Speeches (Lines) for Biondello in "The Taming of the Shrew"

Total: 39
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 1
  • Where have I been! Nay, how now! where are you?
    Master, has my fellow Tranio...
  • Where have I been! Nay, how now! where are you?
    Master, has my fellow Tranio stol'n your clothes?
    Or you stol'n his? or both? Pray, what's the news?
  • Lucentio. Tranio, be so because Lucentio loves;
    And let me be a slave t' achieve that maid
    Whose sudden sight hath thrall'd my wounded eye.
    [Enter BIONDELLO.]
    Here comes the rogue. Sirrah, where have you been?

    Biondello. Where have I been! Nay, how now! where are you?
    Master, has my fellow Tranio stol'n your clothes?
    Or you stol'n his? or both? Pray, what's the news?

2 I / 1
  • I, sir? Ne'er a whit.
  • I, sir? Ne'er a whit.
  • Lucentio. Sirrah, come hither; 'tis no time to jest,
    And therefore frame your manners to the time.
    Your fellow Tranio here, to save my life,
    Puts my apparel and my count'nance on,
    And I for my escape have put on his;
    For in a quarrel since I came ashore
    I kill'd a man, and fear I was descried.
    Wait you on him, I charge you, as becomes,
    While I make way from hence to save my life.
    You understand me?

    Biondello. I, sir? Ne'er a whit.

3 I / 1
  • The better for him; would I were so too!
  • The better for him; would I were so too!
  • Lucentio. And not a jot of Tranio in your mouth:
    Tranio is chang'd into Lucentio.

    Biondello. The better for him; would I were so too!

4 I / 2
  • He that has the two fair daughters; is't he you mean?
  • He that has the two fair daughters; is't he you mean?
  • Tranio. Gentlemen, God save you! If I may be bold,
    Tell me, I beseech you, which is the readiest way
    To the house of Signior Baptista Minola?

    Biondello. He that has the two fair daughters; is't he you mean?

5 III / 2
  • Why, is it not news to hear of Petruchio's coming?
  • Why, is it not news to hear of Petruchio's coming?
  • Baptista Minola. Is it new and old too? How may that be?

    Biondello. Why, is it not news to hear of Petruchio's coming?

6 III / 2
  • Why, no, sir.
  • Why, no, sir.
  • Baptista Minola. Is he come?

    Biondello. Why, no, sir.

7 III / 2
  • He is coming.
  • He is coming.
  • Baptista Minola. What then?

    Biondello. He is coming.

8 III / 2
  • When he stands where I am and sees you there.
  • When he stands where I am and sees you there.
  • Baptista Minola. When will he be here?

    Biondello. When he stands where I am and sees you there.

9 III / 2
  • Why, Petruchio is coming- in a new hat and an old
    jerkin; a pair of old bree...
  • Why, Petruchio is coming- in a new hat and an old
    jerkin; a pair of old breeches thrice turn'd; a pair of boots
    that have been candle-cases, one buckled, another lac'd; an old
    rusty sword ta'en out of the town armoury, with a broken hilt,
    and chapeless; with two broken points; his horse hipp'd, with an
    old motley saddle and stirrups of no kindred; besides, possess'd
    with the glanders and like to mose in the chine, troubled with
    the lampass, infected with the fashions, full of windgalls, sped
    with spavins, rayed with the yellows, past cure of the fives,
    stark spoil'd with the staggers, begnawn with the bots, sway'd in
    the back and shoulder-shotten, near-legg'd before, and with a
    half-cheek'd bit, and a head-stall of sheep's leather which,
    being restrained to keep him from stumbling, hath been often
    burst, and now repaired with knots; one girth six times piec'd,
    and a woman's crupper of velure, which hath two letters for her
    name fairly set down in studs, and here and there piec'd with
    pack-thread.
  • Tranio. But, say, what to thine old news?

    Biondello. Why, Petruchio is coming- in a new hat and an old
    jerkin; a pair of old breeches thrice turn'd; a pair of boots
    that have been candle-cases, one buckled, another lac'd; an old
    rusty sword ta'en out of the town armoury, with a broken hilt,
    and chapeless; with two broken points; his horse hipp'd, with an
    old motley saddle and stirrups of no kindred; besides, possess'd
    with the glanders and like to mose in the chine, troubled with
    the lampass, infected with the fashions, full of windgalls, sped
    with spavins, rayed with the yellows, past cure of the fives,
    stark spoil'd with the staggers, begnawn with the bots, sway'd in
    the back and shoulder-shotten, near-legg'd before, and with a
    half-cheek'd bit, and a head-stall of sheep's leather which,
    being restrained to keep him from stumbling, hath been often
    burst, and now repaired with knots; one girth six times piec'd,
    and a woman's crupper of velure, which hath two letters for her
    name fairly set down in studs, and here and there piec'd with
    pack-thread.

10 III / 2
  • O, sir, his lackey, for all the world caparison'd like
    the horse- with a lin...
  • O, sir, his lackey, for all the world caparison'd like
    the horse- with a linen stock on one leg and a kersey boot-hose
    on the other, gart'red with a red and blue list; an old hat, and
    the humour of forty fancies prick'd in't for a feather; a
    monster, a very monster in apparel, and not like a Christian
    footboy or a gentleman's lackey.
  • Baptista Minola. Who comes with him?

    Biondello. O, sir, his lackey, for all the world caparison'd like
    the horse- with a linen stock on one leg and a kersey boot-hose
    on the other, gart'red with a red and blue list; an old hat, and
    the humour of forty fancies prick'd in't for a feather; a
    monster, a very monster in apparel, and not like a Christian
    footboy or a gentleman's lackey.

11 III / 2
  • Why, sir, he comes not.
  • Why, sir, he comes not.
  • Baptista Minola. I am glad he's come, howsoe'er he comes.

    Biondello. Why, sir, he comes not.

12 III / 2
  • Who? that Petruchio came?
  • Who? that Petruchio came?
  • Baptista Minola. Didst thou not say he comes?

    Biondello. Who? that Petruchio came?

13 III / 2
  • No, sir; I say his horse comes with him on his back.
  • No, sir; I say his horse comes with him on his back.
  • Baptista Minola. Ay, that Petruchio came.

    Biondello. No, sir; I say his horse comes with him on his back.

14 III / 2
  • Nay, by Saint Jamy,
    I hold you a penny,
    A horse and a...
  • Nay, by Saint Jamy,
    I hold you a penny,
    A horse and a man
    Is more than one,
    And yet not many.
  • Baptista Minola. Why, that's all one.

    Biondello. Nay, by Saint Jamy,
    I hold you a penny,
    A horse and a man
    Is more than one,
    And yet not many.

15 IV / 2
  • O master, master I have watch'd so long
    That I am dog-weary; but at last I s...
  • O master, master I have watch'd so long
    That I am dog-weary; but at last I spied
    An ancient angel coming down the hill
    Will serve the turn.
  • Tranio. Ay, mistress; and Petruchio is the master,
    That teacheth tricks eleven and twenty long,
    To tame a shrew and charm her chattering tongue.

    Biondello. O master, master I have watch'd so long
    That I am dog-weary; but at last I spied
    An ancient angel coming down the hill
    Will serve the turn.

16 IV / 2
  • Master, a mercatante or a pedant,
    I know not what; but formal in apparel,
  • Master, a mercatante or a pedant,
    I know not what; but formal in apparel,
    In gait and countenance surely like a father.
  • Tranio. What is he, Biondello?

    Biondello. Master, a mercatante or a pedant,
    I know not what; but formal in apparel,
    In gait and countenance surely like a father.

17 IV / 2
  • [Aside] As much as an apple doth an oyster, and all
    one.
  • [Aside] As much as an apple doth an oyster, and all
    one.
  • Tranio. He is my father, sir; and, sooth to say,
    In count'nance somewhat doth resemble you.

    Biondello. [Aside] As much as an apple doth an oyster, and all
    one.

18 IV / 4
  • Tut, fear not me.
  • Tut, fear not me.
  • Tranio. Fear you not him. Sirrah Biondello,
    Now do your duty throughly, I advise you.
    Imagine 'twere the right Vincentio.

    Biondello. Tut, fear not me.

19 IV / 4
  • I told him that your father was at Venice,
    And that you look'd for him this...
  • I told him that your father was at Venice,
    And that you look'd for him this day in Padua.
  • Tranio. But hast thou done thy errand to Baptista?

    Biondello. I told him that your father was at Venice,
    And that you look'd for him this day in Padua.

20 IV / 4
  • I pray the gods she may, with all my heart.
  • I pray the gods she may, with all my heart.
  • Baptista Minola. It likes me well. Cambio, hie you home,
    And bid Bianca make her ready straight;
    And, if you will, tell what hath happened-
    Lucentio's father is arriv'd in Padua,
    And how she's like to be Lucentio's wife. Exit LUCENTIO

    Biondello. I pray the gods she may, with all my heart.

21 IV / 4
  • Cambio.
  • Cambio.
  • Baptista Minola. I follow you. Exeunt

    Biondello. Cambio.

22 IV / 4
  • You saw my master wink and laugh upon you?
  • You saw my master wink and laugh upon you?
  • Lucentio. What say'st thou, Biondello?

    Biondello. You saw my master wink and laugh upon you?

23 IV / 4
  • Faith, nothing; but has left me here behind to expound
    the meaning or moral...
  • Faith, nothing; but has left me here behind to expound
    the meaning or moral of his signs and tokens.
  • Lucentio. Biondello, what of that?

    Biondello. Faith, nothing; but has left me here behind to expound
    the meaning or moral of his signs and tokens.

24 IV / 4
  • Then thus: Baptista is safe, talking with the deceiving
    father of a deceitfu...
  • Then thus: Baptista is safe, talking with the deceiving
    father of a deceitful son.
  • Lucentio. I pray thee moralize them.

    Biondello. Then thus: Baptista is safe, talking with the deceiving
    father of a deceitful son.

25 IV / 4
  • His daughter is to be brought by you to the supper.
  • His daughter is to be brought by you to the supper.
  • Lucentio. And what of him?

    Biondello. His daughter is to be brought by you to the supper.

26 IV / 4
  • The old priest at Saint Luke's church is at your command
    at all hours.
  • The old priest at Saint Luke's church is at your command
    at all hours.
  • Lucentio. And then?

    Biondello. The old priest at Saint Luke's church is at your command
    at all hours.

27 IV / 4
  • I cannot tell, except they are busied about a
    counterfeit assurance. Take yo...
  • I cannot tell, except they are busied about a
    counterfeit assurance. Take your assurance of her, cum privilegio
    ad imprimendum solum; to th' church take the priest, clerk, and
    some sufficient honest witnesses.
    If this be not that you look for, I have more to say,
    But bid Bianca farewell for ever and a day.
  • Lucentio. And what of all this?

    Biondello. I cannot tell, except they are busied about a
    counterfeit assurance. Take your assurance of her, cum privilegio
    ad imprimendum solum; to th' church take the priest, clerk, and
    some sufficient honest witnesses.
    If this be not that you look for, I have more to say,
    But bid Bianca farewell for ever and a day.

28 IV / 4
  • I cannot tarry. I knew a wench married in an afternoon
    as she went to the ga...
  • I cannot tarry. I knew a wench married in an afternoon
    as she went to the garden for parsley to stuff a rabbit; and so
    may you, sir; and so adieu, sir. My master hath appointed me to
    go to Saint Luke's to bid the priest be ready to come against you
    come with your appendix.
  • Lucentio. Hear'st thou, Biondello?

    Biondello. I cannot tarry. I knew a wench married in an afternoon
    as she went to the garden for parsley to stuff a rabbit; and so
    may you, sir; and so adieu, sir. My master hath appointed me to
    go to Saint Luke's to bid the priest be ready to come against you
    come with your appendix.

29 V / 1
  • Softly and swiftly, sir, for the priest is ready.
  • Softly and swiftly, sir, for the priest is ready.
  • Hortensio. Well, Petruchio, this has put me in heart.
    Have to my widow; and if she be froward,
    Then hast thou taught Hortensio to be untoward. Exit

    Biondello. Softly and swiftly, sir, for the priest is ready.

30 V / 1
  • Nay, faith, I'll see the church a your back, and then
    come back to my master...
  • Nay, faith, I'll see the church a your back, and then
    come back to my master's as soon as I can.
  • Lucentio. I fly, Biondello; but they may chance to need the at
    home, therefore leave us.

    Biondello. Nay, faith, I'll see the church a your back, and then
    come back to my master's as soon as I can.

31 V / 1
  • I have seen them in the church together. God send 'em
    good shipping! But who...
  • I have seen them in the church together. God send 'em
    good shipping! But who is here? Mine old master, Vincentio! Now we
    are undone and brought to nothing.
  • Pedant. Lay hands on the villain; I believe 'a means to cozen
    somebody in this city under my countenance.

    Biondello. I have seen them in the church together. God send 'em
    good shipping! But who is here? Mine old master, Vincentio! Now we
    are undone and brought to nothing.

32 V / 1
  • I hope I may choose, sir.
  • I hope I may choose, sir.
  • Vincentio. [Seeing BIONDELLO] Come hither, crack-hemp.

    Biondello. I hope I may choose, sir.

33 V / 1
  • Forgot you! No, sir. I could not forget you, for I never
    saw you before in a...
  • Forgot you! No, sir. I could not forget you, for I never
    saw you before in all my life.
  • Vincentio. Come hither, you rogue. What, have you forgot me?

    Biondello. Forgot you! No, sir. I could not forget you, for I never
    saw you before in all my life.

34 V / 1
  • What, my old worshipful old master? Yes, marry, sir; see
    where he looks out...
  • What, my old worshipful old master? Yes, marry, sir; see
    where he looks out of the window.
  • Vincentio. What, you notorious villain, didst thou never see thy
    master's father, Vincentio?

    Biondello. What, my old worshipful old master? Yes, marry, sir; see
    where he looks out of the window.

35 V / 1
  • Help, help, help! Here's a madman will murder me.
  • Help, help, help! Here's a madman will murder me.
  • Vincentio. Is't so, indeed? [He beats BIONDELLO]

    Biondello. Help, help, help! Here's a madman will murder me.

36 V / 1
  • O, we are spoil'd; and yonder he is! Deny him, forswear
    him, or else we are...
  • O, we are spoil'd; and yonder he is! Deny him, forswear
    him, or else we are all undone.
  • Vincentio. Thus strangers may be hal'd and abus'd. O monstrous
    villain!

    Biondello. O, we are spoil'd; and yonder he is! Deny him, forswear
    him, or else we are all undone.

37 V / 2
  • I go. Exit
  • I go. Exit
  • Lucentio. That will I.
    Go, Biondello, bid your mistress come to me.

    Biondello. I go. Exit

38 V / 2
  • Sir, my mistress sends you word
    That she is busy and she cannot come.
  • Sir, my mistress sends you word
    That she is busy and she cannot come.
  • Lucentio. I'll have no halves; I'll bear it all myself.
    [Re-enter BIONDELLO]
    How now! what news?

    Biondello. Sir, my mistress sends you word
    That she is busy and she cannot come.

39 V / 2
  • She says you have some goodly jest in hand:
    She will not come; she bids you...
  • She says you have some goodly jest in hand:
    She will not come; she bids you come to her.
  • Hortensio. I am afraid, sir,
    Do what you can, yours will not be entreated.
    [Re-enter BIONDELLO]
    Now, where's my wife?

    Biondello. She says you have some goodly jest in hand:
    She will not come; she bids you come to her.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.