Speeches (Lines) for Antonio in "Much Ado About Nothing"

Total: 23
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 2
  • He is very busy about it. But, brother, I can tell
    you strange news that you...
  • He is very busy about it. But, brother, I can tell
    you strange news that you yet dreamt not of.
  • Leonato. How now, brother! Where is my cousin, your son?
    hath he provided this music?

    Antonio. He is very busy about it. But, brother, I can tell
    you strange news that you yet dreamt not of.

2 I / 2
  • As the event stamps them: but they have a good
    cover; they show well outward...
  • As the event stamps them: but they have a good
    cover; they show well outward. The prince and Count
    Claudio, walking in a thick-pleached alley in mine
    orchard, were thus much overheard by a man of mine:
    the prince discovered to Claudio that he loved my
    niece your daughter and meant to acknowledge it
    this night in a dance: and if he found her
    accordant, he meant to take the present time by the
    top and instantly break with you of it.
  • Leonato. Are they good?

    Antonio. As the event stamps them: but they have a good
    cover; they show well outward. The prince and Count
    Claudio, walking in a thick-pleached alley in mine
    orchard, were thus much overheard by a man of mine:
    the prince discovered to Claudio that he loved my
    niece your daughter and meant to acknowledge it
    this night in a dance: and if he found her
    accordant, he meant to take the present time by the
    top and instantly break with you of it.

3 I / 2
  • A good sharp fellow: I will send for him; and
    question him yourself.
  • A good sharp fellow: I will send for him; and
    question him yourself.
  • Leonato. Hath the fellow any wit that told you this?

    Antonio. A good sharp fellow: I will send for him; and
    question him yourself.

4 II / 1
  • I saw him not.
  • I saw him not.
  • Leonato. Was not Count John here at supper?

    Antonio. I saw him not.

5 II / 1
  • In faith, she's too curst.
  • In faith, she's too curst.
  • Leonato. By my troth, niece, thou wilt never get thee a
    husband, if thou be so shrewd of thy tongue.

    Antonio. In faith, she's too curst.

6 II / 1
  • [To HERO] Well, niece, I trust you will be ruled
    by your father.
  • [To HERO] Well, niece, I trust you will be ruled
    by your father.
  • Beatrice. No, but to the gate; and there will the devil meet
    me, like an old cuckold, with horns on his head, and
    say 'Get you to heaven, Beatrice, get you to
    heaven; here's no place for you maids:' so deliver
    I up my apes, and away to Saint Peter for the
    heavens; he shows me where the bachelors sit, and
    there live we as merry as the day is long.

    Antonio. [To HERO] Well, niece, I trust you will be ruled
    by your father.

7 II / 1
  • At a word, I am not.
  • At a word, I am not.
  • Ursula. I know you well enough; you are Signior Antonio.

    Antonio. At a word, I am not.

8 II / 1
  • To tell you true, I counterfeit him.
  • To tell you true, I counterfeit him.
  • Ursula. I know you by the waggling of your head.

    Antonio. To tell you true, I counterfeit him.

9 II / 1
  • At a word, I am not.
  • At a word, I am not.
  • Ursula. You could never do him so ill-well, unless you were
    the very man. Here's his dry hand up and down: you
    are he, you are he.

    Antonio. At a word, I am not.

10 V / 1
  • If you go on thus, you will kill yourself:
    And 'tis not wisdom thus to secon...
  • If you go on thus, you will kill yourself:
    And 'tis not wisdom thus to second grief
    Against yourself.
  • Dogberry. Dost thou not suspect my place? dost thou not
    suspect my years? O that he were here to write me
    down an ass! But, masters, remember that I am an
    ass; though it be not written down, yet forget not
    that I am an ass. No, thou villain, thou art full of
    piety, as shall be proved upon thee by good witness.
    I am a wise fellow, and, which is more, an officer,
    and, which is more, a householder, and, which is
    more, as pretty a piece of flesh as any is in
    Messina, and one that knows the law, go to; and a
    rich fellow enough, go to; and a fellow that hath
    had losses, and one that hath two gowns and every
    thing handsome about him. Bring him away. O that
    I had been writ down an ass!

    Antonio. If you go on thus, you will kill yourself:
    And 'tis not wisdom thus to second grief
    Against yourself.

11 V / 1
  • Therein do men from children nothing differ.
  • Therein do men from children nothing differ.
  • Leonato. I pray thee, cease thy counsel,
    Which falls into mine ears as profitless
    As water in a sieve: give not me counsel;
    Nor let no comforter delight mine ear
    But such a one whose wrongs do suit with mine.
    Bring me a father that so loved his child,
    Whose joy of her is overwhelm'd like mine,
    And bid him speak of patience;
    Measure his woe the length and breadth of mine
    And let it answer every strain for strain,
    As thus for thus and such a grief for such,
    In every lineament, branch, shape, and form:
    If such a one will smile and stroke his beard,
    Bid sorrow wag, cry 'hem!' when he should groan,
    Patch grief with proverbs, make misfortune drunk
    With candle-wasters; bring him yet to me,
    And I of him will gather patience.
    But there is no such man: for, brother, men
    Can counsel and speak comfort to that grief
    Which they themselves not feel; but, tasting it,
    Their counsel turns to passion, which before
    Would give preceptial medicine to rage,
    Fetter strong madness in a silken thread,
    Charm ache with air and agony with words:
    No, no; 'tis all men's office to speak patience
    To those that wring under the load of sorrow,
    But no man's virtue nor sufficiency
    To be so moral when he shall endure
    The like himself. Therefore give me no counsel:
    My griefs cry louder than advertisement.

    Antonio. Therein do men from children nothing differ.

12 V / 1
  • Yet bend not all the harm upon yourself;
    Make those that do offend you suffe...
  • Yet bend not all the harm upon yourself;
    Make those that do offend you suffer too.
  • Leonato. I pray thee, peace. I will be flesh and blood;
    For there was never yet philosopher
    That could endure the toothache patiently,
    However they have writ the style of gods
    And made a push at chance and sufferance.

    Antonio. Yet bend not all the harm upon yourself;
    Make those that do offend you suffer too.

13 V / 1
  • Here comes the prince and Claudio hastily.
  • Here comes the prince and Claudio hastily.
  • Leonato. There thou speak'st reason: nay, I will do so.
    My soul doth tell me Hero is belied;
    And that shall Claudio know; so shall the prince
    And all of them that thus dishonour her.

    Antonio. Here comes the prince and Claudio hastily.

14 V / 1
  • If he could right himself with quarreling,
    Some of us would lie low.
  • If he could right himself with quarreling,
    Some of us would lie low.
  • Don Pedro. Nay, do not quarrel with us, good old man.

    Antonio. If he could right himself with quarreling,
    Some of us would lie low.

15 V / 1
  • He shall kill two of us, and men indeed:
    But that's no matter; let him kill...
  • He shall kill two of us, and men indeed:
    But that's no matter; let him kill one first;
    Win me and wear me; let him answer me.
    Come, follow me, boy; come, sir boy, come, follow me:
    Sir boy, I'll whip you from your foining fence;
    Nay, as I am a gentleman, I will.
  • Leonato. Canst thou so daff me? Thou hast kill'd my child:
    If thou kill'st me, boy, thou shalt kill a man.

    Antonio. He shall kill two of us, and men indeed:
    But that's no matter; let him kill one first;
    Win me and wear me; let him answer me.
    Come, follow me, boy; come, sir boy, come, follow me:
    Sir boy, I'll whip you from your foining fence;
    Nay, as I am a gentleman, I will.

16 V / 1
  • Content yourself. God knows I loved my niece;
    And she is dead, slander'd to...
  • Content yourself. God knows I loved my niece;
    And she is dead, slander'd to death by villains,
    That dare as well answer a man indeed
    As I dare take a serpent by the tongue:
    Boys, apes, braggarts, Jacks, milksops!
  • Leonato. Brother,--

    Antonio. Content yourself. God knows I loved my niece;
    And she is dead, slander'd to death by villains,
    That dare as well answer a man indeed
    As I dare take a serpent by the tongue:
    Boys, apes, braggarts, Jacks, milksops!

17 V / 1
  • Hold you content. What, man! I know them, yea,
    And what they weigh, even to...
  • Hold you content. What, man! I know them, yea,
    And what they weigh, even to the utmost scruple,--
    Scrambling, out-facing, fashion-monging boys,
    That lie and cog and flout, deprave and slander,
    Go anticly, show outward hideousness,
    And speak off half a dozen dangerous words,
    How they might hurt their enemies, if they durst;
    And this is all.
  • Leonato. Brother Antony,--

    Antonio. Hold you content. What, man! I know them, yea,
    And what they weigh, even to the utmost scruple,--
    Scrambling, out-facing, fashion-monging boys,
    That lie and cog and flout, deprave and slander,
    Go anticly, show outward hideousness,
    And speak off half a dozen dangerous words,
    How they might hurt their enemies, if they durst;
    And this is all.

18 V / 1
  • Come, 'tis no matter:
    Do not you meddle; let me deal in this.
  • Come, 'tis no matter:
    Do not you meddle; let me deal in this.
  • Leonato. But, brother Antony,--

    Antonio. Come, 'tis no matter:
    Do not you meddle; let me deal in this.

19 V / 1
  • And shall, or some of us will smart for it.
  • And shall, or some of us will smart for it.
  • Leonato. No? Come, brother; away! I will be heard.

    Antonio. And shall, or some of us will smart for it.

20 V / 1
  • Farewell, my lords: we look for you to-morrow.
  • Farewell, my lords: we look for you to-morrow.
  • Leonato. Until to-morrow morning, lords, farewell.

    Antonio. Farewell, my lords: we look for you to-morrow.

21 V / 4
  • Well, I am glad that all things sort so well.
  • Well, I am glad that all things sort so well.
  • Leonato. So are the prince and Claudio, who accused her
    Upon the error that you heard debated:
    But Margaret was in some fault for this,
    Although against her will, as it appears
    In the true course of all the question.

    Antonio. Well, I am glad that all things sort so well.

22 V / 4
  • Which I will do with confirm'd countenance.
  • Which I will do with confirm'd countenance.
  • Leonato. Well, daughter, and you gentle-women all,
    Withdraw into a chamber by yourselves,
    And when I send for you, come hither mask'd.
    [Exeunt Ladies]
    The prince and Claudio promised by this hour
    To visit me. You know your office, brother:
    You must be father to your brother's daughter
    And give her to young Claudio.

    Antonio. Which I will do with confirm'd countenance.

23 V / 4
  • This same is she, and I do give you her.
  • This same is she, and I do give you her.
  • Claudio. For this I owe you: here comes other reckonings.
    [Re-enter ANTONIO, with the Ladies masked]
    Which is the lady I must seize upon?

    Antonio. This same is she, and I do give you her.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.