Speeches (Lines) for Bassianus in "Titus Andronicus"

Total: 14
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 1
  • Romans, friends, followers, favorers of my right,
    If ever Bassianus, Caesar'...
  • Romans, friends, followers, favorers of my right,
    If ever Bassianus, Caesar's son,
    Were gracious in the eyes of royal Rome,
    Keep then this passage to the Capitol
    And suffer not dishonour to approach
    The imperial seat, to virtue consecrate,
    To justice, continence and nobility;
    But let desert in pure election shine,
    And, Romans, fight for freedom in your choice.
  • Saturninus. Noble patricians, patrons of my right,
    Defend the justice of my cause with arms,
    And, countrymen, my loving followers,
    Plead my successive title with your swords:
    I am his first-born son, that was the last
    That wore the imperial diadem of Rome;
    Then let my father's honours live in me,
    Nor wrong mine age with this indignity.

    Bassianus. Romans, friends, followers, favorers of my right,
    If ever Bassianus, Caesar's son,
    Were gracious in the eyes of royal Rome,
    Keep then this passage to the Capitol
    And suffer not dishonour to approach
    The imperial seat, to virtue consecrate,
    To justice, continence and nobility;
    But let desert in pure election shine,
    And, Romans, fight for freedom in your choice.

2 I / 1
  • Marcus Andronicus, so I do ally
    In thy uprightness and integrity,
    And so...
  • Marcus Andronicus, so I do ally
    In thy uprightness and integrity,
    And so I love and honour thee and thine,
    Thy noble brother Titus and his sons,
    And her to whom my thoughts are humbled all,
    Gracious Lavinia, Rome's rich ornament,
    That I will here dismiss my loving friends,
    And to my fortunes and the people's favor
    Commit my cause in balance to be weigh'd.
  • Saturninus. How fair the tribune speaks to calm my thoughts!

    Bassianus. Marcus Andronicus, so I do ally
    In thy uprightness and integrity,
    And so I love and honour thee and thine,
    Thy noble brother Titus and his sons,
    And her to whom my thoughts are humbled all,
    Gracious Lavinia, Rome's rich ornament,
    That I will here dismiss my loving friends,
    And to my fortunes and the people's favor
    Commit my cause in balance to be weigh'd.

3 I / 1
  • Tribunes, and me, a poor competitor.
  • Tribunes, and me, a poor competitor.
  • Saturninus. Friends, that have been thus forward in my right,
    I thank you all and here dismiss you all,
    And to the love and favor of my country
    Commit myself, my person and the cause.
    [Exeunt the followers of SATURNINUS]
    Rome, be as just and gracious unto me
    As I am confident and kind to thee.
    Open the gates, and let me in.

    Bassianus. Tribunes, and me, a poor competitor.

4 I / 1
  • Andronicus, I do not flatter thee,
    But honour thee, and will do till I die:...
  • Andronicus, I do not flatter thee,
    But honour thee, and will do till I die:
    My faction if thou strengthen with thy friends,
    I will most thankful be; and thanks to men
    Of noble minds is honourable meed.
  • Titus Andronicus. Content thee, prince; I will restore to thee
    The people's hearts, and wean them from themselves.

    Bassianus. Andronicus, I do not flatter thee,
    But honour thee, and will do till I die:
    My faction if thou strengthen with thy friends,
    I will most thankful be; and thanks to men
    Of noble minds is honourable meed.

5 I / 1
  • Lord Titus, by your leave, this maid is mine.
  • Lord Titus, by your leave, this maid is mine.
  • Saturninus. Thanks, sweet Lavinia. Romans, let us go;
    Ransomless here we set our prisoners free:
    Proclaim our honours, lords, with trump and drum.

    Bassianus. Lord Titus, by your leave, this maid is mine.

6 I / 1
  • Ay, noble Titus; and resolved withal
    To do myself this reason and this right...
  • Ay, noble Titus; and resolved withal
    To do myself this reason and this right.
  • Titus Andronicus. How, sir! are you in earnest then, my lord?

    Bassianus. Ay, noble Titus; and resolved withal
    To do myself this reason and this right.

7 I / 1
  • By him that justly may
    Bear his betroth'd from all the world away.
  • By him that justly may
    Bear his betroth'd from all the world away.
  • Saturninus. Surprised! by whom?

    Bassianus. By him that justly may
    Bear his betroth'd from all the world away.

8 I / 1
  • And you of yours, my lord! I say no more,
    Nor wish no less; and so, I take m...
  • And you of yours, my lord! I say no more,
    Nor wish no less; and so, I take my leave.
  • Saturninus. So, Bassianus, you have play'd your prize:
    God give you joy, sir, of your gallant bride!

    Bassianus. And you of yours, my lord! I say no more,
    Nor wish no less; and so, I take my leave.

9 I / 1
  • Rape, call you it, my lord, to seize my own,
    My truth-betrothed love and now...
  • Rape, call you it, my lord, to seize my own,
    My truth-betrothed love and now my wife?
    But let the laws of Rome determine all;
    Meanwhile I am possess'd of that is mine.
  • Saturninus. Traitor, if Rome have law or we have power,
    Thou and thy faction shall repent this rape.

    Bassianus. Rape, call you it, my lord, to seize my own,
    My truth-betrothed love and now my wife?
    But let the laws of Rome determine all;
    Meanwhile I am possess'd of that is mine.

10 I / 1
  • My lord, what I have done, as best I may,
    Answer I must and shall do with my...
  • My lord, what I have done, as best I may,
    Answer I must and shall do with my life.
    Only thus much I give your grace to know:
    By all the duties that I owe to Rome,
    This noble gentleman, Lord Titus here,
    Is in opinion and in honour wrong'd;
    That in the rescue of Lavinia
    With his own hand did slay his youngest son,
    In zeal to you and highly moved to wrath
    To be controll'd in that he frankly gave:
    Receive him, then, to favor, Saturnine,
    That hath express'd himself in all his deeds
    A father and a friend to thee and Rome.
  • Saturninus. 'Tis good, sir: you are very short with us;
    But, if we live, we'll be as sharp with you.

    Bassianus. My lord, what I have done, as best I may,
    Answer I must and shall do with my life.
    Only thus much I give your grace to know:
    By all the duties that I owe to Rome,
    This noble gentleman, Lord Titus here,
    Is in opinion and in honour wrong'd;
    That in the rescue of Lavinia
    With his own hand did slay his youngest son,
    In zeal to you and highly moved to wrath
    To be controll'd in that he frankly gave:
    Receive him, then, to favor, Saturnine,
    That hath express'd himself in all his deeds
    A father and a friend to thee and Rome.

11 II / 2
  • Lavinia, how say you?
  • Lavinia, how say you?
  • Saturninus. And you have rung it lustily, my lord;
    Somewhat too early for new-married ladies.

    Bassianus. Lavinia, how say you?

12 II / 3
  • Who have we here? Rome's royal empress,
    Unfurnish'd of her well-beseeming tr...
  • Who have we here? Rome's royal empress,
    Unfurnish'd of her well-beseeming troop?
    Or is it Dian, habited like her,
    Who hath abandoned her holy groves
    To see the general hunting in this forest?
  • Aaron. No more, great empress; Bassianus comes:
    Be cross with him; and I'll go fetch thy sons
    To back thy quarrels, whatsoe'er they be.

    Bassianus. Who have we here? Rome's royal empress,
    Unfurnish'd of her well-beseeming troop?
    Or is it Dian, habited like her,
    Who hath abandoned her holy groves
    To see the general hunting in this forest?

13 II / 3
  • Believe me, queen, your swarth Cimmerian
    Doth make your honour of his body's...
  • Believe me, queen, your swarth Cimmerian
    Doth make your honour of his body's hue,
    Spotted, detested, and abominable.
    Why are you sequester'd from all your train,
    Dismounted from your snow-white goodly steed.
    And wander'd hither to an obscure plot,
    Accompanied but with a barbarous Moor,
    If foul desire had not conducted you?
  • Lavinia. Under your patience, gentle empress,
    'Tis thought you have a goodly gift in horning;
    And to be doubted that your Moor and you
    Are singled forth to try experiments:
    Jove shield your husband from his hounds to-day!
    'Tis pity they should take him for a stag.

    Bassianus. Believe me, queen, your swarth Cimmerian
    Doth make your honour of his body's hue,
    Spotted, detested, and abominable.
    Why are you sequester'd from all your train,
    Dismounted from your snow-white goodly steed.
    And wander'd hither to an obscure plot,
    Accompanied but with a barbarous Moor,
    If foul desire had not conducted you?

14 II / 3
  • The king my brother shall have note of this.
  • The king my brother shall have note of this.
  • Lavinia. And, being intercepted in your sport,
    Great reason that my noble lord be rated
    For sauciness. I pray you, let us hence,
    And let her joy her raven-colour'd love;
    This valley fits the purpose passing well.

    Bassianus. The king my brother shall have note of this.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.