

15 IV / 1
  • Thrice the brinded cat hath mew'd.
  • Thrice the brinded cat hath mew'd.
  • Lord. I'll send my prayers with him.

    First Witch. Thrice the brinded cat hath mew'd.

16 IV / 1
  • Round about the cauldron go;
    In the poison'd entrails throw.
    Toad, that...
  • Round about the cauldron go;
    In the poison'd entrails throw.
    Toad, that under cold stone
    Days and nights has thirty-one
    Swelter'd venom sleeping got,
    Boil thou first i' the charmed pot.
  • Third Witch. Harpier cries 'Tis time, 'tis time.

    First Witch. Round about the cauldron go;
    In the poison'd entrails throw.
    Toad, that under cold stone
    Days and nights has thirty-one
    Swelter'd venom sleeping got,
    Boil thou first i' the charmed pot.

17 IV / 1
  • Speak.
  • Speak.
  • Macbeth. I conjure you, by that which you profess,
    Howe'er you come to know it, answer me:
    Though you untie the winds and let them fight
    Against the churches; though the yesty waves
    Confound and swallow navigation up;
    Though bladed corn be lodged and trees blown down;
    Though castles topple on their warders' heads;
    Though palaces and pyramids do slope
    Their heads to their foundations; though the treasure
    Of nature's germens tumble all together,
    Even till destruction sicken; answer me
    To what I ask you.

    First Witch. Speak.

18 IV / 1
  • Say, if thou'dst rather hear it from our mouths,
    Or from our masters?
  • Say, if thou'dst rather hear it from our mouths,
    Or from our masters?
  • Third Witch. We'll answer.

    First Witch. Say, if thou'dst rather hear it from our mouths,
    Or from our masters?

19 IV / 1
  • Pour in sow's blood, that hath eaten
    Her nine farrow; grease that's sweaten...
  • Pour in sow's blood, that hath eaten
    Her nine farrow; grease that's sweaten
    From the murderer's gibbet throw
    Into the flame.
  • Macbeth. Call 'em; let me see 'em.

    First Witch. Pour in sow's blood, that hath eaten
    Her nine farrow; grease that's sweaten
    From the murderer's gibbet throw
    Into the flame.

20 IV / 1
  • He knows thy thought:
    Hear his speech, but say thou nought.
  • He knows thy thought:
    Hear his speech, but say thou nought.
  • Macbeth. Tell me, thou unknown power,--

    First Witch. He knows thy thought:
    Hear his speech, but say thou nought.

21 IV / 1
  • He will not be commanded: here's another,
    More potent than the first.
  • He will not be commanded: here's another,
    More potent than the first.
  • Macbeth. Whate'er thou art, for thy good caution, thanks;
    Thou hast harp'd my fear aright: but one
    word more,--

    First Witch. He will not be commanded: here's another,
    More potent than the first.

22 IV / 1
  • Show!
  • Show!
  • Macbeth. I will be satisfied: deny me this,
    And an eternal curse fall on you! Let me know.
    Why sinks that cauldron? and what noise is this?

    First Witch. Show!

23 IV / 1
  • Ay, sir, all this is so: but why
    Stands Macbeth thus amazedly?
    Come, sis...
  • Ay, sir, all this is so: but why
    Stands Macbeth thus amazedly?
    Come, sisters, cheer we up his sprites,
    And show the best of our delights:
    I'll charm the air to give a sound,
    While you perform your antic round:
    That this great king may kindly say,
    Our duties did his welcome pay.
  • Macbeth. Thou art too like the spirit of Banquo: down!
    Thy crown does sear mine eye-balls. And thy hair,
    Thou other gold-bound brow, is like the first.
    A third is like the former. Filthy hags!
    Why do you show me this? A fourth! Start, eyes!
    What, will the line stretch out to the crack of doom?
    Another yet! A seventh! I'll see no more:
    And yet the eighth appears, who bears a glass
    Which shows me many more; and some I see
    That two-fold balls and treble scepters carry:
    Horrible sight! Now, I see, 'tis true;
    For the blood-bolter'd Banquo smiles upon me,
    And points at them for his.
    [Apparitions vanish]
    What, is this so?

    First Witch. Ay, sir, all this is so: but why
    Stands Macbeth thus amazedly?
    Come, sisters, cheer we up his sprites,
    And show the best of our delights:
    I'll charm the air to give a sound,
    While you perform your antic round:
    That this great king may kindly say,
    Our duties did his welcome pay.

© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.

shakespeare_network

© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.