Speeches (Lines) for Belarius in "Cymbeline, King of Britain"

Total: 58
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 III / 3
  • A goodly day not to keep house, with such
    Whose roof's as low as ours! Stoop...
  • A goodly day not to keep house, with such
    Whose roof's as low as ours! Stoop, boys; this gate
    Instructs you how to adore the heavens and bows you
    To a morning's holy office: the gates of monarchs
    Are arch'd so high that giants may jet through
    And keep their impious turbans on, without
    Good morrow to the sun. Hail, thou fair heaven!
    We house i' the rock, yet use thee not so hardly
    As prouder livers do.
  • Imogen. I see before me, man: nor here, nor here,
    Nor what ensues, but have a fog in them,
    That I cannot look through. Away, I prithee;
    Do as I bid thee: there's no more to say,
    Accessible is none but Milford way.

    Belarius. A goodly day not to keep house, with such
    Whose roof's as low as ours! Stoop, boys; this gate
    Instructs you how to adore the heavens and bows you
    To a morning's holy office: the gates of monarchs
    Are arch'd so high that giants may jet through
    And keep their impious turbans on, without
    Good morrow to the sun. Hail, thou fair heaven!
    We house i' the rock, yet use thee not so hardly
    As prouder livers do.

2 III / 3
  • Now for our mountain sport: up to yond hill;
    Your legs are young; I'll tread...
  • Now for our mountain sport: up to yond hill;
    Your legs are young; I'll tread these flats. Consider,
    When you above perceive me like a crow,
    That it is place which lessens and sets off;
    And you may then revolve what tales I have told you
    Of courts, of princes, of the tricks in war:
    This service is not service, so being done,
    But being so allow'd: to apprehend thus,
    Draws us a profit from all things we see;
    And often, to our comfort, shall we find
    The sharded beetle in a safer hold
    Than is the full-wing'd eagle. O, this life
    Is nobler than attending for a cheque,
    Richer than doing nothing for a bauble,
    Prouder than rustling in unpaid-for silk:
    Such gain the cap of him that makes 'em fine,
    Yet keeps his book uncross'd: no life to ours.
  • Arviragus. Hail, heaven!

    Belarius. Now for our mountain sport: up to yond hill;
    Your legs are young; I'll tread these flats. Consider,
    When you above perceive me like a crow,
    That it is place which lessens and sets off;
    And you may then revolve what tales I have told you
    Of courts, of princes, of the tricks in war:
    This service is not service, so being done,
    But being so allow'd: to apprehend thus,
    Draws us a profit from all things we see;
    And often, to our comfort, shall we find
    The sharded beetle in a safer hold
    Than is the full-wing'd eagle. O, this life
    Is nobler than attending for a cheque,
    Richer than doing nothing for a bauble,
    Prouder than rustling in unpaid-for silk:
    Such gain the cap of him that makes 'em fine,
    Yet keeps his book uncross'd: no life to ours.

3 III / 3
  • How you speak!
    Did you but know the city's usuries
    And felt them knowing...
  • How you speak!
    Did you but know the city's usuries
    And felt them knowingly; the art o' the court
    As hard to leave as keep; whose top to climb
    Is certain falling, or so slippery that
    The fear's as bad as falling; the toil o' the war,
    A pain that only seems to seek out danger
    I' the name of fame and honour; which dies i'
    the search,
    And hath as oft a slanderous epitaph
    As record of fair act; nay, many times,
    Doth ill deserve by doing well; what's worse,
    Must court'sy at the censure:--O boys, this story
    The world may read in me: my body's mark'd
    With Roman swords, and my report was once
    First with the best of note: Cymbeline loved me,
    And when a soldier was the theme, my name
    Was not far off: then was I as a tree
    Whose boughs did bend with fruit: but in one night,
    A storm or robbery, call it what you will,
    Shook down my mellow hangings, nay, my leaves,
    And left me bare to weather.
  • Arviragus. What should we speak of
    When we are old as you? when we shall hear
    The rain and wind beat dark December, how,
    In this our pinching cave, shall we discourse
    The freezing hours away? We have seen nothing;
    We are beastly, subtle as the fox for prey,
    Like warlike as the wolf for what we eat;
    Our valour is to chase what flies; our cage
    We make a quire, as doth the prison'd bird,
    And sing our bondage freely.

    Belarius. How you speak!
    Did you but know the city's usuries
    And felt them knowingly; the art o' the court
    As hard to leave as keep; whose top to climb
    Is certain falling, or so slippery that
    The fear's as bad as falling; the toil o' the war,
    A pain that only seems to seek out danger
    I' the name of fame and honour; which dies i'
    the search,
    And hath as oft a slanderous epitaph
    As record of fair act; nay, many times,
    Doth ill deserve by doing well; what's worse,
    Must court'sy at the censure:--O boys, this story
    The world may read in me: my body's mark'd
    With Roman swords, and my report was once
    First with the best of note: Cymbeline loved me,
    And when a soldier was the theme, my name
    Was not far off: then was I as a tree
    Whose boughs did bend with fruit: but in one night,
    A storm or robbery, call it what you will,
    Shook down my mellow hangings, nay, my leaves,
    And left me bare to weather.

4 III / 3
  • My fault being nothing--as I have told you oft--
    But that two villains, whos...
  • My fault being nothing--as I have told you oft--
    But that two villains, whose false oaths prevail'd
    Before my perfect honour, swore to Cymbeline
    I was confederate with the Romans: so
    Follow'd my banishment, and this twenty years
    This rock and these demesnes have been my world;
    Where I have lived at honest freedom, paid
    More pious debts to heaven than in all
    The fore-end of my time. But up to the mountains!
    This is not hunters' language: he that strikes
    The venison first shall be the lord o' the feast;
    To him the other two shall minister;
    And we will fear no poison, which attends
    In place of greater state. I'll meet you in the valleys.
    [Exeunt GUIDERIUS and ARVIRAGUS]
    How hard it is to hide the sparks of nature!
    These boys know little they are sons to the king;
    Nor Cymbeline dreams that they are alive.
    They think they are mine; and though train'd
    up thus meanly
    I' the cave wherein they bow, their thoughts do hit
    The roofs of palaces, and nature prompts them
    In simple and low things to prince it much
    Beyond the trick of others. This Polydore,
    The heir of Cymbeline and Britain, who
    The king his father call'd Guiderius,--Jove!
    When on my three-foot stool I sit and tell
    The warlike feats I have done, his spirits fly out
    Into my story: say 'Thus, mine enemy fell,
    And thus I set my foot on 's neck;' even then
    The princely blood flows in his cheek, he sweats,
    Strains his young nerves and puts himself in posture
    That acts my words. The younger brother, Cadwal,
    Once Arviragus, in as like a figure,
    Strikes life into my speech and shows much more
    His own conceiving.--Hark, the game is roused!
    O Cymbeline! heaven and my conscience knows
    Thou didst unjustly banish me: whereon,
    At three and two years old, I stole these babes;
    Thinking to bar thee of succession, as
    Thou reft'st me of my lands. Euriphile,
    Thou wast their nurse; they took thee for
    their mother,
    And every day do honour to her grave:
    Myself, Belarius, that am Morgan call'd,
    They take for natural father. The game is up.
  • Guiderius. Uncertain favour!

    Belarius. My fault being nothing--as I have told you oft--
    But that two villains, whose false oaths prevail'd
    Before my perfect honour, swore to Cymbeline
    I was confederate with the Romans: so
    Follow'd my banishment, and this twenty years
    This rock and these demesnes have been my world;
    Where I have lived at honest freedom, paid
    More pious debts to heaven than in all
    The fore-end of my time. But up to the mountains!
    This is not hunters' language: he that strikes
    The venison first shall be the lord o' the feast;
    To him the other two shall minister;
    And we will fear no poison, which attends
    In place of greater state. I'll meet you in the valleys.
    [Exeunt GUIDERIUS and ARVIRAGUS]
    How hard it is to hide the sparks of nature!
    These boys know little they are sons to the king;
    Nor Cymbeline dreams that they are alive.
    They think they are mine; and though train'd
    up thus meanly
    I' the cave wherein they bow, their thoughts do hit
    The roofs of palaces, and nature prompts them
    In simple and low things to prince it much
    Beyond the trick of others. This Polydore,
    The heir of Cymbeline and Britain, who
    The king his father call'd Guiderius,--Jove!
    When on my three-foot stool I sit and tell
    The warlike feats I have done, his spirits fly out
    Into my story: say 'Thus, mine enemy fell,
    And thus I set my foot on 's neck;' even then
    The princely blood flows in his cheek, he sweats,
    Strains his young nerves and puts himself in posture
    That acts my words. The younger brother, Cadwal,
    Once Arviragus, in as like a figure,
    Strikes life into my speech and shows much more
    His own conceiving.--Hark, the game is roused!
    O Cymbeline! heaven and my conscience knows
    Thou didst unjustly banish me: whereon,
    At three and two years old, I stole these babes;
    Thinking to bar thee of succession, as
    Thou reft'st me of my lands. Euriphile,
    Thou wast their nurse; they took thee for
    their mother,
    And every day do honour to her grave:
    Myself, Belarius, that am Morgan call'd,
    They take for natural father. The game is up.

5 III / 6
  • You, Polydote, have proved best woodman and
    Are master of the feast: Cadwal...
  • You, Polydote, have proved best woodman and
    Are master of the feast: Cadwal and I
    Will play the cook and servant; 'tis our match:
    The sweat of industry would dry and die,
    But for the end it works to. Come; our stomachs
    Will make what's homely savoury: weariness
    Can snore upon the flint, when resty sloth
    Finds the down pillow hard. Now peace be here,
    Poor house, that keep'st thyself!
  • Imogen. I see a man's life is a tedious one:
    I have tired myself, and for two nights together
    Have made the ground my bed. I should be sick,
    But that my resolution helps me. Milford,
    When from the mountain-top Pisanio show'd thee,
    Thou wast within a ken: O Jove! I think
    Foundations fly the wretched; such, I mean,
    Where they should be relieved. Two beggars told me
    I could not miss my way: will poor folks lie,
    That have afflictions on them, knowing 'tis
    A punishment or trial? Yes; no wonder,
    When rich ones scarce tell true. To lapse in fulness
    Is sorer than to lie for need, and falsehood
    Is worse in kings than beggars. My dear lord!
    Thou art one o' the false ones. Now I think on thee,
    My hunger's gone; but even before, I was
    At point to sink for food. But what is this?
    Here is a path to't: 'tis some savage hold:
    I were best not to call; I dare not call:
    yet famine,
    Ere clean it o'erthrow nature, makes it valiant,
    Plenty and peace breeds cowards: hardness ever
    Of hardiness is mother. Ho! who's here?
    If any thing that's civil, speak; if savage,
    Take or lend. Ho! No answer? Then I'll enter.
    Best draw my sword: and if mine enemy
    But fear the sword like me, he'll scarcely look on't.
    Such a foe, good heavens!

    Belarius. You, Polydote, have proved best woodman and
    Are master of the feast: Cadwal and I
    Will play the cook and servant; 'tis our match:
    The sweat of industry would dry and die,
    But for the end it works to. Come; our stomachs
    Will make what's homely savoury: weariness
    Can snore upon the flint, when resty sloth
    Finds the down pillow hard. Now peace be here,
    Poor house, that keep'st thyself!

6 III / 6
  • [Looking into the cave]
    Stay; come not in.
    But that it eats our victuals...
  • [Looking into the cave]
    Stay; come not in.
    But that it eats our victuals, I should think
    Here were a fairy.
  • Guiderius. There is cold meat i' the cave; we'll browse on that,
    Whilst what we have kill'd be cook'd.

    Belarius. [Looking into the cave]
    Stay; come not in.
    But that it eats our victuals, I should think
    Here were a fairy.

7 III / 6
  • By Jupiter, an angel! or, if not,
    An earthly paragon! Behold divineness
    ...
  • By Jupiter, an angel! or, if not,
    An earthly paragon! Behold divineness
    No elder than a boy!
  • Guiderius. What's the matter, sir?

    Belarius. By Jupiter, an angel! or, if not,
    An earthly paragon! Behold divineness
    No elder than a boy!

8 III / 6
  • Whither bound?
  • Whither bound?
  • Imogen. I see you're angry:
    Know, if you kill me for my fault, I should
    Have died had I not made it.

    Belarius. Whither bound?

9 III / 6
  • What's your name?
  • What's your name?
  • Imogen. To Milford-Haven.

    Belarius. What's your name?

10 III / 6
  • Prithee, fair youth,
    Think us no churls, nor measure our good minds
    By t...
  • Prithee, fair youth,
    Think us no churls, nor measure our good minds
    By this rude place we live in. Well encounter'd!
    'Tis almost night: you shall have better cheer
    Ere you depart: and thanks to stay and eat it.
    Boys, bid him welcome.
  • Imogen. Fidele, sir. I have a kinsman who
    Is bound for Italy; he embark'd at Milford;
    To whom being going, almost spent with hunger,
    I am fall'n in this offence.

    Belarius. Prithee, fair youth,
    Think us no churls, nor measure our good minds
    By this rude place we live in. Well encounter'd!
    'Tis almost night: you shall have better cheer
    Ere you depart: and thanks to stay and eat it.
    Boys, bid him welcome.

11 III / 6
  • He wrings at some distress.
  • He wrings at some distress.
  • Imogen. 'Mongst friends,
    If brothers.
    [Aside]
    Would it had been so, that they
    Had been my father's sons! then had my prize
    Been less, and so more equal ballasting
    To thee, Posthumus.

    Belarius. He wrings at some distress.

12 III / 6
  • Hark, boys.
  • Hark, boys.
  • Arviragus. Or I, whate'er it be,
    What pain it cost, what danger. God's!

    Belarius. Hark, boys.

13 III / 6
  • It shall be so.
    Boys, we'll go dress our hunt. Fair youth, come in:
    Disc...
  • It shall be so.
    Boys, we'll go dress our hunt. Fair youth, come in:
    Discourse is heavy, fasting; when we have supp'd,
    We'll mannerly demand thee of thy story,
    So far as thou wilt speak it.
  • Imogen. Great men,
    That had a court no bigger than this cave,
    That did attend themselves and had the virtue
    Which their own conscience seal'd them--laying by
    That nothing-gift of differing multitudes--
    Could not out-peer these twain. Pardon me, gods!
    I'd change my sex to be companion with them,
    Since Leonatus's false.

    Belarius. It shall be so.
    Boys, we'll go dress our hunt. Fair youth, come in:
    Discourse is heavy, fasting; when we have supp'd,
    We'll mannerly demand thee of thy story,
    So far as thou wilt speak it.

14 IV / 2
  • [To IMOGEN] You are not well: remain here in the cave;
    We'll come to you aft...
  • [To IMOGEN] You are not well: remain here in the cave;
    We'll come to you after hunting.
  • Cloten. I am near to the place where they should meet, if
    Pisanio have mapped it truly. How fit his garments
    serve me! Why should his mistress, who was made by
    him that made the tailor, not be fit too? the
    rather--saving reverence of the word--for 'tis said
    a woman's fitness comes by fits. Therein I must
    play the workman. I dare speak it to myself--for it
    is not vain-glory for a man and his glass to confer
    in his own chamber--I mean, the lines of my body are
    as well drawn as his; no less young, more strong,
    not beneath him in fortunes, beyond him in the
    advantage of the time, above him in birth, alike
    conversant in general services, and more remarkable
    in single oppositions: yet this imperceiverant
    thing loves him in my despite. What mortality is!
    Posthumus, thy head, which now is growing upon thy
    shoulders, shall within this hour be off; thy
    mistress enforced; thy garments cut to pieces before
    thy face: and all this done, spurn her home to her
    father; who may haply be a little angry for my so
    rough usage; but my mother, having power of his
    testiness, shall turn all into my commendations. My
    horse is tied up safe: out, sword, and to a sore
    purpose! Fortune, put them into my hand! This is
    the very description of their meeting-place; and
    the fellow dares not deceive me.

    Belarius. [To IMOGEN] You are not well: remain here in the cave;
    We'll come to you after hunting.

15 IV / 2
  • What! how! how!
  • What! how! how!
  • Guiderius. I love thee; I have spoke it
    How much the quantity, the weight as much,
    As I do love my father.

    Belarius. What! how! how!

16 IV / 2
  • [Aside]. O noble strain!
    O worthiness of nature! breed of greatness!
    Cow...
  • [Aside]. O noble strain!
    O worthiness of nature! breed of greatness!
    Cowards father cowards and base things sire base:
    Nature hath meal and bran, contempt and grace.
    I'm not their father; yet who this should be,
    Doth miracle itself, loved before me.
    'Tis the ninth hour o' the morn.
  • Arviragus. If it be sin to say so, I yoke me
    In my good brother's fault: I know not why
    I love this youth; and I have heard you say,
    Love's reason's without reason: the bier at door,
    And a demand who is't shall die, I'd say
    'My father, not this youth.'

    Belarius. [Aside]. O noble strain!
    O worthiness of nature! breed of greatness!
    Cowards father cowards and base things sire base:
    Nature hath meal and bran, contempt and grace.
    I'm not their father; yet who this should be,
    Doth miracle itself, loved before me.
    'Tis the ninth hour o' the morn.

17 IV / 2
  • To the field, to the field!
    We'll leave you for this time: go in and rest.
  • To the field, to the field!
    We'll leave you for this time: go in and rest.
  • Arviragus. Thus did he answer me: yet said, hereafter
    I might know more.

    Belarius. To the field, to the field!
    We'll leave you for this time: go in and rest.

18 IV / 2
  • Pray, be not sick,
    For you must be our housewife.
  • Pray, be not sick,
    For you must be our housewife.
  • Arviragus. We'll not be long away.

    Belarius. Pray, be not sick,
    For you must be our housewife.

19 IV / 2
  • And shalt be ever.
    [Exit IMOGEN, to the cave]
    This youth, how'er distres...
  • And shalt be ever.
    [Exit IMOGEN, to the cave]
    This youth, how'er distress'd, appears he hath had
    Good ancestors.
  • Imogen. Well or ill,
    I am bound to you.

    Belarius. And shalt be ever.
    [Exit IMOGEN, to the cave]
    This youth, how'er distress'd, appears he hath had
    Good ancestors.

20 IV / 2
  • It is great morning. Come, away!--
    Who's there?
  • It is great morning. Come, away!--
    Who's there?
  • Arviragus. Grow, patience!
    And let the stinking elder, grief, untwine
    His perishing root with the increasing vine!

    Belarius. It is great morning. Come, away!--
    Who's there?

21 IV / 2
  • 'Those runagates!'
    Means he not us? I partly know him: 'tis
    Cloten, the...
  • 'Those runagates!'
    Means he not us? I partly know him: 'tis
    Cloten, the son o' the queen. I fear some ambush.
    I saw him not these many years, and yet
    I know 'tis he. We are held as outlaws: hence!
  • Cloten. I cannot find those runagates; that villain
    Hath mock'd me. I am faint.

    Belarius. 'Those runagates!'
    Means he not us? I partly know him: 'tis
    Cloten, the son o' the queen. I fear some ambush.
    I saw him not these many years, and yet
    I know 'tis he. We are held as outlaws: hence!

22 IV / 2
  • No companies abroad?
  • No companies abroad?
  • Cloten. Die the death:
    When I have slain thee with my proper hand,
    I'll follow those that even now fled hence,
    And on the gates of Lud's-town set your heads:
    Yield, rustic mountaineer.

    Belarius. No companies abroad?

23 IV / 2
  • I cannot tell: long is it since I saw him,
    But time hath nothing blurr'd tho...
  • I cannot tell: long is it since I saw him,
    But time hath nothing blurr'd those lines of favour
    Which then he wore; the snatches in his voice,
    And burst of speaking, were as his: I am absolute
    'Twas very Cloten.
  • Arviragus. None in the world: you did mistake him, sure.

    Belarius. I cannot tell: long is it since I saw him,
    But time hath nothing blurr'd those lines of favour
    Which then he wore; the snatches in his voice,
    And burst of speaking, were as his: I am absolute
    'Twas very Cloten.

24 IV / 2
  • Being scarce made up,
    I mean, to man, he had not apprehension
    Of roaring...
  • Being scarce made up,
    I mean, to man, he had not apprehension
    Of roaring terrors; for the effect of judgment
    Is oft the cause of fear. But, see, thy brother.
  • Arviragus. In this place we left them:
    I wish my brother make good time with him,
    You say he is so fell.

    Belarius. Being scarce made up,
    I mean, to man, he had not apprehension
    Of roaring terrors; for the effect of judgment
    Is oft the cause of fear. But, see, thy brother.

25 IV / 2
  • What hast thou done?
  • What hast thou done?
  • Guiderius. This Cloten was a fool, an empty purse;
    There was no money in't: not Hercules
    Could have knock'd out his brains, for he had none:
    Yet I not doing this, the fool had borne
    My head as I do his.

    Belarius. What hast thou done?

26 IV / 2
  • We are all undone.
  • We are all undone.
  • Guiderius. I am perfect what: cut off one Cloten's head,
    Son to the queen, after his own report;
    Who call'd me traitor, mountaineer, and swore
    With his own single hand he'ld take us in
    Displace our heads where--thank the gods!--they grow,
    And set them on Lud's-town.

    Belarius. We are all undone.

27 IV / 2
  • No single soul
    Can we set eye on; but in all safe reason
    He must have so...
  • No single soul
    Can we set eye on; but in all safe reason
    He must have some attendants. Though his humour
    Was nothing but mutation, ay, and that
    From one bad thing to worse; not frenzy, not
    Absolute madness could so far have raved
    To bring him here alone; although perhaps
    It may be heard at court that such as we
    Cave here, hunt here, are outlaws, and in time
    May make some stronger head; the which he hearing--
    As it is like him--might break out, and swear
    He'ld fetch us in; yet is't not probable
    To come alone, either he so undertaking,
    Or they so suffering: then on good ground we fear,
    If we do fear this body hath a tail
    More perilous than the head.
  • Guiderius. Why, worthy father, what have we to lose,
    But that he swore to take, our lives? The law
    Protects not us: then why should we be tender
    To let an arrogant piece of flesh threat us,
    Play judge and executioner all himself,
    For we do fear the law? What company
    Discover you abroad?

    Belarius. No single soul
    Can we set eye on; but in all safe reason
    He must have some attendants. Though his humour
    Was nothing but mutation, ay, and that
    From one bad thing to worse; not frenzy, not
    Absolute madness could so far have raved
    To bring him here alone; although perhaps
    It may be heard at court that such as we
    Cave here, hunt here, are outlaws, and in time
    May make some stronger head; the which he hearing--
    As it is like him--might break out, and swear
    He'ld fetch us in; yet is't not probable
    To come alone, either he so undertaking,
    Or they so suffering: then on good ground we fear,
    If we do fear this body hath a tail
    More perilous than the head.

28 IV / 2
  • I had no mind
    To hunt this day: the boy Fidele's sickness
    Did make my wa...
  • I had no mind
    To hunt this day: the boy Fidele's sickness
    Did make my way long forth.
  • Arviragus. Let ordinance
    Come as the gods foresay it: howsoe'er,
    My brother hath done well.

    Belarius. I had no mind
    To hunt this day: the boy Fidele's sickness
    Did make my way long forth.

29 IV / 2
  • I fear 'twill be revenged:
    Would, Polydote, thou hadst not done't! though va...
  • I fear 'twill be revenged:
    Would, Polydote, thou hadst not done't! though valour
    Becomes thee well enough.
  • Guiderius. With his own sword,
    Which he did wave against my throat, I have ta'en
    His head from him: I'll throw't into the creek
    Behind our rock; and let it to the sea,
    And tell the fishes he's the queen's son, Cloten:
    That's all I reck.

    Belarius. I fear 'twill be revenged:
    Would, Polydote, thou hadst not done't! though valour
    Becomes thee well enough.

30 IV / 2
  • Well, 'tis done:
    We'll hunt no more to-day, nor seek for danger
    Where th...
  • Well, 'tis done:
    We'll hunt no more to-day, nor seek for danger
    Where there's no profit. I prithee, to our rock;
    You and Fidele play the cooks: I'll stay
    Till hasty Polydote return, and bring him
    To dinner presently.
  • Arviragus. Would I had done't
    So the revenge alone pursued me! Polydore,
    I love thee brotherly, but envy much
    Thou hast robb'd me of this deed: I would revenges,
    That possible strength might meet, would seek us through
    And put us to our answer.

    Belarius. Well, 'tis done:
    We'll hunt no more to-day, nor seek for danger
    Where there's no profit. I prithee, to our rock;
    You and Fidele play the cooks: I'll stay
    Till hasty Polydote return, and bring him
    To dinner presently.

31 IV / 2
  • O thou goddess,
    Thou divine Nature, how thyself thou blazon'st
    In these...
  • O thou goddess,
    Thou divine Nature, how thyself thou blazon'st
    In these two princely boys! They are as gentle
    As zephyrs blowing below the violet,
    Not wagging his sweet head; and yet as rough,
    Their royal blood enchafed, as the rudest wind,
    That by the top doth take the mountain pine,
    And make him stoop to the vale. 'Tis wonder
    That an invisible instinct should frame them
    To royalty unlearn'd, honour untaught,
    Civility not seen from other, valour
    That wildly grows in them, but yields a crop
    As if it had been sow'd. Yet still it's strange
    What Cloten's being here to us portends,
    Or what his death will bring us.
  • Arviragus. Poor sick Fidele!
    I'll weringly to him: to gain his colour
    I'ld let a parish of such Clotens' blood,
    And praise myself for charity.

    Belarius. O thou goddess,
    Thou divine Nature, how thyself thou blazon'st
    In these two princely boys! They are as gentle
    As zephyrs blowing below the violet,
    Not wagging his sweet head; and yet as rough,
    Their royal blood enchafed, as the rudest wind,
    That by the top doth take the mountain pine,
    And make him stoop to the vale. 'Tis wonder
    That an invisible instinct should frame them
    To royalty unlearn'd, honour untaught,
    Civility not seen from other, valour
    That wildly grows in them, but yields a crop
    As if it had been sow'd. Yet still it's strange
    What Cloten's being here to us portends,
    Or what his death will bring us.

32 IV / 2
  • My ingenious instrument!
    Hark, Polydore, it sounds! But what occasion
    Ha...
  • My ingenious instrument!
    Hark, Polydore, it sounds! But what occasion
    Hath Cadwal now to give it motion? Hark!
  • Guiderius. Where's my brother?
    I have sent Cloten's clotpoll down the stream,
    In embassy to his mother: his body's hostage
    For his return.

    Belarius. My ingenious instrument!
    Hark, Polydore, it sounds! But what occasion
    Hath Cadwal now to give it motion? Hark!

33 IV / 2
  • He went hence even now.
  • He went hence even now.
  • Guiderius. Is he at home?

    Belarius. He went hence even now.

34 IV / 2
  • Look, here he comes,
    And brings the dire occasion in his arms
    Of what we...
  • Look, here he comes,
    And brings the dire occasion in his arms
    Of what we blame him for.
    [Re-enter ARVIRAGUS, with IMOGEN, as dead,]
    bearing her in his arms]
  • Guiderius. What does he mean? since death of my dear'st mother
    it did not speak before. All solemn things
    Should answer solemn accidents. The matter?
    Triumphs for nothing and lamenting toys
    Is jollity for apes and grief for boys.
    Is Cadwal mad?

    Belarius. Look, here he comes,
    And brings the dire occasion in his arms
    Of what we blame him for.
    [Re-enter ARVIRAGUS, with IMOGEN, as dead,]
    bearing her in his arms]

35 IV / 2
  • O melancholy!
    Who ever yet could sound thy bottom? find
    The ooze, to sho...
  • O melancholy!
    Who ever yet could sound thy bottom? find
    The ooze, to show what coast thy sluggish crare
    Might easiliest harbour in? Thou blessed thing!
    Jove knows what man thou mightst have made; but I,
    Thou diedst, a most rare boy, of melancholy.
    How found you him?
  • Guiderius. O sweetest, fairest lily!
    My brother wears thee not the one half so well
    As when thou grew'st thyself.

    Belarius. O melancholy!
    Who ever yet could sound thy bottom? find
    The ooze, to show what coast thy sluggish crare
    Might easiliest harbour in? Thou blessed thing!
    Jove knows what man thou mightst have made; but I,
    Thou diedst, a most rare boy, of melancholy.
    How found you him?

36 IV / 2
  • Great griefs, I see, medicine the less; for Cloten
    Is quite forgot. He was a...
  • Great griefs, I see, medicine the less; for Cloten
    Is quite forgot. He was a queen's son, boys;
    And though he came our enemy, remember
    He was paid for that: though mean and
    mighty, rotting
    Together, have one dust, yet reverence,
    That angel of the world, doth make distinction
    Of place 'tween high and low. Our foe was princely
    And though you took his life, as being our foe,
    Yet bury him as a prince.
  • Arviragus. We'll speak it, then.

    Belarius. Great griefs, I see, medicine the less; for Cloten
    Is quite forgot. He was a queen's son, boys;
    And though he came our enemy, remember
    He was paid for that: though mean and
    mighty, rotting
    Together, have one dust, yet reverence,
    That angel of the world, doth make distinction
    Of place 'tween high and low. Our foe was princely
    And though you took his life, as being our foe,
    Yet bury him as a prince.

37 IV / 2
  • Here's a few flowers; but 'bout midnight, more:
    The herbs that have on them...
  • Here's a few flowers; but 'bout midnight, more:
    The herbs that have on them cold dew o' the night
    Are strewings fitt'st for graves. Upon their faces.
    You were as flowers, now wither'd: even so
    These herblets shall, which we upon you strew.
    Come on, away: apart upon our knees.
    The ground that gave them first has them again:
    Their pleasures here are past, so is their pain.
  • Guiderius. We have done our obsequies: come, lay him down.

    Belarius. Here's a few flowers; but 'bout midnight, more:
    The herbs that have on them cold dew o' the night
    Are strewings fitt'st for graves. Upon their faces.
    You were as flowers, now wither'd: even so
    These herblets shall, which we upon you strew.
    Come on, away: apart upon our knees.
    The ground that gave them first has them again:
    Their pleasures here are past, so is their pain.

38 IV / 4
  • Let us from it.
  • Let us from it.
  • Guiderius. The noise is round about us.

    Belarius. Let us from it.

39 IV / 4
  • Sons,
    We'll higher to the mountains; there secure us.
    To the king's part...
  • Sons,
    We'll higher to the mountains; there secure us.
    To the king's party there's no going: newness
    Of Cloten's death--we being not known, not muster'd
    Among the bands--may drive us to a render
    Where we have lived, and so extort from's that
    Which we have done, whose answer would be death
    Drawn on with torture.
  • Guiderius. Nay, what hope
    Have we in hiding us? This way, the Romans
    Must or for Britons slay us, or receive us
    For barbarous and unnatural revolts
    During their use, and slay us after.

    Belarius. Sons,
    We'll higher to the mountains; there secure us.
    To the king's party there's no going: newness
    Of Cloten's death--we being not known, not muster'd
    Among the bands--may drive us to a render
    Where we have lived, and so extort from's that
    Which we have done, whose answer would be death
    Drawn on with torture.

40 IV / 4
  • O, I am known
    Of many in the army: many years,
    Though Cloten then but yo...
  • O, I am known
    Of many in the army: many years,
    Though Cloten then but young, you see, not wore him
    From my remembrance. And, besides, the king
    Hath not deserved my service nor your loves;
    Who find in my exile the want of breeding,
    The certainty of this hard life; aye hopeless
    To have the courtesy your cradle promised,
    But to be still hot summer's tamings and
    The shrinking slaves of winter.
  • Arviragus. It is not likely
    That when they hear the Roman horses neigh,
    Behold their quarter'd fires, have both their eyes
    And ears so cloy'd importantly as now,
    That they will waste their time upon our note,
    To know from whence we are.

    Belarius. O, I am known
    Of many in the army: many years,
    Though Cloten then but young, you see, not wore him
    From my remembrance. And, besides, the king
    Hath not deserved my service nor your loves;
    Who find in my exile the want of breeding,
    The certainty of this hard life; aye hopeless
    To have the courtesy your cradle promised,
    But to be still hot summer's tamings and
    The shrinking slaves of winter.

41 IV / 4
  • No reason I, since of your lives you set
    So slight a valuation, should reser...
  • No reason I, since of your lives you set
    So slight a valuation, should reserve
    My crack'd one to more care. Have with you, boys!
    If in your country wars you chance to die,
    That is my bed too, lads, an there I'll lie:
    Lead, lead.
    [Aside]
    The time seems long; their blood
    thinks scorn,
    Till it fly out and show them princes born.
  • Arviragus. So say I. amen.

    Belarius. No reason I, since of your lives you set
    So slight a valuation, should reserve
    My crack'd one to more care. Have with you, boys!
    If in your country wars you chance to die,
    That is my bed too, lads, an there I'll lie:
    Lead, lead.
    [Aside]
    The time seems long; their blood
    thinks scorn,
    Till it fly out and show them princes born.

42 V / 2
  • Stand, stand! We have the advantage of the ground;
    The lane is guarded: noth...
  • Stand, stand! We have the advantage of the ground;
    The lane is guarded: nothing routs us but
    The villany of our fears.
  • Iachimo. The heaviness and guilt within my bosom
    Takes off my manhood: I have belied a lady,
    The princess of this country, and the air on't
    Revengingly enfeebles me; or could this carl,
    A very drudge of nature's, have subdued me
    In my profession? Knighthoods and honours, borne
    As I wear mine, are titles but of scorn.
    If that thy gentry, Britain, go before
    This lout as he exceeds our lords, the odds
    Is that we scarce are men and you are gods.
    [Exit]
    [The battle continues; the Britons fly; CYMBELINE is]
    taken: then enter, to his rescue, BELARIUS,
    GUIDERIUS, and ARVIRAGUS]

    Belarius. Stand, stand! We have the advantage of the ground;
    The lane is guarded: nothing routs us but
    The villany of our fears.

43 V / 5
  • I never saw
    Such noble fury in so poor a thing;
    Such precious deeds in o...
  • I never saw
    Such noble fury in so poor a thing;
    Such precious deeds in one that promises nought
    But beggary and poor looks.
  • Cymbeline. Stand by my side, you whom the gods have made
    Preservers of my throne. Woe is my heart
    That the poor soldier that so richly fought,
    Whose rags shamed gilded arms, whose naked breast
    Stepp'd before larges of proof, cannot be found:
    He shall be happy that can find him, if
    Our grace can make him so.

    Belarius. I never saw
    Such noble fury in so poor a thing;
    Such precious deeds in one that promises nought
    But beggary and poor looks.

44 V / 5
  • Sir,
    In Cambria are we born, and gentlemen:
    Further to boast were neithe...
  • Sir,
    In Cambria are we born, and gentlemen:
    Further to boast were neither true nor modest,
    Unless I add, we are honest.
  • Cymbeline. To my grief, I am
    The heir of his reward;
    [To BELARIUS, GUIDERIUS, and ARVIRAGUS]
    which I will add
    To you, the liver, heart and brain of Britain,
    By whom I grant she lives. 'Tis now the time
    To ask of whence you are. Report it.

    Belarius. Sir,
    In Cambria are we born, and gentlemen:
    Further to boast were neither true nor modest,
    Unless I add, we are honest.

45 V / 5
  • Is not this boy revived from death?
  • Is not this boy revived from death?
  • Cymbeline. Thou'rt my good youth, my page;
    I'll be thy master: walk with me; speak freely.

    Belarius. Is not this boy revived from death?

46 V / 5
  • Peace, peace! see further; he eyes us not; forbear;
    Creatures may be alike:...
  • Peace, peace! see further; he eyes us not; forbear;
    Creatures may be alike: were 't he, I am sure
    He would have spoke to us.
  • Guiderius. The same dead thing alive.

    Belarius. Peace, peace! see further; he eyes us not; forbear;
    Creatures may be alike: were 't he, I am sure
    He would have spoke to us.

47 V / 5
  • Be silent; let's see further.
  • Be silent; let's see further.
  • Guiderius. But we saw him dead.

    Belarius. Be silent; let's see further.

48 V / 5
  • My boys,
    There was our error.
  • My boys,
    There was our error.
  • Imogen. Most like I did, for I was dead.

    Belarius. My boys,
    There was our error.

49 V / 5
  • [To GUIDERIUS and ARVIRAGUS] Though you did love
    this youth, I blame ye not:...
  • [To GUIDERIUS and ARVIRAGUS] Though you did love
    this youth, I blame ye not:
    You had a motive for't.
  • Imogen. [Kneeling] Your blessing, sir.

    Belarius. [To GUIDERIUS and ARVIRAGUS] Though you did love
    this youth, I blame ye not:
    You had a motive for't.

50 V / 5
  • Stay, sir king:
    This man is better than the man he slew,
    As well descend...
  • Stay, sir king:
    This man is better than the man he slew,
    As well descended as thyself; and hath
    More of thee merited than a band of Clotens
    Had ever scar for.
    [To the Guard]
    Let his arms alone;
    They were not born for bondage.
  • Cymbeline. Bind the offender,
    And take him from our presence.

    Belarius. Stay, sir king:
    This man is better than the man he slew,
    As well descended as thyself; and hath
    More of thee merited than a band of Clotens
    Had ever scar for.
    [To the Guard]
    Let his arms alone;
    They were not born for bondage.

51 V / 5
  • We will die all three:
    But I will prove that two on's are as good
    As I h...
  • We will die all three:
    But I will prove that two on's are as good
    As I have given out him. My sons, I must,
    For mine own part, unfold a dangerous speech,
    Though, haply, well for you.
  • Cymbeline. And thou shalt die for't.

    Belarius. We will die all three:
    But I will prove that two on's are as good
    As I have given out him. My sons, I must,
    For mine own part, unfold a dangerous speech,
    Though, haply, well for you.

52 V / 5
  • Have at it then, by leave.
    Thou hadst, great king, a subject who
    Was cal...
  • Have at it then, by leave.
    Thou hadst, great king, a subject who
    Was call'd Belarius.
  • Guiderius. And our good his.

    Belarius. Have at it then, by leave.
    Thou hadst, great king, a subject who
    Was call'd Belarius.

53 V / 5
  • He it is that hath
    Assumed this age; indeed a banish'd man;
    I know not h...
  • He it is that hath
    Assumed this age; indeed a banish'd man;
    I know not how a traitor.
  • Cymbeline. What of him? he is
    A banish'd traitor.

    Belarius. He it is that hath
    Assumed this age; indeed a banish'd man;
    I know not how a traitor.

54 V / 5
  • Not too hot:
    First pay me for the nursing of thy sons;
    And let it be con...
  • Not too hot:
    First pay me for the nursing of thy sons;
    And let it be confiscate all, so soon
    As I have received it.
  • Cymbeline. Take him hence:
    The whole world shall not save him.

    Belarius. Not too hot:
    First pay me for the nursing of thy sons;
    And let it be confiscate all, so soon
    As I have received it.

55 V / 5
  • I am too blunt and saucy: here's my knee:
    Ere I arise, I will prefer my sons...
  • I am too blunt and saucy: here's my knee:
    Ere I arise, I will prefer my sons;
    Then spare not the old father. Mighty sir,
    These two young gentlemen, that call me father
    And think they are my sons, are none of mine;
    They are the issue of your loins, my liege,
    And blood of your begetting.
  • Cymbeline. Nursing of my sons!

    Belarius. I am too blunt and saucy: here's my knee:
    Ere I arise, I will prefer my sons;
    Then spare not the old father. Mighty sir,
    These two young gentlemen, that call me father
    And think they are my sons, are none of mine;
    They are the issue of your loins, my liege,
    And blood of your begetting.

56 V / 5
  • So sure as you your father's. I, old Morgan,
    Am that Belarius whom you somet...
  • So sure as you your father's. I, old Morgan,
    Am that Belarius whom you sometime banish'd:
    Your pleasure was my mere offence, my punishment
    Itself, and all my treason; that I suffer'd
    Was all the harm I did. These gentle princes--
    For such and so they are--these twenty years
    Have I train'd up: those arts they have as I
    Could put into them; my breeding was, sir, as
    Your highness knows. Their nurse, Euriphile,
    Whom for the theft I wedded, stole these children
    Upon my banishment: I moved her to't,
    Having received the punishment before,
    For that which I did then: beaten for loyalty
    Excited me to treason: their dear loss,
    The more of you 'twas felt, the more it shaped
    Unto my end of stealing them. But, gracious sir,
    Here are your sons again; and I must lose
    Two of the sweet'st companions in the world.
    The benediction of these covering heavens
    Fall on their heads like dew! for they are worthy
    To inlay heaven with stars.
  • Cymbeline. How! my issue!

    Belarius. So sure as you your father's. I, old Morgan,
    Am that Belarius whom you sometime banish'd:
    Your pleasure was my mere offence, my punishment
    Itself, and all my treason; that I suffer'd
    Was all the harm I did. These gentle princes--
    For such and so they are--these twenty years
    Have I train'd up: those arts they have as I
    Could put into them; my breeding was, sir, as
    Your highness knows. Their nurse, Euriphile,
    Whom for the theft I wedded, stole these children
    Upon my banishment: I moved her to't,
    Having received the punishment before,
    For that which I did then: beaten for loyalty
    Excited me to treason: their dear loss,
    The more of you 'twas felt, the more it shaped
    Unto my end of stealing them. But, gracious sir,
    Here are your sons again; and I must lose
    Two of the sweet'st companions in the world.
    The benediction of these covering heavens
    Fall on their heads like dew! for they are worthy
    To inlay heaven with stars.

57 V / 5
  • Be pleased awhile.
    This gentleman, whom I call Polydore,
    Most worthy pri...
  • Be pleased awhile.
    This gentleman, whom I call Polydore,
    Most worthy prince, as yours, is true Guiderius:
    This gentleman, my Cadwal, Arviragus,
    Your younger princely son; he, sir, was lapp'd
    In a most curious mantle, wrought by the hand
    Of his queen mother, which for more probation
    I can with ease produce.
  • Cymbeline. Thou weep'st, and speak'st.
    The service that you three have done is more
    Unlike than this thou tell'st. I lost my children:
    If these be they, I know not how to wish
    A pair of worthier sons.

    Belarius. Be pleased awhile.
    This gentleman, whom I call Polydore,
    Most worthy prince, as yours, is true Guiderius:
    This gentleman, my Cadwal, Arviragus,
    Your younger princely son; he, sir, was lapp'd
    In a most curious mantle, wrought by the hand
    Of his queen mother, which for more probation
    I can with ease produce.

58 V / 5
  • This is he;
    Who hath upon him still that natural stamp:
    It was wise natu...
  • This is he;
    Who hath upon him still that natural stamp:
    It was wise nature's end in the donation,
    To be his evidence now.
  • Cymbeline. Guiderius had
    Upon his neck a mole, a sanguine star;
    It was a mark of wonder.

    Belarius. This is he;
    Who hath upon him still that natural stamp:
    It was wise nature's end in the donation,
    To be his evidence now.

© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.