Speeches (Lines) for Ajax in "Troilus and Cressida"

Total: 55
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# Act, Scene, Line Speech text
1 II, 1, 858
  • Thersites!
  • Thersites!
  • (stage directions). [Enter AJAX and THERSITES]

    Ajax. Thersites!

2 II, 1, 861
  • Thersites!
  • Thersites!
  • Thersites. Agamemnon, how if he had boils? full, all over,
    generally?

    Ajax. Thersites!

3 II, 1, 864
  • Dog!
  • Dog!
  • Thersites. And those boils did run? say so: did not the
    general run then? were not that a botchy core?

    Ajax. Dog!

4 II, 1, 866
  • Thou bitch-wolf's son, canst thou not hear?
    [Beating him]
    Feel, then.
  • Thou bitch-wolf's son, canst thou not hear?
    [Beating him]
    Feel, then.
  • Thersites. Then would come some matter from him; I see none now.

    Ajax. Thou bitch-wolf's son, canst thou not hear?
    [Beating him]
    Feel, then.

5 II, 1, 871
  • Speak then, thou vinewedst leaven, speak: I will
    beat thee into handsomeness...
  • Speak then, thou vinewedst leaven, speak: I will
    beat thee into handsomeness.
  • Thersites. The plague of Greece upon thee, thou mongrel
    beef-witted lord!

    Ajax. Speak then, thou vinewedst leaven, speak: I will
    beat thee into handsomeness.

6 II, 1, 877
  • Toadstool, learn me the proclamation.
  • Toadstool, learn me the proclamation.
  • Thersites. I shall sooner rail thee into wit and holiness: but,
    I think, thy horse will sooner con an oration than
    thou learn a prayer without book. Thou canst strike,
    canst thou? a red murrain o' thy jade's tricks!

    Ajax. Toadstool, learn me the proclamation.

7 II, 1, 879
  • The proclamation!
  • The proclamation!
  • Thersites. Dost thou think I have no sense, thou strikest me thus?

    Ajax. The proclamation!

8 II, 1, 881
  • Do not, porpentine, do not: my fingers itch.
  • Do not, porpentine, do not: my fingers itch.
  • Thersites. Thou art proclaimed a fool, I think.

    Ajax. Do not, porpentine, do not: my fingers itch.

9 II, 1, 886
  • I say, the proclamation!
  • I say, the proclamation!
  • Thersites. I would thou didst itch from head to foot and I had
    the scratching of thee; I would make thee the
    loathsomest scab in Greece. When thou art forth in
    the incursions, thou strikest as slow as another.

    Ajax. I say, the proclamation!

10 II, 1, 891
  • Mistress Thersites!
  • Mistress Thersites!
  • Thersites. Thou grumblest and railest every hour on Achilles,
    and thou art as full of envy at his greatness as
    Cerberus is at Proserpine's beauty, ay, that thou
    barkest at him.

    Ajax. Mistress Thersites!

11 II, 1, 893
  • Cobloaf!
  • Cobloaf!
  • Thersites. Thou shouldest strike him.

    Ajax. Cobloaf!

12 II, 1, 896
  • [Beating him] You whoreson cur!
  • [Beating him] You whoreson cur!
  • Thersites. He would pun thee into shivers with his fist, as a
    sailor breaks a biscuit.

    Ajax. [Beating him] You whoreson cur!

13 II, 1, 898
  • Thou stool for a witch!
  • Thou stool for a witch!
  • Thersites. Do, do.

    Ajax. Thou stool for a witch!

14 II, 1, 907
  • You dog!
  • You dog!
  • Thersites. Ay, do, do; thou sodden-witted lord! thou hast no
    more brain than I have in mine elbows; an assinego
    may tutor thee: thou scurvy-valiant ass! thou art
    here but to thrash Trojans; and thou art bought and
    sold among those of any wit, like a barbarian slave.
    If thou use to beat me, I will begin at thy heel, and
    tell what thou art by inches, thou thing of no
    bowels, thou!

    Ajax. You dog!

15 II, 1, 909
  • [Beating him] You cur!
  • [Beating him] You cur!
  • Thersites. You scurvy lord!

    Ajax. [Beating him] You cur!

16 II, 1, 924
  • Therefore I beat thee.
  • Therefore I beat thee.
  • Thersites. Ay, but that fool knows not himself.

    Ajax. Therefore I beat thee.

17 II, 1, 944
  • O thou damned cur! I shall--
  • O thou damned cur! I shall--
  • Thersites. I would have peace and quietness, but the fool will
    not: he there: that he: look you there.

    Ajax. O thou damned cur! I shall--

18 II, 1, 949
  • I bade the vile owl go learn me the tenor of the
    proclamation, and he rails...
  • I bade the vile owl go learn me the tenor of the
    proclamation, and he rails upon me.
  • Achilles. What's the quarrel?

    Ajax. I bade the vile owl go learn me the tenor of the
    proclamation, and he rails upon me.

19 II, 1, 952
  • Well, go to, go to.
  • Well, go to, go to.
  • Thersites. I serve thee not.

    Ajax. Well, go to, go to.

20 II, 1, 967
  • I shall cut out your tongue.
  • I shall cut out your tongue.
  • Thersites. Yes, good sooth: to, Achilles! to, Ajax! to!

    Ajax. I shall cut out your tongue.

21 II, 1, 984
  • Farewell. Who shall answer him?
  • Farewell. Who shall answer him?
  • Achilles. Marry, this, sir, is proclaim'd through all our host:
    That Hector, by the fifth hour of the sun,
    Will with a trumpet 'twixt our tents and Troy
    To-morrow morning call some knight to arms
    That hath a stomach; and such a one that dare
    Maintain--I know not what: 'tis trash. Farewell.

    Ajax. Farewell. Who shall answer him?

22 II, 1, 987
  • O, meaning you. I will go learn more of it.
  • O, meaning you. I will go learn more of it.
  • Achilles. I know not: 'tis put to lottery; otherwise
    He knew his man.

    Ajax. O, meaning you. I will go learn more of it.

23 II, 3, 1303
  • Yes, lion-sick, sick of proud heart: you may call it
    melancholy, if you will...
  • Yes, lion-sick, sick of proud heart: you may call it
    melancholy, if you will favour the man; but, by my
    head, 'tis pride: but why, why? let him show us the
    cause. A word, my lord.
  • Ulysses. We saw him at the opening of his tent:
    He is not sick.

    Ajax. Yes, lion-sick, sick of proud heart: you may call it
    melancholy, if you will favour the man; but, by my
    head, 'tis pride: but why, why? let him show us the
    cause. A word, my lord.

24 II, 3, 1363
  • What is he more than another?
  • What is he more than another?
  • (stage directions). [Exit ULYSSES]

    Ajax. What is he more than another?

25 II, 3, 1365
  • Is he so much? Do you not think he thinks himself a
    better man than I am?
  • Is he so much? Do you not think he thinks himself a
    better man than I am?
  • Agamemnon. No more than what he thinks he is.

    Ajax. Is he so much? Do you not think he thinks himself a
    better man than I am?

26 II, 3, 1368
  • Will you subscribe his thought, and say he is?
  • Will you subscribe his thought, and say he is?
  • Agamemnon. No question.

    Ajax. Will you subscribe his thought, and say he is?

27 II, 3, 1372
  • Why should a man be proud? How doth pride grow? I
    know not what pride is.
  • Why should a man be proud? How doth pride grow? I
    know not what pride is.
  • Agamemnon. No, noble Ajax; you are as strong, as valiant, as
    wise, no less noble, much more gentle, and altogether
    more tractable.

    Ajax. Why should a man be proud? How doth pride grow? I
    know not what pride is.

28 II, 3, 1379
  • I do hate a proud man, as I hate the engendering of toads.
  • I do hate a proud man, as I hate the engendering of toads.
  • Agamemnon. Your mind is the clearer, Ajax, and your virtues the
    fairer. He that is proud eats up himself: pride is
    his own glass, his own trumpet, his own chronicle;
    and whatever praises itself but in the deed, devours
    the deed in the praise.

    Ajax. I do hate a proud man, as I hate the engendering of toads.

29 II, 3, 1426
  • If I go to him, with my armed fist I'll pash him o'er the face.
  • If I go to him, with my armed fist I'll pash him o'er the face.
  • Diomedes. [Aside to NESTOR] And how his silence drinks up
    this applause!

    Ajax. If I go to him, with my armed fist I'll pash him o'er the face.

30 II, 3, 1428
  • An a' be proud with me, I'll pheeze his pride:
    Let me go to him.
  • An a' be proud with me, I'll pheeze his pride:
    Let me go to him.
  • Agamemnon. O, no, you shall not go.

    Ajax. An a' be proud with me, I'll pheeze his pride:
    Let me go to him.

31 II, 3, 1431
  • A paltry, insolent fellow!
  • A paltry, insolent fellow!
  • Ulysses. Not for the worth that hangs upon our quarrel.

    Ajax. A paltry, insolent fellow!

32 II, 3, 1433
  • Can he not be sociable?
  • Can he not be sociable?
  • Nestor. How he describes himself!

    Ajax. Can he not be sociable?

33 II, 3, 1435
  • I'll let his humours blood.
  • I'll let his humours blood.
  • Ulysses. The raven chides blackness.

    Ajax. I'll let his humours blood.

34 II, 3, 1437
  • An all men were o' my mind,--
  • An all men were o' my mind,--
  • Agamemnon. He will be the physician that should be the patient.

    Ajax. An all men were o' my mind,--

35 II, 3, 1439
  • A' should not bear it so, a' should eat swords first:
    shall pride carry it?
  • A' should not bear it so, a' should eat swords first:
    shall pride carry it?
  • Ulysses. Wit would be out of fashion.

    Ajax. A' should not bear it so, a' should eat swords first:
    shall pride carry it?

36 II, 3, 1443
  • I will knead him; I'll make him supple.
  • I will knead him; I'll make him supple.
  • Ulysses. A' would have ten shares.

    Ajax. I will knead him; I'll make him supple.

37 II, 3, 1455
  • A whoreson dog, that shall pelter thus with us!
    Would he were a Trojan!
  • A whoreson dog, that shall pelter thus with us!
    Would he were a Trojan!
  • Ulysses. Know the whole world, he is as valiant.

    Ajax. A whoreson dog, that shall pelter thus with us!
    Would he were a Trojan!

38 II, 3, 1479
  • Shall I call you father?
  • Shall I call you father?
  • Ulysses. Thank the heavens, lord, thou art of sweet composure;
    Praise him that got thee, she that gave thee suck:
    Famed be thy tutor, and thy parts of nature
    Thrice famed, beyond all erudition:
    But he that disciplined thy arms to fight,
    Let Mars divide eternity in twain,
    And give him half: and, for thy vigour,
    Bull-bearing Milo his addition yield
    To sinewy Ajax. I will not praise thy wisdom,
    Which, like a bourn, a pale, a shore, confines
    Thy spacious and dilated parts: here's Nestor;
    Instructed by the antiquary times,
    He must, he is, he cannot but be wise:
    Put pardon, father Nestor, were your days
    As green as Ajax' and your brain so temper'd,
    You should not have the eminence of him,
    But be as Ajax.

    Ajax. Shall I call you father?

39 III, 3, 1935
  • How now, Patroclus!
  • How now, Patroclus!
  • Achilles. What, does the cuckold scorn me?

    Ajax. How now, Patroclus!

40 III, 3, 1937
  • Ha?
  • Ha?
  • Achilles. Good morrow, Ajax.

    Ajax. Ha?

41 III, 3, 1939
  • Ay, and good next day too.
  • Ay, and good next day too.
  • Achilles. Good morrow.

    Ajax. Ay, and good next day too.

42 IV, 5, 2601
  • Thou, trumpet, there's my purse.
    Now crack thy lungs, and split thy brazen p...
  • Thou, trumpet, there's my purse.
    Now crack thy lungs, and split thy brazen pipe:
    Blow, villain, till thy sphered bias cheek
    Outswell the colic of puff'd Aquilon:
    Come, stretch thy chest and let thy eyes spout blood;
    Thou blow'st for Hector.
  • Agamemnon. Here art thou in appointment fresh and fair,
    Anticipating time with starting courage.
    Give with thy trumpet a loud note to Troy,
    Thou dreadful Ajax; that the appalled air
    May pierce the head of the great combatant
    And hale him hither.

    Ajax. Thou, trumpet, there's my purse.
    Now crack thy lungs, and split thy brazen pipe:
    Blow, villain, till thy sphered bias cheek
    Outswell the colic of puff'd Aquilon:
    Come, stretch thy chest and let thy eyes spout blood;
    Thou blow'st for Hector.

43 IV, 5, 2737
  • I am not warm yet; let us fight again.
  • I am not warm yet; let us fight again.
  • Aeneas. Princes, enough, so please you.

    Ajax. I am not warm yet; let us fight again.

44 IV, 5, 2759
  • I thank thee, Hector
    Thou art too gentle and too free a man:
    I came to k...
  • I thank thee, Hector
    Thou art too gentle and too free a man:
    I came to kill thee, cousin, and bear hence
    A great addition earned in thy death.
  • Hector. Why, then will I no more:
    Thou art, great lord, my father's sister's son,
    A cousin-german to great Priam's seed;
    The obligation of our blood forbids
    A gory emulation 'twixt us twain:
    Were thy commixtion Greek and Trojan so
    That thou couldst say 'This hand is Grecian all,
    And this is Trojan; the sinews of this leg
    All Greek, and this all Troy; my mother's blood
    Runs on the dexter cheek, and this sinister
    Bounds in my father's;' by Jove multipotent,
    Thou shouldst not bear from me a Greekish member
    Wherein my sword had not impressure made
    Of our rank feud: but the just gods gainsay
    That any drop thou borrow'dst from thy mother,
    My sacred aunt, should by my mortal sword
    Be drain'd! Let me embrace thee, Ajax:
    By him that thunders, thou hast lusty arms;
    Hector would have them fall upon him thus:
    Cousin, all honour to thee!

    Ajax. I thank thee, Hector
    Thou art too gentle and too free a man:
    I came to kill thee, cousin, and bear hence
    A great addition earned in thy death.

45 IV, 5, 2771
  • If I might in entreaties find success--
    As seld I have the chance--I would d...
  • If I might in entreaties find success--
    As seld I have the chance--I would desire
    My famous cousin to our Grecian tents.
  • Hector. We'll answer it;
    The issue is embracement: Ajax, farewell.

    Ajax. If I might in entreaties find success--
    As seld I have the chance--I would desire
    My famous cousin to our Grecian tents.

46 IV, 5, 2781
  • Great Agamemnon comes to meet us here.
  • Great Agamemnon comes to meet us here.
  • Hector. AEneas, call my brother Troilus to me,
    And signify this loving interview
    To the expecters of our Trojan part;
    Desire them home. Give me thy hand, my cousin;
    I will go eat with thee and see your knights.

    Ajax. Great Agamemnon comes to meet us here.

47 IV, 5, 2890
  • Do not chafe thee, cousin:
    And you, Achilles, let these threats alone,
    T...
  • Do not chafe thee, cousin:
    And you, Achilles, let these threats alone,
    Till accident or purpose bring you to't:
    You may have every day enough of Hector
    If you have stomach; the general state, I fear,
    Can scarce entreat you to be odd with him.
  • Hector. Wert thou an oracle to tell me so,
    I'd not believe thee. Henceforth guard thee well;
    For I'll not kill thee there, nor there, nor there;
    But, by the forge that stithied Mars his helm,
    I'll kill thee every where, yea, o'er and o'er.
    You wisest Grecians, pardon me this brag;
    His insolence draws folly from my lips;
    But I'll endeavour deeds to match these words,
    Or may I never--

    Ajax. Do not chafe thee, cousin:
    And you, Achilles, let these threats alone,
    Till accident or purpose bring you to't:
    You may have every day enough of Hector
    If you have stomach; the general state, I fear,
    Can scarce entreat you to be odd with him.

48 V, 1, 3002
  • No, yonder 'tis;
    There, where we see the lights.
  • No, yonder 'tis;
    There, where we see the lights.
  • Agamemnon. We go wrong, we go wrong.

    Ajax. No, yonder 'tis;
    There, where we see the lights.

49 V, 1, 3005
  • No, not a whit.
  • No, not a whit.
  • Hector. I trouble you.

    Ajax. No, not a whit.

50 V, 5, 3501
  • Troilus! thou coward Troilus!
  • Troilus! thou coward Troilus!
  • (stage directions). [Enter AJAX]

    Ajax. Troilus! thou coward Troilus!

51 V, 6, 3512
  • Troilus, thou coward Troilus, show thy head!
  • Troilus, thou coward Troilus, show thy head!
  • (stage directions). [Enter AJAX]

    Ajax. Troilus, thou coward Troilus, show thy head!

52 V, 6, 3515
  • What wouldst thou?
  • What wouldst thou?
  • Diomedes. Troilus, I say! where's Troilus?

    Ajax. What wouldst thou?

53 V, 6, 3517
  • Were I the general, thou shouldst have my office
    Ere that correction. Troilu...
  • Were I the general, thou shouldst have my office
    Ere that correction. Troilus, I say! what, Troilus!
  • Diomedes. I would correct him.

    Ajax. Were I the general, thou shouldst have my office
    Ere that correction. Troilus, I say! what, Troilus!

54 V, 6, 3523
  • I'll fight with him alone: stand, Diomed.
  • I'll fight with him alone: stand, Diomed.
  • Diomedes. Ha, art thou there?

    Ajax. I'll fight with him alone: stand, Diomed.

55 V, 9, 3624
  • If it be so, yet bragless let it be;
    Great Hector was a man as good as he.
  • If it be so, yet bragless let it be;
    Great Hector was a man as good as he.
  • Diomedes. The bruit is, Hector's slain, and by Achilles.

    Ajax. If it be so, yet bragless let it be;
    Great Hector was a man as good as he.

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