Speeches (Lines) for Sir Andrew Aguecheek in "Twelfth Night; or, What You Will"

Total: 88
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 3
  • Sir Toby Belch! how now, Sir Toby Belch!
  • Sir Toby Belch! how now, Sir Toby Belch!
  • Sir Toby Belch. With drinking healths to my niece: I'll drink to
    her as long as there is a passage in my throat and
    drink in Illyria: he's a coward and a coystrill
    that will not drink to my niece till his brains turn
    o' the toe like a parish-top. What, wench!
    Castiliano vulgo! for here comes Sir Andrew Agueface.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Sir Toby Belch! how now, Sir Toby Belch!

2 I / 3
  • Bless you, fair shrew.
  • Bless you, fair shrew.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Sweet Sir Andrew!

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Bless you, fair shrew.

3 I / 3
  • What's that?
  • What's that?
  • Sir Toby Belch. Accost, Sir Andrew, accost.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. What's that?

4 I / 3
  • Good Mistress Accost, I desire better acquaintance.
  • Good Mistress Accost, I desire better acquaintance.
  • Sir Toby Belch. My niece's chambermaid.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Good Mistress Accost, I desire better acquaintance.

5 I / 3
  • Good Mistress Mary Accost,--
  • Good Mistress Mary Accost,--
  • Maria. My name is Mary, sir.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Good Mistress Mary Accost,--

6 I / 3
  • By my troth, I would not undertake her in this
    company. Is that the meaning...
  • By my troth, I would not undertake her in this
    company. Is that the meaning of 'accost'?
  • Sir Toby Belch. You mistake, knight; 'accost' is front her, board
    her, woo her, assail her.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. By my troth, I would not undertake her in this
    company. Is that the meaning of 'accost'?

7 I / 3
  • An you part so, mistress, I would I might never
    draw sword again. Fair lady,...
  • An you part so, mistress, I would I might never
    draw sword again. Fair lady, do you think you have
    fools in hand?
  • Sir Toby Belch. An thou let part so, Sir Andrew, would thou mightst
    never draw sword again.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. An you part so, mistress, I would I might never
    draw sword again. Fair lady, do you think you have
    fools in hand?

8 I / 3
  • Marry, but you shall have; and here's my hand.
  • Marry, but you shall have; and here's my hand.
  • Maria. Sir, I have not you by the hand.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Marry, but you shall have; and here's my hand.

9 I / 3
  • Wherefore, sweet-heart? what's your metaphor?
  • Wherefore, sweet-heart? what's your metaphor?
  • Maria. Now, sir, 'thought is free:' I pray you, bring
    your hand to the buttery-bar and let it drink.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Wherefore, sweet-heart? what's your metaphor?

10 I / 3
  • Why, I think so: I am not such an ass but I can
    keep my hand dry. But what's...
  • Why, I think so: I am not such an ass but I can
    keep my hand dry. But what's your jest?
  • Maria. It's dry, sir.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Why, I think so: I am not such an ass but I can
    keep my hand dry. But what's your jest?

11 I / 3
  • Are you full of them?
  • Are you full of them?
  • Maria. A dry jest, sir.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Are you full of them?

12 I / 3
  • Never in your life, I think; unless you see canary
    put me down. Methinks som...
  • Never in your life, I think; unless you see canary
    put me down. Methinks sometimes I have no more wit
    than a Christian or an ordinary man has: but I am a
    great eater of beef and I believe that does harm to my wit.
  • Sir Toby Belch. O knight thou lackest a cup of canary: when did I
    see thee so put down?

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Never in your life, I think; unless you see canary
    put me down. Methinks sometimes I have no more wit
    than a Christian or an ordinary man has: but I am a
    great eater of beef and I believe that does harm to my wit.

13 I / 3
  • An I thought that, I'ld forswear it. I'll ride home
    to-morrow, Sir Toby.
  • An I thought that, I'ld forswear it. I'll ride home
    to-morrow, Sir Toby.
  • Sir Toby Belch. No question.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. An I thought that, I'ld forswear it. I'll ride home
    to-morrow, Sir Toby.

14 I / 3
  • What is 'Pourquoi'? do or not do? I would I had
    bestowed that time in the to...
  • What is 'Pourquoi'? do or not do? I would I had
    bestowed that time in the tongues that I have in
    fencing, dancing and bear-baiting: O, had I but
    followed the arts!
  • Sir Toby Belch. Pourquoi, my dear knight?

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. What is 'Pourquoi'? do or not do? I would I had
    bestowed that time in the tongues that I have in
    fencing, dancing and bear-baiting: O, had I but
    followed the arts!

15 I / 3
  • Why, would that have mended my hair?
  • Why, would that have mended my hair?
  • Sir Toby Belch. Then hadst thou had an excellent head of hair.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Why, would that have mended my hair?

16 I / 3
  • But it becomes me well enough, does't not?
  • But it becomes me well enough, does't not?
  • Sir Toby Belch. Past question; for thou seest it will not curl by nature.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. But it becomes me well enough, does't not?

17 I / 3
  • Faith, I'll home to-morrow, Sir Toby: your niece
    will not be seen; or if she...
  • Faith, I'll home to-morrow, Sir Toby: your niece
    will not be seen; or if she be, it's four to one
    she'll none of me: the count himself here hard by woos her.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Excellent; it hangs like flax on a distaff; and I
    hope to see a housewife take thee between her legs
    and spin it off.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Faith, I'll home to-morrow, Sir Toby: your niece
    will not be seen; or if she be, it's four to one
    she'll none of me: the count himself here hard by woos her.

18 I / 3
  • I'll stay a month longer. I am a fellow o' the
    strangest mind i' the world;...
  • I'll stay a month longer. I am a fellow o' the
    strangest mind i' the world; I delight in masques
    and revels sometimes altogether.
  • Sir Toby Belch. She'll none o' the count: she'll not match above
    her degree, neither in estate, years, nor wit; I
    have heard her swear't. Tut, there's life in't,
    man.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. I'll stay a month longer. I am a fellow o' the
    strangest mind i' the world; I delight in masques
    and revels sometimes altogether.

19 I / 3
  • As any man in Illyria, whatsoever he be, under the
    degree of my betters; and...
  • As any man in Illyria, whatsoever he be, under the
    degree of my betters; and yet I will not compare
    with an old man.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Art thou good at these kickshawses, knight?

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. As any man in Illyria, whatsoever he be, under the
    degree of my betters; and yet I will not compare
    with an old man.

20 I / 3
  • Faith, I can cut a caper.
  • Faith, I can cut a caper.
  • Sir Toby Belch. What is thy excellence in a galliard, knight?

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Faith, I can cut a caper.

21 I / 3
  • And I think I have the back-trick simply as strong
    as any man in Illyria.
  • And I think I have the back-trick simply as strong
    as any man in Illyria.
  • Sir Toby Belch. And I can cut the mutton to't.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. And I think I have the back-trick simply as strong
    as any man in Illyria.

22 I / 3
  • Ay, 'tis strong, and it does indifferent well in a
    flame-coloured stock. Sha...
  • Ay, 'tis strong, and it does indifferent well in a
    flame-coloured stock. Shall we set about some revels?
  • Sir Toby Belch. Wherefore are these things hid? wherefore have
    these gifts a curtain before 'em? are they like to
    take dust, like Mistress Mall's picture? why dost
    thou not go to church in a galliard and come home in
    a coranto? My very walk should be a jig; I would not
    so much as make water but in a sink-a-pace. What
    dost thou mean? Is it a world to hide virtues in?
    I did think, by the excellent constitution of thy
    leg, it was formed under the star of a galliard.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Ay, 'tis strong, and it does indifferent well in a
    flame-coloured stock. Shall we set about some revels?

23 I / 3
  • Taurus! That's sides and heart.
  • Taurus! That's sides and heart.
  • Sir Toby Belch. What shall we do else? were we not born under Taurus?

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Taurus! That's sides and heart.

24 II / 3
  • Nay, my troth, I know not: but I know, to be up
    late is to be up late.
  • Nay, my troth, I know not: but I know, to be up
    late is to be up late.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Approach, Sir Andrew: not to be abed after
    midnight is to be up betimes; and 'diluculo
    surgere,' thou know'st,--

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Nay, my troth, I know not: but I know, to be up
    late is to be up late.

25 II / 3
  • Faith, so they say; but I think it rather consists
    of eating and drinking.
  • Faith, so they say; but I think it rather consists
    of eating and drinking.
  • Sir Toby Belch. A false conclusion: I hate it as an unfilled can.
    To be up after midnight and to go to bed then, is
    early: so that to go to bed after midnight is to go
    to bed betimes. Does not our life consist of the
    four elements?

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Faith, so they say; but I think it rather consists
    of eating and drinking.

26 II / 3
  • Here comes the fool, i' faith.
  • Here comes the fool, i' faith.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Thou'rt a scholar; let us therefore eat and drink.
    Marian, I say! a stoup of wine!

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Here comes the fool, i' faith.

27 II / 3
  • By my troth, the fool has an excellent breast. I
    had rather than forty shill...
  • By my troth, the fool has an excellent breast. I
    had rather than forty shillings I had such a leg,
    and so sweet a breath to sing, as the fool has. In
    sooth, thou wast in very gracious fooling last
    night, when thou spokest of Pigrogromitus, of the
    Vapians passing the equinoctial of Queubus: 'twas
    very good, i' faith. I sent thee sixpence for thy
    leman: hadst it?
  • Sir Toby Belch. Welcome, ass. Now let's have a catch.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. By my troth, the fool has an excellent breast. I
    had rather than forty shillings I had such a leg,
    and so sweet a breath to sing, as the fool has. In
    sooth, thou wast in very gracious fooling last
    night, when thou spokest of Pigrogromitus, of the
    Vapians passing the equinoctial of Queubus: 'twas
    very good, i' faith. I sent thee sixpence for thy
    leman: hadst it?

28 II / 3
  • Excellent! why, this is the best fooling, when all
    is done. Now, a song.
  • Excellent! why, this is the best fooling, when all
    is done. Now, a song.
  • Feste. I did impeticos thy gratillity; for Malvolio's nose
    is no whipstock: my lady has a white hand, and the
    Myrmidons are no bottle-ale houses.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Excellent! why, this is the best fooling, when all
    is done. Now, a song.

29 II / 3
  • There's a testril of me too: if one knight give a--
  • There's a testril of me too: if one knight give a--
  • Sir Toby Belch. Come on; there is sixpence for you: let's have a song.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. There's a testril of me too: if one knight give a--

30 II / 3
  • Ay, ay: I care not for good life.
  • Ay, ay: I care not for good life.
  • Sir Toby Belch. A love-song, a love-song.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Ay, ay: I care not for good life.

31 II / 3
  • Excellent good, i' faith.
  • Excellent good, i' faith.
  • Feste. [Sings]
    O mistress mine, where are you roaming?
    O, stay and hear; your true love's coming,
    That can sing both high and low:
    Trip no further, pretty sweeting;
    Journeys end in lovers meeting,
    Every wise man's son doth know.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Excellent good, i' faith.

32 II / 3
  • A mellifluous voice, as I am true knight.
  • A mellifluous voice, as I am true knight.
  • Feste. [Sings]
    What is love? 'tis not hereafter;
    Present mirth hath present laughter;
    What's to come is still unsure:
    In delay there lies no plenty;
    Then come kiss me, sweet and twenty,
    Youth's a stuff will not endure.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. A mellifluous voice, as I am true knight.

33 II / 3
  • Very sweet and contagious, i' faith.
  • Very sweet and contagious, i' faith.
  • Sir Toby Belch. A contagious breath.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Very sweet and contagious, i' faith.

34 II / 3
  • An you love me, let's do't: I am dog at a catch.
  • An you love me, let's do't: I am dog at a catch.
  • Sir Toby Belch. To hear by the nose, it is dulcet in contagion.
    But shall we make the welkin dance indeed? shall we
    rouse the night-owl in a catch that will draw three
    souls out of one weaver? shall we do that?

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. An you love me, let's do't: I am dog at a catch.

35 II / 3
  • Most certain. Let our catch be, 'Thou knave.'
  • Most certain. Let our catch be, 'Thou knave.'
  • Feste. By'r lady, sir, and some dogs will catch well.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Most certain. Let our catch be, 'Thou knave.'

36 II / 3
  • 'Tis not the first time I have constrained one to
    call me knave. Begin, fool...
  • 'Tis not the first time I have constrained one to
    call me knave. Begin, fool: it begins 'Hold thy peace.'
  • Feste. 'Hold thy peace, thou knave,' knight? I shall be
    constrained in't to call thee knave, knight.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. 'Tis not the first time I have constrained one to
    call me knave. Begin, fool: it begins 'Hold thy peace.'

37 II / 3
  • Good, i' faith. Come, begin.
  • Good, i' faith. Come, begin.
  • Feste. I shall never begin if I hold my peace.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Good, i' faith. Come, begin.

38 II / 3
  • Ay, he does well enough if he be disposed, and so do
    I too: he does it with...
  • Ay, he does well enough if he be disposed, and so do
    I too: he does it with a better grace, but I do it
    more natural.
  • Feste. Beshrew me, the knight's in admirable fooling.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Ay, he does well enough if he be disposed, and so do
    I too: he does it with a better grace, but I do it
    more natural.

39 II / 3
  • 'Twere as good a deed as to drink when a man's
    a-hungry, to challenge him th...
  • 'Twere as good a deed as to drink when a man's
    a-hungry, to challenge him the field, and then to
    break promise with him and make a fool of him.
  • Maria. Go shake your ears.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. 'Twere as good a deed as to drink when a man's
    a-hungry, to challenge him the field, and then to
    break promise with him and make a fool of him.

40 II / 3
  • O, if I thought that I'ld beat him like a dog!
  • O, if I thought that I'ld beat him like a dog!
  • Maria. Marry, sir, sometimes he is a kind of puritan.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. O, if I thought that I'ld beat him like a dog!

41 II / 3
  • I have no exquisite reason for't, but I have reason
    good enough.
  • I have no exquisite reason for't, but I have reason
    good enough.
  • Sir Toby Belch. What, for being a puritan? thy exquisite reason,
    dear knight?

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. I have no exquisite reason for't, but I have reason
    good enough.

42 II / 3
  • I have't in my nose too.
  • I have't in my nose too.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Excellent! I smell a device.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. I have't in my nose too.

43 II / 3
  • And your horse now would make him an ass.
  • And your horse now would make him an ass.
  • Maria. My purpose is, indeed, a horse of that colour.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. And your horse now would make him an ass.

44 II / 3
  • O, 'twill be admirable!
  • O, 'twill be admirable!
  • Maria. Ass, I doubt not.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. O, 'twill be admirable!

45 II / 3
  • Before me, she's a good wench.
  • Before me, she's a good wench.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Good night, Penthesilea.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Before me, she's a good wench.

46 II / 3
  • I was adored once too.
  • I was adored once too.
  • Sir Toby Belch. She's a beagle, true-bred, and one that adores me:
    what o' that?

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. I was adored once too.

47 II / 3
  • If I cannot recover your niece, I am a foul way out.
  • If I cannot recover your niece, I am a foul way out.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Let's to bed, knight. Thou hadst need send for
    more money.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. If I cannot recover your niece, I am a foul way out.

48 II / 3
  • If I do not, never trust me, take it how you will.
  • If I do not, never trust me, take it how you will.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Send for money, knight: if thou hast her not i'
    the end, call me cut.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. If I do not, never trust me, take it how you will.

49 II / 5
  • An we do not, it is pity of our lives.
  • An we do not, it is pity of our lives.
  • Sir Toby Belch. To anger him we'll have the bear again; and we will
    fool him black and blue: shall we not, Sir Andrew?

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. An we do not, it is pity of our lives.

50 II / 5
  • 'Slight, I could so beat the rogue!
  • 'Slight, I could so beat the rogue!
  • Fabian. O, peace! Contemplation makes a rare turkey-cock
    of him: how he jets under his advanced plumes!

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. 'Slight, I could so beat the rogue!

51 II / 5
  • Pistol him, pistol him.
  • Pistol him, pistol him.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Ah, rogue!

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Pistol him, pistol him.

52 II / 5
  • Fie on him, Jezebel!
  • Fie on him, Jezebel!
  • Malvolio. There is example for't; the lady of the Strachy
    married the yeoman of the wardrobe.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Fie on him, Jezebel!

53 II / 5
  • That's me, I warrant you.
  • That's me, I warrant you.
  • Malvolio. 'Besides, you waste the treasure of your time with
    a foolish knight,'--

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. That's me, I warrant you.

54 II / 5
  • I knew 'twas I; for many do call me fool.
  • I knew 'twas I; for many do call me fool.
  • Malvolio. 'One Sir Andrew,'--

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. I knew 'twas I; for many do call me fool.

55 II / 5
  • Her C's, her U's and her T's: why that?
  • Her C's, her U's and her T's: why that?
  • Malvolio. By my life, this is my lady's hand these be her
    very C's, her U's and her T's and thus makes she her
    great P's. It is, in contempt of question, her hand.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Her C's, her U's and her T's: why that?

56 II / 5
  • So could I too.
  • So could I too.
  • Sir Toby Belch. I could marry this wench for this device.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. So could I too.

57 II / 5
  • Nor I neither.
  • Nor I neither.
  • Sir Toby Belch. And ask no other dowry with her but such another jest.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Nor I neither.

58 II / 5
  • Or o' mine either?
  • Or o' mine either?
  • Sir Toby Belch. Wilt thou set thy foot o' my neck?

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Or o' mine either?

59 II / 5
  • I' faith, or I either?
  • I' faith, or I either?
  • Sir Toby Belch. Shall I play my freedom at traytrip, and become thy
    bond-slave?

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. I' faith, or I either?

60 II / 5
  • I'll make one too.
  • I'll make one too.
  • Sir Toby Belch. To the gates of Tartar, thou most excellent devil of wit!

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. I'll make one too.

61 III / 1
  • Dieu vous garde, monsieur.
  • Dieu vous garde, monsieur.
  • Viola. And you, sir.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Dieu vous garde, monsieur.

62 III / 1
  • I hope, sir, you are; and I am yours.
  • I hope, sir, you are; and I am yours.
  • Viola. Et vous aussi; votre serviteur.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. I hope, sir, you are; and I am yours.

63 III / 1
  • That youth's a rare courtier: 'Rain odours;' well.
  • That youth's a rare courtier: 'Rain odours;' well.
  • Viola. I will answer you with gait and entrance. But we
    are prevented.
    [Enter OLIVIA and MARIA]
    Most excellent accomplished lady, the heavens rain
    odours on you!

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. That youth's a rare courtier: 'Rain odours;' well.

64 III / 1
  • 'Odours,' 'pregnant' and 'vouchsafed:' I'll get 'em
    all three all ready.
  • 'Odours,' 'pregnant' and 'vouchsafed:' I'll get 'em
    all three all ready.
  • Viola. My matter hath no voice, to your own most pregnant
    and vouchsafed ear.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. 'Odours,' 'pregnant' and 'vouchsafed:' I'll get 'em
    all three all ready.

65 III / 2
  • No, faith, I'll not stay a jot longer.
  • No, faith, I'll not stay a jot longer.
  • Olivia. Yet come again; for thou perhaps mayst move
    That heart, which now abhors, to like his love.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. No, faith, I'll not stay a jot longer.

66 III / 2
  • Marry, I saw your niece do more favours to the
    count's serving-man than ever...
  • Marry, I saw your niece do more favours to the
    count's serving-man than ever she bestowed upon me;
    I saw't i' the orchard.
  • Fabian. You must needs yield your reason, Sir Andrew.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Marry, I saw your niece do more favours to the
    count's serving-man than ever she bestowed upon me;
    I saw't i' the orchard.

67 III / 2
  • As plain as I see you now.
  • As plain as I see you now.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Did she see thee the while, old boy? tell me that.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. As plain as I see you now.

68 III / 2
  • 'Slight, will you make an ass o' me?
  • 'Slight, will you make an ass o' me?
  • Fabian. This was a great argument of love in her toward you.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. 'Slight, will you make an ass o' me?

69 III / 2
  • An't be any way, it must be with valour; for policy
    I hate: I had as lief be...
  • An't be any way, it must be with valour; for policy
    I hate: I had as lief be a Brownist as a
    politician.
  • Fabian. She did show favour to the youth in your sight only
    to exasperate you, to awake your dormouse valour, to
    put fire in your heart and brimstone in your liver.
    You should then have accosted her; and with some
    excellent jests, fire-new from the mint, you should
    have banged the youth into dumbness. This was
    looked for at your hand, and this was balked: the
    double gilt of this opportunity you let time wash
    off, and you are now sailed into the north of my
    lady's opinion; where you will hang like an icicle
    on a Dutchman's beard, unless you do redeem it by
    some laudable attempt either of valour or policy.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. An't be any way, it must be with valour; for policy
    I hate: I had as lief be a Brownist as a
    politician.

70 III / 2
  • Will either of you bear me a challenge to him?
  • Will either of you bear me a challenge to him?
  • Fabian. There is no way but this, Sir Andrew.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Will either of you bear me a challenge to him?

71 III / 2
  • Where shall I find you?
  • Where shall I find you?
  • Sir Toby Belch. Go, write it in a martial hand; be curst and brief;
    it is no matter how witty, so it be eloquent and fun
    of invention: taunt him with the licence of ink:
    if thou thou'st him some thrice, it shall not be
    amiss; and as many lies as will lie in thy sheet of
    paper, although the sheet were big enough for the
    bed of Ware in England, set 'em down: go, about it.
    Let there be gall enough in thy ink, though thou
    write with a goose-pen, no matter: about it.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Where shall I find you?

72 III / 4
  • Here's the challenge, read it: warrant there's
    vinegar and pepper in't.
  • Here's the challenge, read it: warrant there's
    vinegar and pepper in't.
  • Fabian. More matter for a May morning.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Here's the challenge, read it: warrant there's
    vinegar and pepper in't.

73 III / 4
  • Ay, is't, I warrant him: do but read.
  • Ay, is't, I warrant him: do but read.
  • Fabian. Is't so saucy?

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Ay, is't, I warrant him: do but read.

74 III / 4
  • Nay, let me alone for swearing.
  • Nay, let me alone for swearing.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Go, Sir Andrew: scout me for him at the corner the
    orchard like a bum-baily: so soon as ever thou seest
    him, draw; and, as thou drawest swear horrible; for
    it comes to pass oft that a terrible oath, with a
    swaggering accent sharply twanged off, gives manhood
    more approbation than ever proof itself would have
    earned him. Away!

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Nay, let me alone for swearing.

75 III / 4
  • Pox on't, I'll not meddle with him.
  • Pox on't, I'll not meddle with him.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Why, man, he's a very devil; I have not seen such a
    firago. I had a pass with him, rapier, scabbard and
    all, and he gives me the stuck in with such a mortal
    motion, that it is inevitable; and on the answer, he
    pays you as surely as your feet hit the ground they
    step on. They say he has been fencer to the Sophy.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Pox on't, I'll not meddle with him.

76 III / 4
  • Plague on't, an I thought he had been valiant and so
    cunning in fence, I'ld...
  • Plague on't, an I thought he had been valiant and so
    cunning in fence, I'ld have seen him damned ere I'ld
    have challenged him. Let him let the matter slip,
    and I'll give him my horse, grey Capilet.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Ay, but he will not now be pacified: Fabian can
    scarce hold him yonder.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Plague on't, an I thought he had been valiant and so
    cunning in fence, I'ld have seen him damned ere I'ld
    have challenged him. Let him let the matter slip,
    and I'll give him my horse, grey Capilet.

77 III / 4
  • Pray God, he keep his oath!
  • Pray God, he keep his oath!
  • Sir Toby Belch. Come, Sir Andrew, there's no remedy; the gentleman
    will, for his honour's sake, have one bout with you;
    he cannot by the duello avoid it: but he has
    promised me, as he is a gentleman and a soldier, he
    will not hurt you. Come on; to't.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Pray God, he keep his oath!

78 III / 4
  • Marry, will I, sir; and, for that I promised you,
    I'll be as good as my word...
  • Marry, will I, sir; and, for that I promised you,
    I'll be as good as my word: he will bear you easily
    and reins well.
  • Viola. Pray, sir, put your sword up, if you please.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Marry, will I, sir; and, for that I promised you,
    I'll be as good as my word: he will bear you easily
    and reins well.

79 III / 4
  • 'Slid, I'll after him again and beat him.
  • 'Slid, I'll after him again and beat him.
  • Fabian. A coward, a most devout coward, religious in it.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. 'Slid, I'll after him again and beat him.

80 III / 4
  • An I do not,--
  • An I do not,--
  • Sir Toby Belch. Do; cuff him soundly, but never draw thy sword.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. An I do not,--

81 IV / 1
  • Now, sir, have I met you again? there's for you.
  • Now, sir, have I met you again? there's for you.
  • Feste. By my troth, thou hast an open hand. These wise men
    that give fools money get themselves a good
    report--after fourteen years' purchase.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Now, sir, have I met you again? there's for you.

82 IV / 1
  • Nay, let him alone: I'll go another way to work
    with him; I'll have an actio...
  • Nay, let him alone: I'll go another way to work
    with him; I'll have an action of battery against
    him, if there be any law in Illyria: though I
    struck him first, yet it's no matter for that.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Come on, sir; hold.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Nay, let him alone: I'll go another way to work
    with him; I'll have an action of battery against
    him, if there be any law in Illyria: though I
    struck him first, yet it's no matter for that.

83 V / 1
  • For the love of God, a surgeon! Send one presently
    to Sir Toby.
  • For the love of God, a surgeon! Send one presently
    to Sir Toby.
  • Olivia. O, do not swear!
    Hold little faith, though thou hast too much fear.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. For the love of God, a surgeon! Send one presently
    to Sir Toby.

84 V / 1
  • He has broke my head across and has given Sir Toby
    a bloody coxcomb too: for...
  • He has broke my head across and has given Sir Toby
    a bloody coxcomb too: for the love of God, your
    help! I had rather than forty pound I were at home.
  • Olivia. What's the matter?

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. He has broke my head across and has given Sir Toby
    a bloody coxcomb too: for the love of God, your
    help! I had rather than forty pound I were at home.

85 V / 1
  • The count's gentleman, one Cesario: we took him for
    a coward, but he's the v...
  • The count's gentleman, one Cesario: we took him for
    a coward, but he's the very devil incardinate.
  • Olivia. Who has done this, Sir Andrew?

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. The count's gentleman, one Cesario: we took him for
    a coward, but he's the very devil incardinate.

86 V / 1
  • 'Od's lifelings, here he is! You broke my head for
    nothing; and that that I...
  • 'Od's lifelings, here he is! You broke my head for
    nothing; and that that I did, I was set on to do't
    by Sir Toby.
  • Orsino. My gentleman, Cesario?

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. 'Od's lifelings, here he is! You broke my head for
    nothing; and that that I did, I was set on to do't
    by Sir Toby.

87 V / 1
  • If a bloody coxcomb be a hurt, you have hurt me: I
    think you set nothing by...
  • If a bloody coxcomb be a hurt, you have hurt me: I
    think you set nothing by a bloody coxcomb.
    [Enter SIR TOBY BELCH and Clown]
    Here comes Sir Toby halting; you shall hear more:
    but if he had not been in drink, he would have
    tickled you othergates than he did.
  • Viola. Why do you speak to me? I never hurt you:
    You drew your sword upon me without cause;
    But I bespoke you fair, and hurt you not.

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. If a bloody coxcomb be a hurt, you have hurt me: I
    think you set nothing by a bloody coxcomb.
    [Enter SIR TOBY BELCH and Clown]
    Here comes Sir Toby halting; you shall hear more:
    but if he had not been in drink, he would have
    tickled you othergates than he did.

88 V / 1
  • I'll help you, Sir Toby, because well be dressed together.
  • I'll help you, Sir Toby, because well be dressed together.
  • Olivia. Away with him! Who hath made this havoc with them?

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek. I'll help you, Sir Toby, because well be dressed together.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.