Speeches (Lines) for Alcibiades in "The Tragedy of Timon of Athens"

Total: 39
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 1
  • Sir, you have saved my longing, and I feed
    Most hungerly on your sight.
  • Sir, you have saved my longing, and I feed
    Most hungerly on your sight.
  • Apemantus. So, so, there!
    Aches contract and starve your supple joints!
    That there should be small love 'mongst these
    sweet knaves,
    And all this courtesy! The strain of man's bred out
    Into baboon and monkey.

    Alcibiades. Sir, you have saved my longing, and I feed
    Most hungerly on your sight.

2 I / 2
  • My heart is ever at your service, my lord.
  • My heart is ever at your service, my lord.
  • Timon. Captain Alcibiades, your heart's in the field now.

    Alcibiades. My heart is ever at your service, my lord.

3 I / 2
  • So the were bleeding-new, my lord, there's no meat
    like 'em: I could wish my...
  • So the were bleeding-new, my lord, there's no meat
    like 'em: I could wish my best friend at such a feast.
  • Timon. You had rather be at a breakfast of enemies than a
    dinner of friends.

    Alcibiades. So the were bleeding-new, my lord, there's no meat
    like 'em: I could wish my best friend at such a feast.

4 I / 2
  • Ay, defiled land, my lord.
  • Ay, defiled land, my lord.
  • Timon. I take all and your several visitations
    So kind to heart, 'tis not enough to give;
    Methinks, I could deal kingdoms to my friends,
    And ne'er be weary. Alcibiades,
    Thou art a soldier, therefore seldom rich;
    It comes in charity to thee: for all thy living
    Is 'mongst the dead, and all the lands thou hast
    Lie in a pitch'd field.

    Alcibiades. Ay, defiled land, my lord.

5 III / 5
  • Honour, health, and compassion to the senate!
  • Honour, health, and compassion to the senate!
  • Second Senator. Most true; the law shall bruise him.

    Alcibiades. Honour, health, and compassion to the senate!

6 III / 5
  • I am an humble suitor to your virtues;
    For pity is the virtue of the law,
  • I am an humble suitor to your virtues;
    For pity is the virtue of the law,
    And none but tyrants use it cruelly.
    It pleases time and fortune to lie heavy
    Upon a friend of mine, who, in hot blood,
    Hath stepp'd into the law, which is past depth
    To those that, without heed, do plunge into 't.
    He is a man, setting his fate aside,
    Of comely virtues:
    Nor did he soil the fact with cowardice--
    An honour in him which buys out his fault--
    But with a noble fury and fair spirit,
    Seeing his reputation touch'd to death,
    He did oppose his foe:
    And with such sober and unnoted passion
    He did behave his anger, ere 'twas spent,
    As if he had but proved an argument.
  • First Senator. Now, captain?

    Alcibiades. I am an humble suitor to your virtues;
    For pity is the virtue of the law,
    And none but tyrants use it cruelly.
    It pleases time and fortune to lie heavy
    Upon a friend of mine, who, in hot blood,
    Hath stepp'd into the law, which is past depth
    To those that, without heed, do plunge into 't.
    He is a man, setting his fate aside,
    Of comely virtues:
    Nor did he soil the fact with cowardice--
    An honour in him which buys out his fault--
    But with a noble fury and fair spirit,
    Seeing his reputation touch'd to death,
    He did oppose his foe:
    And with such sober and unnoted passion
    He did behave his anger, ere 'twas spent,
    As if he had but proved an argument.

7 III / 5
  • My lord,--
  • My lord,--
  • First Senator. You undergo too strict a paradox,
    Striving to make an ugly deed look fair:
    Your words have took such pains as if they labour'd
    To bring manslaughter into form and set quarrelling
    Upon the head of valour; which indeed
    Is valour misbegot and came into the world
    When sects and factions were newly born:
    He's truly valiant that can wisely suffer
    The worst that man can breathe, and make his wrongs
    His outsides, to wear them like his raiment,
    carelessly,
    And ne'er prefer his injuries to his heart,
    To bring it into danger.
    If wrongs be evils and enforce us kill,
    What folly 'tis to hazard life for ill!

    Alcibiades. My lord,--

8 III / 5
  • My lords, then, under favour, pardon me,
    If I speak like a captain.
    Why...
  • My lords, then, under favour, pardon me,
    If I speak like a captain.
    Why do fond men expose themselves to battle,
    And not endure all threats? sleep upon't,
    And let the foes quietly cut their throats,
    Without repugnancy? If there be
    Such valour in the bearing, what make we
    Abroad? why then, women are more valiant
    That stay at home, if bearing carry it,
    And the ass more captain than the lion, the felon
    Loaden with irons wiser than the judge,
    If wisdom be in suffering. O my lords,
    As you are great, be pitifully good:
    Who cannot condemn rashness in cold blood?
    To kill, I grant, is sin's extremest gust;
    But, in defence, by mercy, 'tis most just.
    To be in anger is impiety;
    But who is man that is not angry?
    Weigh but the crime with this.
  • First Senator. You cannot make gross sins look clear:
    To revenge is no valour, but to bear.

    Alcibiades. My lords, then, under favour, pardon me,
    If I speak like a captain.
    Why do fond men expose themselves to battle,
    And not endure all threats? sleep upon't,
    And let the foes quietly cut their throats,
    Without repugnancy? If there be
    Such valour in the bearing, what make we
    Abroad? why then, women are more valiant
    That stay at home, if bearing carry it,
    And the ass more captain than the lion, the felon
    Loaden with irons wiser than the judge,
    If wisdom be in suffering. O my lords,
    As you are great, be pitifully good:
    Who cannot condemn rashness in cold blood?
    To kill, I grant, is sin's extremest gust;
    But, in defence, by mercy, 'tis most just.
    To be in anger is impiety;
    But who is man that is not angry?
    Weigh but the crime with this.

9 III / 5
  • In vain! his service done
    At Lacedaemon and Byzantium
    Were a sufficient...
  • In vain! his service done
    At Lacedaemon and Byzantium
    Were a sufficient briber for his life.
  • Second Senator. You breathe in vain.

    Alcibiades. In vain! his service done
    At Lacedaemon and Byzantium
    Were a sufficient briber for his life.

10 III / 5
  • I say, my lords, he has done fair service,
    And slain in fight many of your e...
  • I say, my lords, he has done fair service,
    And slain in fight many of your enemies:
    How full of valour did he bear himself
    In the last conflict, and made plenteous wounds!
  • First Senator. What's that?

    Alcibiades. I say, my lords, he has done fair service,
    And slain in fight many of your enemies:
    How full of valour did he bear himself
    In the last conflict, and made plenteous wounds!

11 III / 5
  • Hard fate! he might have died in war.
    My lords, if not for any parts in him-...
  • Hard fate! he might have died in war.
    My lords, if not for any parts in him--
    Though his right arm might purchase his own time
    And be in debt to none--yet, more to move you,
    Take my deserts to his, and join 'em both:
    And, for I know your reverend ages love
    Security, I'll pawn my victories, all
    My honours to you, upon his good returns.
    If by this crime he owes the law his life,
    Why, let the war receive 't in valiant gore
    For law is strict, and war is nothing more.
  • First Senator. He dies.

    Alcibiades. Hard fate! he might have died in war.
    My lords, if not for any parts in him--
    Though his right arm might purchase his own time
    And be in debt to none--yet, more to move you,
    Take my deserts to his, and join 'em both:
    And, for I know your reverend ages love
    Security, I'll pawn my victories, all
    My honours to you, upon his good returns.
    If by this crime he owes the law his life,
    Why, let the war receive 't in valiant gore
    For law is strict, and war is nothing more.

12 III / 5
  • Must it be so? it must not be. My lords,
    I do beseech you, know me.
  • Must it be so? it must not be. My lords,
    I do beseech you, know me.
  • First Senator. We are for law: he dies; urge it no more,
    On height of our displeasure: friend or brother,
    He forfeits his own blood that spills another.

    Alcibiades. Must it be so? it must not be. My lords,
    I do beseech you, know me.

13 III / 5
  • Call me to your remembrances.
  • Call me to your remembrances.
  • Second Senator. How!

    Alcibiades. Call me to your remembrances.

14 III / 5
  • I cannot think but your age has forgot me;
    It could not else be, I should pr...
  • I cannot think but your age has forgot me;
    It could not else be, I should prove so base,
    To sue, and be denied such common grace:
    My wounds ache at you.
  • Third Senator. What!

    Alcibiades. I cannot think but your age has forgot me;
    It could not else be, I should prove so base,
    To sue, and be denied such common grace:
    My wounds ache at you.

15 III / 5
  • Banish me!
    Banish your dotage; banish usury,
    That makes the senate ugly....
  • Banish me!
    Banish your dotage; banish usury,
    That makes the senate ugly.
  • First Senator. Do you dare our anger?
    'Tis in few words, but spacious in effect;
    We banish thee for ever.

    Alcibiades. Banish me!
    Banish your dotage; banish usury,
    That makes the senate ugly.

16 III / 5
  • Now the gods keep you old enough; that you may live
    Only in bone, that none...
  • Now the gods keep you old enough; that you may live
    Only in bone, that none may look on you!
    I'm worse than mad: I have kept back their foes,
    While they have told their money and let out
    Their coin upon large interest, I myself
    Rich only in large hurts. All those for this?
    Is this the balsam that the usuring senate
    Pours into captains' wounds? Banishment!
    It comes not ill; I hate not to be banish'd;
    It is a cause worthy my spleen and fury,
    That I may strike at Athens. I'll cheer up
    My discontented troops, and lay for hearts.
    'Tis honour with most lands to be at odds;
    Soldiers should brook as little wrongs as gods.
  • First Senator. If, after two days' shine, Athens contain thee,
    Attend our weightier judgment. And, not to swell
    our spirit,
    He shall be executed presently.

    Alcibiades. Now the gods keep you old enough; that you may live
    Only in bone, that none may look on you!
    I'm worse than mad: I have kept back their foes,
    While they have told their money and let out
    Their coin upon large interest, I myself
    Rich only in large hurts. All those for this?
    Is this the balsam that the usuring senate
    Pours into captains' wounds? Banishment!
    It comes not ill; I hate not to be banish'd;
    It is a cause worthy my spleen and fury,
    That I may strike at Athens. I'll cheer up
    My discontented troops, and lay for hearts.
    'Tis honour with most lands to be at odds;
    Soldiers should brook as little wrongs as gods.

17 IV / 3
  • What art thou there? speak.
  • What art thou there? speak.
  • Timon. O blessed breeding sun, draw from the earth
    Rotten humidity; below thy sister's orb
    Infect the air! Twinn'd brothers of one womb,
    Whose procreation, residence, and birth,
    Scarce is dividant, touch them with several fortunes;
    The greater scorns the lesser: not nature,
    To whom all sores lay siege, can bear great fortune,
    But by contempt of nature.
    Raise me this beggar, and deny 't that lord;
    The senator shall bear contempt hereditary,
    The beggar native honour.
    It is the pasture lards the rother's sides,
    The want that makes him lean. Who dares, who dares,
    In purity of manhood stand upright,
    And say 'This man's a flatterer?' if one be,
    So are they all; for every grise of fortune
    Is smooth'd by that below: the learned pate
    Ducks to the golden fool: all is oblique;
    There's nothing level in our cursed natures,
    But direct villany. Therefore, be abhorr'd
    All feasts, societies, and throngs of men!
    His semblable, yea, himself, Timon disdains:
    Destruction fang mankind! Earth, yield me roots!
    [Digging]
    Who seeks for better of thee, sauce his palate
    With thy most operant poison! What is here?
    Gold? yellow, glittering, precious gold? No, gods,
    I am no idle votarist: roots, you clear heavens!
    Thus much of this will make black white, foul fair,
    Wrong right, base noble, old young, coward valiant.
    Ha, you gods! why this? what this, you gods? Why, this
    Will lug your priests and servants from your sides,
    Pluck stout men's pillows from below their heads:
    This yellow slave
    Will knit and break religions, bless the accursed,
    Make the hoar leprosy adored, place thieves
    And give them title, knee and approbation
    With senators on the bench: this is it
    That makes the wappen'd widow wed again;
    She, whom the spital-house and ulcerous sores
    Would cast the gorge at, this embalms and spices
    To the April day again. Come, damned earth,
    Thou common whore of mankind, that put'st odds
    Among the route of nations, I will make thee
    Do thy right nature.
    [March afar off]
    Ha! a drum? Thou'rt quick,
    But yet I'll bury thee: thou'lt go, strong thief,
    When gouty keepers of thee cannot stand.
    Nay, stay thou out for earnest.
    [Keeping some gold]
    [Enter ALCIBIADES, with drum and fife, in]
    warlike manner; PHRYNIA and TIMANDRA]

    Alcibiades. What art thou there? speak.

18 IV / 3
  • What is thy name? Is man so hateful to thee,
    That art thyself a man?
  • What is thy name? Is man so hateful to thee,
    That art thyself a man?
  • Timon. A beast, as thou art. The canker gnaw thy heart,
    For showing me again the eyes of man!

    Alcibiades. What is thy name? Is man so hateful to thee,
    That art thyself a man?

19 IV / 3
  • I know thee well;
    But in thy fortunes am unlearn'd and strange.
  • I know thee well;
    But in thy fortunes am unlearn'd and strange.
  • Timon. I am Misanthropos, and hate mankind.
    For thy part, I do wish thou wert a dog,
    That I might love thee something.

    Alcibiades. I know thee well;
    But in thy fortunes am unlearn'd and strange.

20 IV / 3
  • How came the noble Timon to this change?
  • How came the noble Timon to this change?
  • Timon. I will not kiss thee; then the rot returns
    To thine own lips again.

    Alcibiades. How came the noble Timon to this change?

21 IV / 3
  • Noble Timon,
    What friendship may I do thee?
  • Noble Timon,
    What friendship may I do thee?
  • Timon. As the moon does, by wanting light to give:
    But then renew I could not, like the moon;
    There were no suns to borrow of.

    Alcibiades. Noble Timon,
    What friendship may I do thee?

22 IV / 3
  • What is it, Timon?
  • What is it, Timon?
  • Timon. None, but to
    Maintain my opinion.

    Alcibiades. What is it, Timon?

23 IV / 3
  • I have heard in some sort of thy miseries.
  • I have heard in some sort of thy miseries.
  • Timon. Promise me friendship, but perform none: if thou
    wilt not promise, the gods plague thee, for thou art
    a man! if thou dost perform, confound thee, for
    thou art a man!

    Alcibiades. I have heard in some sort of thy miseries.

24 IV / 3
  • I see them now; then was a blessed time.
  • I see them now; then was a blessed time.
  • Timon. Thou saw'st them, when I had prosperity.

    Alcibiades. I see them now; then was a blessed time.

25 IV / 3
  • Pardon him, sweet Timandra; for his wits
    Are drown'd and lost in his calamit...
  • Pardon him, sweet Timandra; for his wits
    Are drown'd and lost in his calamities.
    I have but little gold of late, brave Timon,
    The want whereof doth daily make revolt
    In my penurious band: I have heard, and grieved,
    How cursed Athens, mindless of thy worth,
    Forgetting thy great deeds, when neighbour states,
    But for thy sword and fortune, trod upon them,--
  • Timandra. Hang thee, monster!

    Alcibiades. Pardon him, sweet Timandra; for his wits
    Are drown'd and lost in his calamities.
    I have but little gold of late, brave Timon,
    The want whereof doth daily make revolt
    In my penurious band: I have heard, and grieved,
    How cursed Athens, mindless of thy worth,
    Forgetting thy great deeds, when neighbour states,
    But for thy sword and fortune, trod upon them,--

26 IV / 3
  • I am thy friend, and pity thee, dear Timon.
  • I am thy friend, and pity thee, dear Timon.
  • Timon. I prithee, beat thy drum, and get thee gone.

    Alcibiades. I am thy friend, and pity thee, dear Timon.

27 IV / 3
  • Why, fare thee well:
    Here is some gold for thee.
  • Why, fare thee well:
    Here is some gold for thee.
  • Timon. How dost thou pity him whom thou dost trouble?
    I had rather be alone.

    Alcibiades. Why, fare thee well:
    Here is some gold for thee.

28 IV / 3
  • When I have laid proud Athens on a heap,--
  • When I have laid proud Athens on a heap,--
  • Timon. Keep it, I cannot eat it.

    Alcibiades. When I have laid proud Athens on a heap,--

29 IV / 3
  • Ay, Timon, and have cause.
  • Ay, Timon, and have cause.
  • Timon. Warr'st thou 'gainst Athens?

    Alcibiades. Ay, Timon, and have cause.

30 IV / 3
  • Why me, Timon?
  • Why me, Timon?
  • Timon. The gods confound them all in thy conquest;
    And thee after, when thou hast conquer'd!

    Alcibiades. Why me, Timon?

31 IV / 3
  • Hast thou gold yet? I'll take the gold thou
    givest me,
    Not all thy couns...
  • Hast thou gold yet? I'll take the gold thou
    givest me,
    Not all thy counsel.
  • Timon. That, by killing of villains,
    Thou wast born to conquer my country.
    Put up thy gold: go on,--here's gold,--go on;
    Be as a planetary plague, when Jove
    Will o'er some high-viced city hang his poison
    In the sick air: let not thy sword skip one:
    Pity not honour'd age for his white beard;
    He is an usurer: strike me the counterfeit matron;
    It is her habit only that is honest,
    Herself's a bawd: let not the virgin's cheek
    Make soft thy trenchant sword; for those milk-paps,
    That through the window-bars bore at men's eyes,
    Are not within the leaf of pity writ,
    But set them down horrible traitors: spare not the babe,
    Whose dimpled smiles from fools exhaust their mercy;
    Think it a bastard, whom the oracle
    Hath doubtfully pronounced thy throat shall cut,
    And mince it sans remorse: swear against objects;
    Put armour on thine ears and on thine eyes;
    Whose proof, nor yells of mothers, maids, nor babes,
    Nor sight of priests in holy vestments bleeding,
    Shall pierce a jot. There's gold to pay soldiers:
    Make large confusion; and, thy fury spent,
    Confounded be thyself! Speak not, be gone.

    Alcibiades. Hast thou gold yet? I'll take the gold thou
    givest me,
    Not all thy counsel.

32 IV / 3
  • Strike up the drum towards Athens! Farewell, Timon:
    If I thrive well, I'll v...
  • Strike up the drum towards Athens! Farewell, Timon:
    If I thrive well, I'll visit thee again.
  • Timon. More whore, more mischief first; I have given you earnest.

    Alcibiades. Strike up the drum towards Athens! Farewell, Timon:
    If I thrive well, I'll visit thee again.

33 IV / 3
  • I never did thee harm.
  • I never did thee harm.
  • Timon. If I hope well, I'll never see thee more.

    Alcibiades. I never did thee harm.

34 IV / 3
  • Call'st thou that harm?
  • Call'st thou that harm?
  • Timon. Yes, thou spokest well of me.

    Alcibiades. Call'st thou that harm?

35 IV / 3
  • We but offend him. Strike!
    [Drum beats. Exeunt ALCIBIADES, PHRYNIA,]
    and...
  • We but offend him. Strike!
    [Drum beats. Exeunt ALCIBIADES, PHRYNIA,]
    and TIMANDRA]
  • Timon. Men daily find it. Get thee away, and take
    Thy beagles with thee.

    Alcibiades. We but offend him. Strike!
    [Drum beats. Exeunt ALCIBIADES, PHRYNIA,]
    and TIMANDRA]

36 V / 4
  • Sound to this coward and lascivious town
    Our terrible approach.
    [A parle...
  • Sound to this coward and lascivious town
    Our terrible approach.
    [A parley sounded]
    [Enter Senators on the walls]
    Till now you have gone on and fill'd the time
    With all licentious measure, making your wills
    The scope of justice; till now myself and such
    As slept within the shadow of your power
    Have wander'd with our traversed arms and breathed
    Our sufferance vainly: now the time is flush,
    When crouching marrow in the bearer strong
    Cries of itself 'No more:' now breathless wrong
    Shall sit and pant in your great chairs of ease,
    And pursy insolence shall break his wind
    With fear and horrid flight.
  • Soldier. By all description this should be the place.
    Who's here? speak, ho! No answer! What is this?
    Timon is dead, who hath outstretch'd his span:
    Some beast rear'd this; there does not live a man.
    Dead, sure; and this his grave. What's on this tomb
    I cannot read; the character I'll take with wax:
    Our captain hath in every figure skill,
    An aged interpreter, though young in days:
    Before proud Athens he's set down by this,
    Whose fall the mark of his ambition is.

    Alcibiades. Sound to this coward and lascivious town
    Our terrible approach.
    [A parley sounded]
    [Enter Senators on the walls]
    Till now you have gone on and fill'd the time
    With all licentious measure, making your wills
    The scope of justice; till now myself and such
    As slept within the shadow of your power
    Have wander'd with our traversed arms and breathed
    Our sufferance vainly: now the time is flush,
    When crouching marrow in the bearer strong
    Cries of itself 'No more:' now breathless wrong
    Shall sit and pant in your great chairs of ease,
    And pursy insolence shall break his wind
    With fear and horrid flight.

37 V / 4
  • Then there's my glove;
    Descend, and open your uncharged ports:
    Those ene...
  • Then there's my glove;
    Descend, and open your uncharged ports:
    Those enemies of Timon's and mine own
    Whom you yourselves shall set out for reproof
    Fall and no more: and, to atone your fears
    With my more noble meaning, not a man
    Shall pass his quarter, or offend the stream
    Of regular justice in your city's bounds,
    But shall be render'd to your public laws
    At heaviest answer.
  • Second Senator. Throw thy glove,
    Or any token of thine honour else,
    That thou wilt use the wars as thy redress
    And not as our confusion, all thy powers
    Shall make their harbour in our town, till we
    Have seal'd thy full desire.

    Alcibiades. Then there's my glove;
    Descend, and open your uncharged ports:
    Those enemies of Timon's and mine own
    Whom you yourselves shall set out for reproof
    Fall and no more: and, to atone your fears
    With my more noble meaning, not a man
    Shall pass his quarter, or offend the stream
    Of regular justice in your city's bounds,
    But shall be render'd to your public laws
    At heaviest answer.

38 V / 4
  • Descend, and keep your words.
  • Descend, and keep your words.
  • "Both". 'Tis most nobly spoken.

    Alcibiades. Descend, and keep your words.

39 V / 4
  • [Reads the epitaph] 'Here lies a
    wretched corse, of wretched soul bereft:
  • [Reads the epitaph] 'Here lies a
    wretched corse, of wretched soul bereft:
    Seek not my name: a plague consume you wicked
    caitiffs left!
    Here lie I, Timon; who, alive, all living men did hate:
    Pass by and curse thy fill, but pass and stay
    not here thy gait.'
    These well express in thee thy latter spirits:
    Though thou abhorr'dst in us our human griefs,
    Scorn'dst our brain's flow and those our
    droplets which
    From niggard nature fall, yet rich conceit
    Taught thee to make vast Neptune weep for aye
    On thy low grave, on faults forgiven. Dead
    Is noble Timon: of whose memory
    Hereafter more. Bring me into your city,
    And I will use the olive with my sword,
    Make war breed peace, make peace stint war, make each
    Prescribe to other as each other's leech.
    Let our drums strike.
  • Soldier. My noble general, Timon is dead;
    Entomb'd upon the very hem o' the sea;
    And on his grave-stone this insculpture, which
    With wax I brought away, whose soft impression
    Interprets for my poor ignorance.

    Alcibiades. [Reads the epitaph] 'Here lies a
    wretched corse, of wretched soul bereft:
    Seek not my name: a plague consume you wicked
    caitiffs left!
    Here lie I, Timon; who, alive, all living men did hate:
    Pass by and curse thy fill, but pass and stay
    not here thy gait.'
    These well express in thee thy latter spirits:
    Though thou abhorr'dst in us our human griefs,
    Scorn'dst our brain's flow and those our
    droplets which
    From niggard nature fall, yet rich conceit
    Taught thee to make vast Neptune weep for aye
    On thy low grave, on faults forgiven. Dead
    Is noble Timon: of whose memory
    Hereafter more. Bring me into your city,
    And I will use the olive with my sword,
    Make war breed peace, make peace stint war, make each
    Prescribe to other as each other's leech.
    Let our drums strike.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.