Speeches (Lines) for Antonio in "The Merchant of Venice"

Total: 47
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 1
  • In sooth, I know not why I am so sad:
    It wearies me; you say it wearies you;...
  • In sooth, I know not why I am so sad:
    It wearies me; you say it wearies you;
    But how I caught it, found it, or came by it,
    What stuff 'tis made of, whereof it is born,
    I am to learn;
    And such a want-wit sadness makes of me,
    That I have much ado to know myself.
  • .

    Antonio. In sooth, I know not why I am so sad:
    It wearies me; you say it wearies you;
    But how I caught it, found it, or came by it,
    What stuff 'tis made of, whereof it is born,
    I am to learn;
    And such a want-wit sadness makes of me,
    That I have much ado to know myself.

2 I / 1
  • Believe me, no: I thank my fortune for it,
    My ventures are not in one bottom...
  • Believe me, no: I thank my fortune for it,
    My ventures are not in one bottom trusted,
    Nor to one place; nor is my whole estate
    Upon the fortune of this present year:
    Therefore my merchandise makes me not sad.
  • Salarino. My wind cooling my broth
    Would blow me to an ague, when I thought
    What harm a wind too great at sea might do.
    I should not see the sandy hour-glass run,
    But I should think of shallows and of flats,
    And see my wealthy Andrew dock'd in sand,
    Vailing her high-top lower than her ribs
    To kiss her burial. Should I go to church
    And see the holy edifice of stone,
    And not bethink me straight of dangerous rocks,
    Which touching but my gentle vessel's side,
    Would scatter all her spices on the stream,
    Enrobe the roaring waters with my silks,
    And, in a word, but even now worth this,
    And now worth nothing? Shall I have the thought
    To think on this, and shall I lack the thought
    That such a thing bechanced would make me sad?
    But tell not me; I know, Antonio
    Is sad to think upon his merchandise.

    Antonio. Believe me, no: I thank my fortune for it,
    My ventures are not in one bottom trusted,
    Nor to one place; nor is my whole estate
    Upon the fortune of this present year:
    Therefore my merchandise makes me not sad.

3 I / 1
  • Fie, fie!
  • Fie, fie!
  • Salarino. Why, then you are in love.

    Antonio. Fie, fie!

4 I / 1
  • Your worth is very dear in my regard.
    I take it, your own business calls on...
  • Your worth is very dear in my regard.
    I take it, your own business calls on you
    And you embrace the occasion to depart.
  • Salarino. I would have stay'd till I had made you merry,
    If worthier friends had not prevented me.

    Antonio. Your worth is very dear in my regard.
    I take it, your own business calls on you
    And you embrace the occasion to depart.

5 I / 1
  • I hold the world but as the world, Gratiano;
    A stage where every man must pl...
  • I hold the world but as the world, Gratiano;
    A stage where every man must play a part,
    And mine a sad one.
  • Gratiano. You look not well, Signior Antonio;
    You have too much respect upon the world:
    They lose it that do buy it with much care:
    Believe me, you are marvellously changed.

    Antonio. I hold the world but as the world, Gratiano;
    A stage where every man must play a part,
    And mine a sad one.

6 I / 1
  • Farewell: I'll grow a talker for this gear.
  • Farewell: I'll grow a talker for this gear.
  • Gratiano. Well, keep me company but two years moe,
    Thou shalt not know the sound of thine own tongue.

    Antonio. Farewell: I'll grow a talker for this gear.

7 I / 1
  • Is that any thing now?
  • Is that any thing now?
  • Gratiano. Thanks, i' faith, for silence is only commendable
    In a neat's tongue dried and a maid not vendible.

    Antonio. Is that any thing now?

8 I / 1
  • Well, tell me now what lady is the same
    To whom you swore a secret pilgrimag...
  • Well, tell me now what lady is the same
    To whom you swore a secret pilgrimage,
    That you to-day promised to tell me of?
  • Bassanio. Gratiano speaks an infinite deal of nothing, more
    than any man in all Venice. His reasons are as two
    grains of wheat hid in two bushels of chaff: you
    shall seek all day ere you find them, and when you
    have them, they are not worth the search.

    Antonio. Well, tell me now what lady is the same
    To whom you swore a secret pilgrimage,
    That you to-day promised to tell me of?

9 I / 1
  • I pray you, good Bassanio, let me know it;
    And if it stand, as you yourself...
  • I pray you, good Bassanio, let me know it;
    And if it stand, as you yourself still do,
    Within the eye of honour, be assured,
    My purse, my person, my extremest means,
    Lie all unlock'd to your occasions.
  • Bassanio. 'Tis not unknown to you, Antonio,
    How much I have disabled mine estate,
    By something showing a more swelling port
    Than my faint means would grant continuance:
    Nor do I now make moan to be abridged
    From such a noble rate; but my chief care
    Is to come fairly off from the great debts
    Wherein my time something too prodigal
    Hath left me gaged. To you, Antonio,
    I owe the most, in money and in love,
    And from your love I have a warranty
    To unburden all my plots and purposes
    How to get clear of all the debts I owe.

    Antonio. I pray you, good Bassanio, let me know it;
    And if it stand, as you yourself still do,
    Within the eye of honour, be assured,
    My purse, my person, my extremest means,
    Lie all unlock'd to your occasions.

10 I / 1
  • You know me well, and herein spend but time
    To wind about my love with circu...
  • You know me well, and herein spend but time
    To wind about my love with circumstance;
    And out of doubt you do me now more wrong
    In making question of my uttermost
    Than if you had made waste of all I have:
    Then do but say to me what I should do
    That in your knowledge may by me be done,
    And I am prest unto it: therefore, speak.
  • Bassanio. In my school-days, when I had lost one shaft,
    I shot his fellow of the self-same flight
    The self-same way with more advised watch,
    To find the other forth, and by adventuring both
    I oft found both: I urge this childhood proof,
    Because what follows is pure innocence.
    I owe you much, and, like a wilful youth,
    That which I owe is lost; but if you please
    To shoot another arrow that self way
    Which you did shoot the first, I do not doubt,
    As I will watch the aim, or to find both
    Or bring your latter hazard back again
    And thankfully rest debtor for the first.

    Antonio. You know me well, and herein spend but time
    To wind about my love with circumstance;
    And out of doubt you do me now more wrong
    In making question of my uttermost
    Than if you had made waste of all I have:
    Then do but say to me what I should do
    That in your knowledge may by me be done,
    And I am prest unto it: therefore, speak.

11 I / 1
  • Thou know'st that all my fortunes are at sea;
    Neither have I money nor commo...
  • Thou know'st that all my fortunes are at sea;
    Neither have I money nor commodity
    To raise a present sum: therefore go forth;
    Try what my credit can in Venice do:
    That shall be rack'd, even to the uttermost,
    To furnish thee to Belmont, to fair Portia.
    Go, presently inquire, and so will I,
    Where money is, and I no question make
    To have it of my trust or for my sake.
  • Bassanio. In Belmont is a lady richly left;
    And she is fair, and, fairer than that word,
    Of wondrous virtues: sometimes from her eyes
    I did receive fair speechless messages:
    Her name is Portia, nothing undervalued
    To Cato's daughter, Brutus' Portia:
    Nor is the wide world ignorant of her worth,
    For the four winds blow in from every coast
    Renowned suitors, and her sunny locks
    Hang on her temples like a golden fleece;
    Which makes her seat of Belmont Colchos' strand,
    And many Jasons come in quest of her.
    O my Antonio, had I but the means
    To hold a rival place with one of them,
    I have a mind presages me such thrift,
    That I should questionless be fortunate!

    Antonio. Thou know'st that all my fortunes are at sea;
    Neither have I money nor commodity
    To raise a present sum: therefore go forth;
    Try what my credit can in Venice do:
    That shall be rack'd, even to the uttermost,
    To furnish thee to Belmont, to fair Portia.
    Go, presently inquire, and so will I,
    Where money is, and I no question make
    To have it of my trust or for my sake.

12 I / 3
  • Shylock, although I neither lend nor borrow
    By taking nor by giving of exces...
  • Shylock, although I neither lend nor borrow
    By taking nor by giving of excess,
    Yet, to supply the ripe wants of my friend,
    I'll break a custom. Is he yet possess'd
    How much ye would?
  • Shylock. I am debating of my present store,
    And, by the near guess of my memory,
    I cannot instantly raise up the gross
    Of full three thousand ducats. What of that?
    Tubal, a wealthy Hebrew of my tribe,
    Will furnish me. But soft! how many months
    Do you desire?
    [To ANTONIO]
    Rest you fair, good signior;
    Your worship was the last man in our mouths.

    Antonio. Shylock, although I neither lend nor borrow
    By taking nor by giving of excess,
    Yet, to supply the ripe wants of my friend,
    I'll break a custom. Is he yet possess'd
    How much ye would?

13 I / 3
  • And for three months.
  • And for three months.
  • Shylock. Ay, ay, three thousand ducats.

    Antonio. And for three months.

14 I / 3
  • I do never use it.
  • I do never use it.
  • Shylock. I had forgot; three months; you told me so.
    Well then, your bond; and let me see; but hear you;
    Methought you said you neither lend nor borrow
    Upon advantage.

    Antonio. I do never use it.

15 I / 3
  • And what of him? did he take interest?
  • And what of him? did he take interest?
  • Shylock. When Jacob grazed his uncle Laban's sheep--
    This Jacob from our holy Abram was,
    As his wise mother wrought in his behalf,
    The third possessor; ay, he was the third--

    Antonio. And what of him? did he take interest?

16 I / 3
  • This was a venture, sir, that Jacob served for;
    A thing not in his power to...
  • This was a venture, sir, that Jacob served for;
    A thing not in his power to bring to pass,
    But sway'd and fashion'd by the hand of heaven.
    Was this inserted to make interest good?
    Or is your gold and silver ewes and rams?
  • Shylock. No, not take interest, not, as you would say,
    Directly interest: mark what Jacob did.
    When Laban and himself were compromised
    That all the eanlings which were streak'd and pied
    Should fall as Jacob's hire, the ewes, being rank,
    In the end of autumn turned to the rams,
    And, when the work of generation was
    Between these woolly breeders in the act,
    The skilful shepherd peel'd me certain wands,
    And, in the doing of the deed of kind,
    He stuck them up before the fulsome ewes,
    Who then conceiving did in eaning time
    Fall parti-colour'd lambs, and those were Jacob's.
    This was a way to thrive, and he was blest:
    And thrift is blessing, if men steal it not.

    Antonio. This was a venture, sir, that Jacob served for;
    A thing not in his power to bring to pass,
    But sway'd and fashion'd by the hand of heaven.
    Was this inserted to make interest good?
    Or is your gold and silver ewes and rams?

17 I / 3
  • Mark you this, Bassanio,
    The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.
    A...
  • Mark you this, Bassanio,
    The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.
    An evil soul producing holy witness
    Is like a villain with a smiling cheek,
    A goodly apple rotten at the heart:
    O, what a goodly outside falsehood hath!
  • Shylock. I cannot tell; I make it breed as fast:
    But note me, signior.

    Antonio. Mark you this, Bassanio,
    The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.
    An evil soul producing holy witness
    Is like a villain with a smiling cheek,
    A goodly apple rotten at the heart:
    O, what a goodly outside falsehood hath!

18 I / 3
  • Well, Shylock, shall we be beholding to you?
  • Well, Shylock, shall we be beholding to you?
  • Shylock. Three thousand ducats; 'tis a good round sum.
    Three months from twelve; then, let me see; the rate--

    Antonio. Well, Shylock, shall we be beholding to you?

19 I / 3
  • I am as like to call thee so again,
    To spit on thee again, to spurn thee too...
  • I am as like to call thee so again,
    To spit on thee again, to spurn thee too.
    If thou wilt lend this money, lend it not
    As to thy friends; for when did friendship take
    A breed for barren metal of his friend?
    But lend it rather to thine enemy,
    Who, if he break, thou mayst with better face
    Exact the penalty.
  • Shylock. Signior Antonio, many a time and oft
    In the Rialto you have rated me
    About my moneys and my usances:
    Still have I borne it with a patient shrug,
    For sufferance is the badge of all our tribe.
    You call me misbeliever, cut-throat dog,
    And spit upon my Jewish gaberdine,
    And all for use of that which is mine own.
    Well then, it now appears you need my help:
    Go to, then; you come to me, and you say
    'Shylock, we would have moneys:' you say so;
    You, that did void your rheum upon my beard
    And foot me as you spurn a stranger cur
    Over your threshold: moneys is your suit
    What should I say to you? Should I not say
    'Hath a dog money? is it possible
    A cur can lend three thousand ducats?' Or
    Shall I bend low and in a bondman's key,
    With bated breath and whispering humbleness, Say this;
    'Fair sir, you spit on me on Wednesday last;
    You spurn'd me such a day; another time
    You call'd me dog; and for these courtesies
    I'll lend you thus much moneys'?

    Antonio. I am as like to call thee so again,
    To spit on thee again, to spurn thee too.
    If thou wilt lend this money, lend it not
    As to thy friends; for when did friendship take
    A breed for barren metal of his friend?
    But lend it rather to thine enemy,
    Who, if he break, thou mayst with better face
    Exact the penalty.

20 I / 3
  • Content, i' faith: I'll seal to such a bond
    And say there is much kindness i...
  • Content, i' faith: I'll seal to such a bond
    And say there is much kindness in the Jew.
  • Shylock. This kindness will I show.
    Go with me to a notary, seal me there
    Your single bond; and, in a merry sport,
    If you repay me not on such a day,
    In such a place, such sum or sums as are
    Express'd in the condition, let the forfeit
    Be nominated for an equal pound
    Of your fair flesh, to be cut off and taken
    In what part of your body pleaseth me.

    Antonio. Content, i' faith: I'll seal to such a bond
    And say there is much kindness in the Jew.

21 I / 3
  • Why, fear not, man; I will not forfeit it:
    Within these two months, that's a...
  • Why, fear not, man; I will not forfeit it:
    Within these two months, that's a month before
    This bond expires, I do expect return
    Of thrice three times the value of this bond.
  • Bassanio. You shall not seal to such a bond for me:
    I'll rather dwell in my necessity.

    Antonio. Why, fear not, man; I will not forfeit it:
    Within these two months, that's a month before
    This bond expires, I do expect return
    Of thrice three times the value of this bond.

22 I / 3
  • Yes Shylock, I will seal unto this bond.
  • Yes Shylock, I will seal unto this bond.
  • Shylock. O father Abram, what these Christians are,
    Whose own hard dealings teaches them suspect
    The thoughts of others! Pray you, tell me this;
    If he should break his day, what should I gain
    By the exaction of the forfeiture?
    A pound of man's flesh taken from a man
    Is not so estimable, profitable neither,
    As flesh of muttons, beefs, or goats. I say,
    To buy his favour, I extend this friendship:
    If he will take it, so; if not, adieu;
    And, for my love, I pray you wrong me not.

    Antonio. Yes Shylock, I will seal unto this bond.

23 I / 3
  • Hie thee, gentle Jew.
    [Exit Shylock]
    The Hebrew will turn Christian: he...
  • Hie thee, gentle Jew.
    [Exit Shylock]
    The Hebrew will turn Christian: he grows kind.
  • Shylock. Then meet me forthwith at the notary's;
    Give him direction for this merry bond,
    And I will go and purse the ducats straight,
    See to my house, left in the fearful guard
    Of an unthrifty knave, and presently
    I will be with you.

    Antonio. Hie thee, gentle Jew.
    [Exit Shylock]
    The Hebrew will turn Christian: he grows kind.

24 I / 3
  • Come on: in this there can be no dismay;
    My ships come home a month before t...
  • Come on: in this there can be no dismay;
    My ships come home a month before the day.
  • Bassanio. I like not fair terms and a villain's mind.

    Antonio. Come on: in this there can be no dismay;
    My ships come home a month before the day.

25 II / 6
  • Who's there?
  • Who's there?
  • Lorenzo. Beshrew me but I love her heartily;
    For she is wise, if I can judge of her,
    And fair she is, if that mine eyes be true,
    And true she is, as she hath proved herself,
    And therefore, like herself, wise, fair and true,
    Shall she be placed in my constant soul.
    [Enter JESSICA, below]
    What, art thou come? On, gentlemen; away!
    Our masquing mates by this time for us stay.

    Antonio. Who's there?

26 II / 6
  • Fie, fie, Gratiano! where are all the rest?
    'Tis nine o'clock: our friends a...
  • Fie, fie, Gratiano! where are all the rest?
    'Tis nine o'clock: our friends all stay for you.
    No masque to-night: the wind is come about;
    Bassanio presently will go aboard:
    I have sent twenty out to seek for you.
  • Gratiano. Signior Antonio!

    Antonio. Fie, fie, Gratiano! where are all the rest?
    'Tis nine o'clock: our friends all stay for you.
    No masque to-night: the wind is come about;
    Bassanio presently will go aboard:
    I have sent twenty out to seek for you.

27 III / 3
  • Hear me yet, good Shylock.
  • Hear me yet, good Shylock.
  • Shylock. Gaoler, look to him: tell not me of mercy;
    This is the fool that lent out money gratis:
    Gaoler, look to him.

    Antonio. Hear me yet, good Shylock.

28 III / 3
  • I pray thee, hear me speak.
  • I pray thee, hear me speak.
  • Shylock. I'll have my bond; speak not against my bond:
    I have sworn an oath that I will have my bond.
    Thou call'dst me dog before thou hadst a cause;
    But, since I am a dog, beware my fangs:
    The duke shall grant me justice. I do wonder,
    Thou naughty gaoler, that thou art so fond
    To come abroad with him at his request.

    Antonio. I pray thee, hear me speak.

29 III / 3
  • Let him alone:
    I'll follow him no more with bootless prayers.
    He seeks m...
  • Let him alone:
    I'll follow him no more with bootless prayers.
    He seeks my life; his reason well I know:
    I oft deliver'd from his forfeitures
    Many that have at times made moan to me;
    Therefore he hates me.
  • Salarino. It is the most impenetrable cur
    That ever kept with men.

    Antonio. Let him alone:
    I'll follow him no more with bootless prayers.
    He seeks my life; his reason well I know:
    I oft deliver'd from his forfeitures
    Many that have at times made moan to me;
    Therefore he hates me.

30 III / 3
  • The duke cannot deny the course of law:
    For the commodity that strangers hav...
  • The duke cannot deny the course of law:
    For the commodity that strangers have
    With us in Venice, if it be denied,
    Will much impeach the justice of his state;
    Since that the trade and profit of the city
    Consisteth of all nations. Therefore, go:
    These griefs and losses have so bated me,
    That I shall hardly spare a pound of flesh
    To-morrow to my bloody creditor.
    Well, gaoler, on. Pray God, Bassanio come
    To see me pay his debt, and then I care not!
  • Salarino. I am sure the duke
    Will never grant this forfeiture to hold.

    Antonio. The duke cannot deny the course of law:
    For the commodity that strangers have
    With us in Venice, if it be denied,
    Will much impeach the justice of his state;
    Since that the trade and profit of the city
    Consisteth of all nations. Therefore, go:
    These griefs and losses have so bated me,
    That I shall hardly spare a pound of flesh
    To-morrow to my bloody creditor.
    Well, gaoler, on. Pray God, Bassanio come
    To see me pay his debt, and then I care not!

31 IV / 1
  • Ready, so please your grace.
  • Ready, so please your grace.
  • Duke. What, is Antonio here?

    Antonio. Ready, so please your grace.

32 IV / 1
  • I have heard
    Your grace hath ta'en great pains to qualify
    His rigorous c...
  • I have heard
    Your grace hath ta'en great pains to qualify
    His rigorous course; but since he stands obdurate
    And that no lawful means can carry me
    Out of his envy's reach, I do oppose
    My patience to his fury, and am arm'd
    To suffer, with a quietness of spirit,
    The very tyranny and rage of his.
  • Duke. I am sorry for thee: thou art come to answer
    A stony adversary, an inhuman wretch
    uncapable of pity, void and empty
    From any dram of mercy.

    Antonio. I have heard
    Your grace hath ta'en great pains to qualify
    His rigorous course; but since he stands obdurate
    And that no lawful means can carry me
    Out of his envy's reach, I do oppose
    My patience to his fury, and am arm'd
    To suffer, with a quietness of spirit,
    The very tyranny and rage of his.

33 IV / 1
  • I pray you, think you question with the Jew:
    You may as well go stand upon t...
  • I pray you, think you question with the Jew:
    You may as well go stand upon the beach
    And bid the main flood bate his usual height;
    You may as well use question with the wolf
    Why he hath made the ewe bleat for the lamb;
    You may as well forbid the mountain pines
    To wag their high tops and to make no noise,
    When they are fretten with the gusts of heaven;
    You may as well do anything most hard,
    As seek to soften that--than which what's harder?--
    His Jewish heart: therefore, I do beseech you,
    Make no more offers, use no farther means,
    But with all brief and plain conveniency
    Let me have judgment and the Jew his will.
  • Shylock. What, wouldst thou have a serpent sting thee twice?

    Antonio. I pray you, think you question with the Jew:
    You may as well go stand upon the beach
    And bid the main flood bate his usual height;
    You may as well use question with the wolf
    Why he hath made the ewe bleat for the lamb;
    You may as well forbid the mountain pines
    To wag their high tops and to make no noise,
    When they are fretten with the gusts of heaven;
    You may as well do anything most hard,
    As seek to soften that--than which what's harder?--
    His Jewish heart: therefore, I do beseech you,
    Make no more offers, use no farther means,
    But with all brief and plain conveniency
    Let me have judgment and the Jew his will.

34 IV / 1
  • I am a tainted wether of the flock,
    Meetest for death: the weakest kind of f...
  • I am a tainted wether of the flock,
    Meetest for death: the weakest kind of fruit
    Drops earliest to the ground; and so let me
    You cannot better be employ'd, Bassanio,
    Than to live still and write mine epitaph.
  • Bassanio. Good cheer, Antonio! What, man, courage yet!
    The Jew shall have my flesh, blood, bones and all,
    Ere thou shalt lose for me one drop of blood.

    Antonio. I am a tainted wether of the flock,
    Meetest for death: the weakest kind of fruit
    Drops earliest to the ground; and so let me
    You cannot better be employ'd, Bassanio,
    Than to live still and write mine epitaph.

35 IV / 1
  • Ay, so he says.
  • Ay, so he says.
  • Portia. Of a strange nature is the suit you follow;
    Yet in such rule that the Venetian law
    Cannot impugn you as you do proceed.
    You stand within his danger, do you not?

    Antonio. Ay, so he says.

36 IV / 1
  • I do.
  • I do.
  • Portia. Do you confess the bond?

    Antonio. I do.

37 IV / 1
  • Most heartily I do beseech the court
    To give the judgment.
  • Most heartily I do beseech the court
    To give the judgment.
  • Shylock. When it is paid according to the tenor.
    It doth appear you are a worthy judge;
    You know the law, your exposition
    Hath been most sound: I charge you by the law,
    Whereof you are a well-deserving pillar,
    Proceed to judgment: by my soul I swear
    There is no power in the tongue of man
    To alter me: I stay here on my bond.

    Antonio. Most heartily I do beseech the court
    To give the judgment.

38 IV / 1
  • But little: I am arm'd and well prepared.
    Give me your hand, Bassanio: fare...
  • But little: I am arm'd and well prepared.
    Give me your hand, Bassanio: fare you well!
    Grieve not that I am fallen to this for you;
    For herein Fortune shows herself more kind
    Than is her custom: it is still her use
    To let the wretched man outlive his wealth,
    To view with hollow eye and wrinkled brow
    An age of poverty; from which lingering penance
    Of such misery doth she cut me off.
    Commend me to your honourable wife:
    Tell her the process of Antonio's end;
    Say how I loved you, speak me fair in death;
    And, when the tale is told, bid her be judge
    Whether Bassanio had not once a love.
    Repent but you that you shall lose your friend,
    And he repents not that he pays your debt;
    For if the Jew do cut but deep enough,
    I'll pay it presently with all my heart.
  • Portia. You, merchant, have you any thing to say?

    Antonio. But little: I am arm'd and well prepared.
    Give me your hand, Bassanio: fare you well!
    Grieve not that I am fallen to this for you;
    For herein Fortune shows herself more kind
    Than is her custom: it is still her use
    To let the wretched man outlive his wealth,
    To view with hollow eye and wrinkled brow
    An age of poverty; from which lingering penance
    Of such misery doth she cut me off.
    Commend me to your honourable wife:
    Tell her the process of Antonio's end;
    Say how I loved you, speak me fair in death;
    And, when the tale is told, bid her be judge
    Whether Bassanio had not once a love.
    Repent but you that you shall lose your friend,
    And he repents not that he pays your debt;
    For if the Jew do cut but deep enough,
    I'll pay it presently with all my heart.

39 IV / 1
  • So please my lord the duke and all the court
    To quit the fine for one half o...
  • So please my lord the duke and all the court
    To quit the fine for one half of his goods,
    I am content; so he will let me have
    The other half in use, to render it,
    Upon his death, unto the gentleman
    That lately stole his daughter:
    Two things provided more, that, for this favour,
    He presently become a Christian;
    The other, that he do record a gift,
    Here in the court, of all he dies possess'd,
    Unto his son Lorenzo and his daughter.
  • Gratiano. A halter gratis; nothing else, for God's sake.

    Antonio. So please my lord the duke and all the court
    To quit the fine for one half of his goods,
    I am content; so he will let me have
    The other half in use, to render it,
    Upon his death, unto the gentleman
    That lately stole his daughter:
    Two things provided more, that, for this favour,
    He presently become a Christian;
    The other, that he do record a gift,
    Here in the court, of all he dies possess'd,
    Unto his son Lorenzo and his daughter.

40 IV / 1
  • And stand indebted, over and above,
    In love and service to you evermore.
  • And stand indebted, over and above,
    In love and service to you evermore.
  • Bassanio. Most worthy gentleman, I and my friend
    Have by your wisdom been this day acquitted
    Of grievous penalties; in lieu whereof,
    Three thousand ducats, due unto the Jew,
    We freely cope your courteous pains withal.

    Antonio. And stand indebted, over and above,
    In love and service to you evermore.

41 IV / 1
  • My Lord Bassanio, let him have the ring:
    Let his deservings and my love with...
  • My Lord Bassanio, let him have the ring:
    Let his deservings and my love withal
    Be valued against your wife's commandment.
  • Portia. That 'scuse serves many men to save their gifts.
    An if your wife be not a mad-woman,
    And know how well I have deserved the ring,
    She would not hold out enemy for ever,
    For giving it to me. Well, peace be with you!

    Antonio. My Lord Bassanio, let him have the ring:
    Let his deservings and my love withal
    Be valued against your wife's commandment.

42 V / 1
  • No more than I am well acquitted of.
  • No more than I am well acquitted of.
  • Portia. You should in all sense be much bound to him.
    For, as I hear, he was much bound for you.

    Antonio. No more than I am well acquitted of.

43 V / 1
  • I am the unhappy subject of these quarrels.
  • I am the unhappy subject of these quarrels.
  • Gratiano. Well, do you so; let not me take him, then;
    For if I do, I'll mar the young clerk's pen.

    Antonio. I am the unhappy subject of these quarrels.

44 V / 1
  • I once did lend my body for his wealth;
    Which, but for him that had your hus...
  • I once did lend my body for his wealth;
    Which, but for him that had your husband's ring,
    Had quite miscarried: I dare be bound again,
    My soul upon the forfeit, that your lord
    Will never more break faith advisedly.
  • Bassanio. Nay, but hear me:
    Pardon this fault, and by my soul I swear
    I never more will break an oath with thee.

    Antonio. I once did lend my body for his wealth;
    Which, but for him that had your husband's ring,
    Had quite miscarried: I dare be bound again,
    My soul upon the forfeit, that your lord
    Will never more break faith advisedly.

45 V / 1
  • Here, Lord Bassanio; swear to keep this ring.
  • Here, Lord Bassanio; swear to keep this ring.
  • Portia. Then you shall be his surety. Give him this
    And bid him keep it better than the other.

    Antonio. Here, Lord Bassanio; swear to keep this ring.

46 V / 1
  • I am dumb.
  • I am dumb.
  • Portia. Speak not so grossly. You are all amazed:
    Here is a letter; read it at your leisure;
    It comes from Padua, from Bellario:
    There you shall find that Portia was the doctor,
    Nerissa there her clerk: Lorenzo here
    Shall witness I set forth as soon as you
    And even but now return'd; I have not yet
    Enter'd my house. Antonio, you are welcome;
    And I have better news in store for you
    Than you expect: unseal this letter soon;
    There you shall find three of your argosies
    Are richly come to harbour suddenly:
    You shall not know by what strange accident
    I chanced on this letter.

    Antonio. I am dumb.

47 V / 1
  • Sweet lady, you have given me life and living;
    For here I read for certain t...
  • Sweet lady, you have given me life and living;
    For here I read for certain that my ships
    Are safely come to road.
  • Bassanio. Sweet doctor, you shall be my bed-fellow:
    When I am absent, then lie with my wife.

    Antonio. Sweet lady, you have given me life and living;
    For here I read for certain that my ships
    Are safely come to road.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.