Speeches (Lines) for Boyet in "Love's Labour's Lost"

Total: 80
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# Act, Scene, Line Speech text
1 II, 1, 485
  • Now, madam, summon up your dearest spirits:
    Consider who the king your fathe...
  • Now, madam, summon up your dearest spirits:
    Consider who the king your father sends,
    To whom he sends, and what's his embassy:
    Yourself, held precious in the world's esteem,
    To parley with the sole inheritor
    Of all perfections that a man may owe,
    Matchless Navarre; the plea of no less weight
    Than Aquitaine, a dowry for a queen.
    Be now as prodigal of all dear grace
    As Nature was in making graces dear
    When she did starve the general world beside
    And prodigally gave them all to you.
  • (stage directions). [Enter the PRINCESS of France, ROSALINE, MARIA,]
    KATHARINE, BOYET, Lords, and other Attendants]

    Boyet. Now, madam, summon up your dearest spirits:
    Consider who the king your father sends,
    To whom he sends, and what's his embassy:
    Yourself, held precious in the world's esteem,
    To parley with the sole inheritor
    Of all perfections that a man may owe,
    Matchless Navarre; the plea of no less weight
    Than Aquitaine, a dowry for a queen.
    Be now as prodigal of all dear grace
    As Nature was in making graces dear
    When she did starve the general world beside
    And prodigally gave them all to you.

2 II, 1, 519
  • Proud of employment, willingly I go.
  • Proud of employment, willingly I go.
  • Princess of France. Good Lord Boyet, my beauty, though but mean,
    Needs not the painted flourish of your praise:
    Beauty is bought by judgement of the eye,
    Not utter'd by base sale of chapmen's tongues:
    I am less proud to hear you tell my worth
    Than you much willing to be counted wise
    In spending your wit in the praise of mine.
    But now to task the tasker: good Boyet,
    You are not ignorant, all-telling fame
    Doth noise abroad, Navarre hath made a vow,
    Till painful study shall outwear three years,
    No woman may approach his silent court:
    Therefore to's seemeth it a needful course,
    Before we enter his forbidden gates,
    To know his pleasure; and in that behalf,
    Bold of your worthiness, we single you
    As our best-moving fair solicitor.
    Tell him, the daughter of the King of France,
    On serious business, craving quick dispatch,
    Importunes personal conference with his grace:
    Haste, signify so much; while we attend,
    Like humble-visaged suitors, his high will.

    Boyet. Proud of employment, willingly I go.

3 II, 1, 569
  • Navarre had notice of your fair approach;
    And he and his competitors in oath...
  • Navarre had notice of your fair approach;
    And he and his competitors in oath
    Were all address'd to meet you, gentle lady,
    Before I came. Marry, thus much I have learnt:
    He rather means to lodge you in the field,
    Like one that comes here to besiege his court,
    Than seek a dispensation for his oath,
    To let you enter his unpeopled house.
    Here comes Navarre.
    [Enter FERDINAND, LONGAVILLE, DUMAIN, BIRON, and]
    Attendants]
  • Princess of France. Now, what admittance, lord?

    Boyet. Navarre had notice of your fair approach;
    And he and his competitors in oath
    Were all address'd to meet you, gentle lady,
    Before I came. Marry, thus much I have learnt:
    He rather means to lodge you in the field,
    Like one that comes here to besiege his court,
    Than seek a dispensation for his oath,
    To let you enter his unpeopled house.
    Here comes Navarre.
    [Enter FERDINAND, LONGAVILLE, DUMAIN, BIRON, and]
    Attendants]

4 II, 1, 655
  • So please your grace, the packet is not come
    Where that and other specialtie...
  • So please your grace, the packet is not come
    Where that and other specialties are bound:
    To-morrow you shall have a sight of them.
  • Ferdinand. Satisfy me so.

    Boyet. So please your grace, the packet is not come
    Where that and other specialties are bound:
    To-morrow you shall have a sight of them.

5 II, 1, 687
  • The heir of Alencon, Katharine her name.
  • The heir of Alencon, Katharine her name.
  • Dumain. Sir, I pray you, a word: what lady is that same?

    Boyet. The heir of Alencon, Katharine her name.

6 II, 1, 691
  • A woman sometimes, an you saw her in the light.
  • A woman sometimes, an you saw her in the light.
  • Longaville. I beseech you a word: what is she in the white?

    Boyet. A woman sometimes, an you saw her in the light.

7 II, 1, 693
  • She hath but one for herself; to desire that were a shame.
  • She hath but one for herself; to desire that were a shame.
  • Longaville. Perchance light in the light. I desire her name.

    Boyet. She hath but one for herself; to desire that were a shame.

8 II, 1, 695
  • Her mother's, I have heard.
  • Her mother's, I have heard.
  • Longaville. Pray you, sir, whose daughter?

    Boyet. Her mother's, I have heard.

9 II, 1, 697
  • Good sir, be not offended.
    She is an heir of Falconbridge.
  • Good sir, be not offended.
    She is an heir of Falconbridge.
  • Longaville. God's blessing on your beard!

    Boyet. Good sir, be not offended.
    She is an heir of Falconbridge.

10 II, 1, 701
  • Not unlike, sir, that may be.
  • Not unlike, sir, that may be.
  • Longaville. Nay, my choler is ended.
    She is a most sweet lady.

    Boyet. Not unlike, sir, that may be.

11 II, 1, 704
  • Rosaline, by good hap.
  • Rosaline, by good hap.
  • Biron. What's her name in the cap?

    Boyet. Rosaline, by good hap.

12 II, 1, 706
  • To her will, sir, or so.
  • To her will, sir, or so.
  • Biron. Is she wedded or no?

    Boyet. To her will, sir, or so.

13 II, 1, 708
  • Farewell to me, sir, and welcome to you.
  • Farewell to me, sir, and welcome to you.
  • Biron. You are welcome, sir: adieu.

    Boyet. Farewell to me, sir, and welcome to you.

14 II, 1, 712
  • And every jest but a word.
  • And every jest but a word.
  • Maria. That last is Biron, the merry madcap lord:
    Not a word with him but a jest.

    Boyet. And every jest but a word.

15 II, 1, 714
  • I was as willing to grapple as he was to board.
  • I was as willing to grapple as he was to board.
  • Princess of France. It was well done of you to take him at his word.

    Boyet. I was as willing to grapple as he was to board.

16 II, 1, 716
  • And wherefore not ships?
    No sheep, sweet lamb, unless we feed on your lips.
  • And wherefore not ships?
    No sheep, sweet lamb, unless we feed on your lips.
  • Maria. Two hot sheeps, marry.

    Boyet. And wherefore not ships?
    No sheep, sweet lamb, unless we feed on your lips.

17 II, 1, 719
  • So you grant pasture for me.
  • So you grant pasture for me.
  • Maria. You sheep, and I pasture: shall that finish the jest?

    Boyet. So you grant pasture for me.

18 II, 1, 723
  • Belonging to whom?
  • Belonging to whom?
  • Maria. Not so, gentle beast:
    My lips are no common, though several they be.

    Boyet. Belonging to whom?

19 II, 1, 728
  • If my observation, which very seldom lies,
    By the heart's still rhetoric dis...
  • If my observation, which very seldom lies,
    By the heart's still rhetoric disclosed with eyes,
    Deceive me not now, Navarre is infected.
  • Princess of France. Good wits will be jangling; but, gentles, agree:
    This civil war of wits were much better used
    On Navarre and his book-men; for here 'tis abused.

    Boyet. If my observation, which very seldom lies,
    By the heart's still rhetoric disclosed with eyes,
    Deceive me not now, Navarre is infected.

20 II, 1, 732
  • With that which we lovers entitle affected.
  • With that which we lovers entitle affected.
  • Princess of France. With what?

    Boyet. With that which we lovers entitle affected.

21 II, 1, 734
  • Why, all his behaviors did make their retire
    To the court of his eye, peepin...
  • Why, all his behaviors did make their retire
    To the court of his eye, peeping thorough desire:
    His heart, like an agate, with your print impress'd,
    Proud with his form, in his eye pride express'd:
    His tongue, all impatient to speak and not see,
    Did stumble with haste in his eyesight to be;
    All senses to that sense did make their repair,
    To feel only looking on fairest of fair:
    Methought all his senses were lock'd in his eye,
    As jewels in crystal for some prince to buy;
    Who, tendering their own worth from where they were glass'd,
    Did point you to buy them, along as you pass'd:
    His face's own margent did quote such amazes
    That all eyes saw his eyes enchanted with gazes.
    I'll give you Aquitaine and all that is his,
    An you give him for my sake but one loving kiss.
  • Princess of France. Your reason?

    Boyet. Why, all his behaviors did make their retire
    To the court of his eye, peeping thorough desire:
    His heart, like an agate, with your print impress'd,
    Proud with his form, in his eye pride express'd:
    His tongue, all impatient to speak and not see,
    Did stumble with haste in his eyesight to be;
    All senses to that sense did make their repair,
    To feel only looking on fairest of fair:
    Methought all his senses were lock'd in his eye,
    As jewels in crystal for some prince to buy;
    Who, tendering their own worth from where they were glass'd,
    Did point you to buy them, along as you pass'd:
    His face's own margent did quote such amazes
    That all eyes saw his eyes enchanted with gazes.
    I'll give you Aquitaine and all that is his,
    An you give him for my sake but one loving kiss.

22 II, 1, 751
  • But to speak that in words which his eye hath
    disclosed.
    I only have mad...
  • But to speak that in words which his eye hath
    disclosed.
    I only have made a mouth of his eye,
    By adding a tongue which I know will not lie.
  • Princess of France. Come to our pavilion: Boyet is disposed.

    Boyet. But to speak that in words which his eye hath
    disclosed.
    I only have made a mouth of his eye,
    By adding a tongue which I know will not lie.

23 II, 1, 758
  • Do you hear, my mad wenches?
  • Do you hear, my mad wenches?
  • Rosaline. Then was Venus like her mother, for her father is but grim.

    Boyet. Do you hear, my mad wenches?

24 II, 1, 760
  • What then, do you see?
  • What then, do you see?
  • Maria. No.

    Boyet. What then, do you see?

25 II, 1, 762
  • You are too hard for me.
  • You are too hard for me.
  • Rosaline. Ay, our way to be gone.

    Boyet. You are too hard for me.

26 IV, 1, 974
  • I know not; but I think it was not he.
  • I know not; but I think it was not he.
  • Princess of France. Was that the king, that spurred his horse so hard
    Against the steep uprising of the hill?

    Boyet. I know not; but I think it was not he.

27 IV, 1, 1008
  • Do not curst wives hold that self-sovereignty
    Only for praise sake, when the...
  • Do not curst wives hold that self-sovereignty
    Only for praise sake, when they strive to be
    Lords o'er their lords?
  • Princess of France. See see, my beauty will be saved by merit!
    O heresy in fair, fit for these days!
    A giving hand, though foul, shall have fair praise.
    But come, the bow: now mercy goes to kill,
    And shooting well is then accounted ill.
    Thus will I save my credit in the shoot:
    Not wounding, pity would not let me do't;
    If wounding, then it was to show my skill,
    That more for praise than purpose meant to kill.
    And out of question so it is sometimes,
    Glory grows guilty of detested crimes,
    When, for fame's sake, for praise, an outward part,
    We bend to that the working of the heart;
    As I for praise alone now seek to spill
    The poor deer's blood, that my heart means no ill.

    Boyet. Do not curst wives hold that self-sovereignty
    Only for praise sake, when they strive to be
    Lords o'er their lords?

28 IV, 1, 1013
  • Here comes a member of the commonwealth.
  • Here comes a member of the commonwealth.
  • Princess of France. Only for praise: and praise we may afford
    To any lady that subdues a lord.

    Boyet. Here comes a member of the commonwealth.

29 IV, 1, 1028
  • I am bound to serve.
    This letter is mistook, it importeth none here;
    It...
  • I am bound to serve.
    This letter is mistook, it importeth none here;
    It is writ to Jaquenetta.
  • Princess of France. O, thy letter, thy letter! he's a good friend of mine:
    Stand aside, good bearer. Boyet, you can carve;
    Break up this capon.

    Boyet. I am bound to serve.
    This letter is mistook, it importeth none here;
    It is writ to Jaquenetta.

30 IV, 1, 1034
  • 'By heaven, that thou art fair, is most infallible;
    true, that thou art beau...
  • 'By heaven, that thou art fair, is most infallible;
    true, that thou art beauteous; truth itself, that
    thou art lovely. More fairer than fair, beautiful
    than beauteous, truer than truth itself, have
    commiseration on thy heroical vassal! The
    magnanimous and most illustrate king Cophetua set
    eye upon the pernicious and indubitate beggar
    Zenelophon; and he it was that might rightly say,
    Veni, vidi, vici; which to annothanize in the
    vulgar,--O base and obscure vulgar!--videlicet, He
    came, saw, and overcame: he came, one; saw two;
    overcame, three. Who came? the king: why did he
    come? to see: why did he see? to overcome: to
    whom came he? to the beggar: what saw he? the
    beggar: who overcame he? the beggar. The
    conclusion is victory: on whose side? the king's.
    The captive is enriched: on whose side? the
    beggar's. The catastrophe is a nuptial: on whose
    side? the king's: no, on both in one, or one in
    both. I am the king; for so stands the comparison:
    thou the beggar; for so witnesseth thy lowliness.
    Shall I command thy love? I may: shall I enforce
    thy love? I could: shall I entreat thy love? I
    will. What shalt thou exchange for rags? robes;
    for tittles? titles; for thyself? me. Thus,
    expecting thy reply, I profane my lips on thy foot,
    my eyes on thy picture. and my heart on thy every
    part. Thine, in the dearest design of industry,
    DON ADRIANO DE ARMADO.'
    Thus dost thou hear the Nemean lion roar
    'Gainst thee, thou lamb, that standest as his prey.
    Submissive fall his princely feet before,
    And he from forage will incline to play:
    But if thou strive, poor soul, what art thou then?
    Food for his rage, repasture for his den.
  • (stage directions). [Reads]

    Boyet. 'By heaven, that thou art fair, is most infallible;
    true, that thou art beauteous; truth itself, that
    thou art lovely. More fairer than fair, beautiful
    than beauteous, truer than truth itself, have
    commiseration on thy heroical vassal! The
    magnanimous and most illustrate king Cophetua set
    eye upon the pernicious and indubitate beggar
    Zenelophon; and he it was that might rightly say,
    Veni, vidi, vici; which to annothanize in the
    vulgar,--O base and obscure vulgar!--videlicet, He
    came, saw, and overcame: he came, one; saw two;
    overcame, three. Who came? the king: why did he
    come? to see: why did he see? to overcome: to
    whom came he? to the beggar: what saw he? the
    beggar: who overcame he? the beggar. The
    conclusion is victory: on whose side? the king's.
    The captive is enriched: on whose side? the
    beggar's. The catastrophe is a nuptial: on whose
    side? the king's: no, on both in one, or one in
    both. I am the king; for so stands the comparison:
    thou the beggar; for so witnesseth thy lowliness.
    Shall I command thy love? I may: shall I enforce
    thy love? I could: shall I entreat thy love? I
    will. What shalt thou exchange for rags? robes;
    for tittles? titles; for thyself? me. Thus,
    expecting thy reply, I profane my lips on thy foot,
    my eyes on thy picture. and my heart on thy every
    part. Thine, in the dearest design of industry,
    DON ADRIANO DE ARMADO.'
    Thus dost thou hear the Nemean lion roar
    'Gainst thee, thou lamb, that standest as his prey.
    Submissive fall his princely feet before,
    And he from forage will incline to play:
    But if thou strive, poor soul, what art thou then?
    Food for his rage, repasture for his den.

31 IV, 1, 1071
  • I am much deceived but I remember the style.
  • I am much deceived but I remember the style.
  • Princess of France. What plume of feathers is he that indited this letter?
    What vane? what weathercock? did you ever hear better?

    Boyet. I am much deceived but I remember the style.

32 IV, 1, 1073
  • This Armado is a Spaniard, that keeps here in court;
    A phantasime, a Monarch...
  • This Armado is a Spaniard, that keeps here in court;
    A phantasime, a Monarcho, and one that makes sport
    To the prince and his bookmates.
  • Princess of France. Else your memory is bad, going o'er it erewhile.

    Boyet. This Armado is a Spaniard, that keeps here in court;
    A phantasime, a Monarcho, and one that makes sport
    To the prince and his bookmates.

33 IV, 1, 1088
  • Who is the suitor? who is the suitor?
  • Who is the suitor? who is the suitor?
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt PRINCESS and train]

    Boyet. Who is the suitor? who is the suitor?

34 IV, 1, 1090
  • Ay, my continent of beauty.
  • Ay, my continent of beauty.
  • Rosaline. Shall I teach you to know?

    Boyet. Ay, my continent of beauty.

35 IV, 1, 1093
  • My lady goes to kill horns; but, if thou marry,
    Hang me by the neck, if horn...
  • My lady goes to kill horns; but, if thou marry,
    Hang me by the neck, if horns that year miscarry.
    Finely put on!
  • Rosaline. Why, she that bears the bow.
    Finely put off!

    Boyet. My lady goes to kill horns; but, if thou marry,
    Hang me by the neck, if horns that year miscarry.
    Finely put on!

36 IV, 1, 1097
  • And who is your deer?
  • And who is your deer?
  • Rosaline. Well, then, I am the shooter.

    Boyet. And who is your deer?

37 IV, 1, 1102
  • But she herself is hit lower: have I hit her now?
  • But she herself is hit lower: have I hit her now?
  • Maria. You still wrangle with her, Boyet, and she strikes
    at the brow.

    Boyet. But she herself is hit lower: have I hit her now?

38 IV, 1, 1106
  • So I may answer thee with one as old, that was a
    woman when Queen Guinover o...
  • So I may answer thee with one as old, that was a
    woman when Queen Guinover of Britain was a little
    wench, as touching the hit it.
  • Rosaline. Shall I come upon thee with an old saying, that was
    a man when King Pepin of France was a little boy, as
    touching the hit it?

    Boyet. So I may answer thee with one as old, that was a
    woman when Queen Guinover of Britain was a little
    wench, as touching the hit it.

39 IV, 1, 1111
  • An I cannot, cannot, cannot,
    An I cannot, another can.
  • An I cannot, cannot, cannot,
    An I cannot, another can.
  • Rosaline. Thou canst not hit it, hit it, hit it,
    Thou canst not hit it, my good man.

    Boyet. An I cannot, cannot, cannot,
    An I cannot, another can.

40 IV, 1, 1116
  • A mark! O, mark but that mark! A mark, says my lady!
    Let the mark have a pri...
  • A mark! O, mark but that mark! A mark, says my lady!
    Let the mark have a prick in't, to mete at, if it may be.
  • Maria. A mark marvellous well shot, for they both did hit it.

    Boyet. A mark! O, mark but that mark! A mark, says my lady!
    Let the mark have a prick in't, to mete at, if it may be.

41 IV, 1, 1120
  • An if my hand be out, then belike your hand is in.
  • An if my hand be out, then belike your hand is in.
  • Costard. Indeed, a' must shoot nearer, or he'll ne'er hit the clout.

    Boyet. An if my hand be out, then belike your hand is in.

42 IV, 1, 1124
  • I fear too much rubbing. Good night, my good owl.
  • I fear too much rubbing. Good night, my good owl.
  • Costard. She's too hard for you at pricks, sir: challenge her to bowl.

    Boyet. I fear too much rubbing. Good night, my good owl.

43 V, 2, 1963
  • O, I am stabb'd with laughter! Where's her grace?
  • O, I am stabb'd with laughter! Where's her grace?
  • (stage directions). [Enter BOYET]

    Boyet. O, I am stabb'd with laughter! Where's her grace?

44 V, 2, 1965
  • Prepare, madam, prepare!
    Arm, wenches, arm! encounters mounted are
    Again...
  • Prepare, madam, prepare!
    Arm, wenches, arm! encounters mounted are
    Against your peace: Love doth approach disguised,
    Armed in arguments; you'll be surprised:
    Muster your wits; stand in your own defence;
    Or hide your heads like cowards, and fly hence.
  • Princess of France. Thy news Boyet?

    Boyet. Prepare, madam, prepare!
    Arm, wenches, arm! encounters mounted are
    Against your peace: Love doth approach disguised,
    Armed in arguments; you'll be surprised:
    Muster your wits; stand in your own defence;
    Or hide your heads like cowards, and fly hence.

45 V, 2, 1973
  • Under the cool shade of a sycamore
    I thought to close mine eyes some half an...
  • Under the cool shade of a sycamore
    I thought to close mine eyes some half an hour;
    When, lo! to interrupt my purposed rest,
    Toward that shade I might behold addrest
    The king and his companions: warily
    I stole into a neighbour thicket by,
    And overheard what you shall overhear,
    That, by and by, disguised they will be here.
    Their herald is a pretty knavish page,
    That well by heart hath conn'd his embassage:
    Action and accent did they teach him there;
    'Thus must thou speak,' and 'thus thy body bear:'
    And ever and anon they made a doubt
    Presence majestical would put him out,
    'For,' quoth the king, 'an angel shalt thou see;
    Yet fear not thou, but speak audaciously.'
    The boy replied, 'An angel is not evil;
    I should have fear'd her had she been a devil.'
    With that, all laugh'd and clapp'd him on the shoulder,
    Making the bold wag by their praises bolder:
    One rubb'd his elbow thus, and fleer'd and swore
    A better speech was never spoke before;
    Another, with his finger and his thumb,
    Cried, 'Via! we will do't, come what will come;'
    The third he caper'd, and cried, 'All goes well;'
    The fourth turn'd on the toe, and down he fell.
    With that, they all did tumble on the ground,
    With such a zealous laughter, so profound,
    That in this spleen ridiculous appears,
    To cheque their folly, passion's solemn tears.
  • Princess of France. Saint Denis to Saint Cupid! What are they
    That charge their breath against us? say, scout, say.

    Boyet. Under the cool shade of a sycamore
    I thought to close mine eyes some half an hour;
    When, lo! to interrupt my purposed rest,
    Toward that shade I might behold addrest
    The king and his companions: warily
    I stole into a neighbour thicket by,
    And overheard what you shall overhear,
    That, by and by, disguised they will be here.
    Their herald is a pretty knavish page,
    That well by heart hath conn'd his embassage:
    Action and accent did they teach him there;
    'Thus must thou speak,' and 'thus thy body bear:'
    And ever and anon they made a doubt
    Presence majestical would put him out,
    'For,' quoth the king, 'an angel shalt thou see;
    Yet fear not thou, but speak audaciously.'
    The boy replied, 'An angel is not evil;
    I should have fear'd her had she been a devil.'
    With that, all laugh'd and clapp'd him on the shoulder,
    Making the bold wag by their praises bolder:
    One rubb'd his elbow thus, and fleer'd and swore
    A better speech was never spoke before;
    Another, with his finger and his thumb,
    Cried, 'Via! we will do't, come what will come;'
    The third he caper'd, and cried, 'All goes well;'
    The fourth turn'd on the toe, and down he fell.
    With that, they all did tumble on the ground,
    With such a zealous laughter, so profound,
    That in this spleen ridiculous appears,
    To cheque their folly, passion's solemn tears.

46 V, 2, 2004
  • They do, they do: and are apparell'd thus.
    Like Muscovites or Russians, as I...
  • They do, they do: and are apparell'd thus.
    Like Muscovites or Russians, as I guess.
    Their purpose is to parle, to court and dance;
    And every one his love-feat will advance
    Unto his several mistress, which they'll know
    By favours several which they did bestow.
  • Princess of France. But what, but what, come they to visit us?

    Boyet. They do, they do: and are apparell'd thus.
    Like Muscovites or Russians, as I guess.
    Their purpose is to parle, to court and dance;
    And every one his love-feat will advance
    Unto his several mistress, which they'll know
    By favours several which they did bestow.

47 V, 2, 2033
  • Why, that contempt will kill the speaker's heart,
    And quite divorce his memo...
  • Why, that contempt will kill the speaker's heart,
    And quite divorce his memory from his part.
  • Princess of France. No, to the death, we will not move a foot;
    Nor to their penn'd speech render we no grace,
    But while 'tis spoke each turn away her face.

    Boyet. Why, that contempt will kill the speaker's heart,
    And quite divorce his memory from his part.

48 V, 2, 2042
  • The trumpet sounds: be mask'd; the maskers come.
    [The Ladies mask]
    [Ente...
  • The trumpet sounds: be mask'd; the maskers come.
    [The Ladies mask]
    [Enter Blackamoors with music; MOTH; FERDINAND,]
    BIRON, LONGAVILLE, and DUMAIN, in Russian habits,
    and masked]
  • (stage directions). [Trumpets sound within]

    Boyet. The trumpet sounds: be mask'd; the maskers come.
    [The Ladies mask]
    [Enter Blackamoors with music; MOTH; FERDINAND,]
    BIRON, LONGAVILLE, and DUMAIN, in Russian habits,
    and masked]

49 V, 2, 2048
  • Beauties no richer than rich taffeta.
  • Beauties no richer than rich taffeta.
  • Moth. All hail, the richest beauties on the earth!--

    Boyet. Beauties no richer than rich taffeta.

50 V, 2, 2054
  • True; out indeed.
  • True; out indeed.
  • Moth. That ever turn'd their eyes to mortal views!--Out--

    Boyet. True; out indeed.

51 V, 2, 2060
  • They will not answer to that epithet;
    You were best call it 'daughter-beamed...
  • They will not answer to that epithet;
    You were best call it 'daughter-beamed eyes.'
  • Moth. Once to behold with your sun-beamed eyes,
    --with your sun-beamed eyes--

    Boyet. They will not answer to that epithet;
    You were best call it 'daughter-beamed eyes.'

52 V, 2, 2069
  • What would you with the princess?
  • What would you with the princess?
  • Rosaline. What would these strangers? know their minds, Boyet:
    If they do speak our language, 'tis our will:
    That some plain man recount their purposes
    Know what they would.

    Boyet. What would you with the princess?

53 V, 2, 2072
  • Nothing but peace and gentle visitation.
  • Nothing but peace and gentle visitation.
  • Rosaline. What would they, say they?

    Boyet. Nothing but peace and gentle visitation.

54 V, 2, 2074
  • She says, you have it, and you may be gone.
  • She says, you have it, and you may be gone.
  • Rosaline. Why, that they have; and bid them so be gone.

    Boyet. She says, you have it, and you may be gone.

55 V, 2, 2077
  • They say, that they have measured many a mile
    To tread a measure with you on...
  • They say, that they have measured many a mile
    To tread a measure with you on this grass.
  • Ferdinand. Say to her, we have measured many miles
    To tread a measure with her on this grass.

    Boyet. They say, that they have measured many a mile
    To tread a measure with you on this grass.

56 V, 2, 2082
  • If to come hither you have measured miles,
    And many miles, the princess bids...
  • If to come hither you have measured miles,
    And many miles, the princess bids you tell
    How many inches doth fill up one mile.
  • Rosaline. It is not so. Ask them how many inches
    Is in one mile: if they have measured many,
    The measure then of one is easily told.

    Boyet. If to come hither you have measured miles,
    And many miles, the princess bids you tell
    How many inches doth fill up one mile.

57 V, 2, 2086
  • She hears herself.
  • She hears herself.
  • Biron. Tell her, we measure them by weary steps.

    Boyet. She hears herself.

58 V, 2, 2166
  • The tongues of mocking wenches are as keen
    As is the razor's edge invisible,...
  • The tongues of mocking wenches are as keen
    As is the razor's edge invisible,
    Cutting a smaller hair than may be seen,
    Above the sense of sense; so sensible
    Seemeth their conference; their conceits have wings
    Fleeter than arrows, bullets, wind, thought, swifter things.
  • (stage directions). [They converse apart]

    Boyet. The tongues of mocking wenches are as keen
    As is the razor's edge invisible,
    Cutting a smaller hair than may be seen,
    Above the sense of sense; so sensible
    Seemeth their conference; their conceits have wings
    Fleeter than arrows, bullets, wind, thought, swifter things.

59 V, 2, 2178
  • Tapers they are, with your sweet breaths puff'd out.
  • Tapers they are, with your sweet breaths puff'd out.
  • Princess of France. Twenty adieus, my frozen Muscovits.
    [Exeunt FERDINAND, Lords, and Blackamoors]
    Are these the breed of wits so wonder'd at?

    Boyet. Tapers they are, with your sweet breaths puff'd out.

60 V, 2, 2199
  • Madam, and pretty mistresses, give ear:
    Immediately they will again be here...
  • Madam, and pretty mistresses, give ear:
    Immediately they will again be here
    In their own shapes; for it can never be
    They will digest this harsh indignity.
  • Maria. Dumain is mine, as sure as bark on tree.

    Boyet. Madam, and pretty mistresses, give ear:
    Immediately they will again be here
    In their own shapes; for it can never be
    They will digest this harsh indignity.

61 V, 2, 2204
  • They will, they will, God knows,
    And leap for joy, though they are lame with...
  • They will, they will, God knows,
    And leap for joy, though they are lame with blows:
    Therefore change favours; and, when they repair,
    Blow like sweet roses in this summer air.
  • Princess of France. Will they return?

    Boyet. They will, they will, God knows,
    And leap for joy, though they are lame with blows:
    Therefore change favours; and, when they repair,
    Blow like sweet roses in this summer air.

62 V, 2, 2209
  • Fair ladies mask'd are roses in their bud;
    Dismask'd, their damask sweet com...
  • Fair ladies mask'd are roses in their bud;
    Dismask'd, their damask sweet commixture shown,
    Are angels vailing clouds, or roses blown.
  • Princess of France. How blow? how blow? speak to be understood.

    Boyet. Fair ladies mask'd are roses in their bud;
    Dismask'd, their damask sweet commixture shown,
    Are angels vailing clouds, or roses blown.

63 V, 2, 2222
  • Ladies, withdraw: the gallants are at hand.
  • Ladies, withdraw: the gallants are at hand.
  • Rosaline. Good madam, if by me you'll be advised,
    Let's, mock them still, as well known as disguised:
    Let us complain to them what fools were here,
    Disguised like Muscovites, in shapeless gear;
    And wonder what they were and to what end
    Their shallow shows and prologue vilely penn'd
    And their rough carriage so ridiculous,
    Should be presented at our tent to us.

    Boyet. Ladies, withdraw: the gallants are at hand.

64 V, 2, 2228
  • Gone to her tent. Please it your majesty
    Command me any service to her thith...
  • Gone to her tent. Please it your majesty
    Command me any service to her thither?
  • Ferdinand. Fair sir, God save you! Where's the princess?

    Boyet. Gone to her tent. Please it your majesty
    Command me any service to her thither?

65 V, 2, 2231
  • I will; and so will she, I know, my lord.
  • I will; and so will she, I know, my lord.
  • Ferdinand. That she vouchsafe me audience for one word.

    Boyet. I will; and so will she, I know, my lord.

66 V, 2, 2410
  • Full merrily
    Hath this brave manage, this career, been run.
  • Full merrily
    Hath this brave manage, this career, been run.
  • Biron. Neither of either; I remit both twain.
    I see the trick on't: here was a consent,
    Knowing aforehand of our merriment,
    To dash it like a Christmas comedy:
    Some carry-tale, some please-man, some slight zany,
    Some mumble-news, some trencher-knight, some Dick,
    That smiles his cheek in years and knows the trick
    To make my lady laugh when she's disposed,
    Told our intents before; which once disclosed,
    The ladies did change favours: and then we,
    Following the signs, woo'd but the sign of she.
    Now, to our perjury to add more terror,
    We are again forsworn, in will and error.
    Much upon this it is: and might not you
    [To BOYET]
    Forestall our sport, to make us thus untrue?
    Do not you know my lady's foot by the squier,
    And laugh upon the apple of her eye?
    And stand between her back, sir, and the fire,
    Holding a trencher, jesting merrily?
    You put our page out: go, you are allow'd;
    Die when you will, a smock shall be your shroud.
    You leer upon me, do you? there's an eye
    Wounds like a leaden sword.

    Boyet. Full merrily
    Hath this brave manage, this career, been run.

67 V, 2, 2482
  • You lie, you are not he.
  • You lie, you are not he.
  • Costard. I Pompey am,--

    Boyet. You lie, you are not he.

68 V, 2, 2484
  • With libbard's head on knee.
  • With libbard's head on knee.
  • Costard. I Pompey am,--

    Boyet. With libbard's head on knee.

69 V, 2, 2506
  • Your nose says, no, you are not for it stands too right.
  • Your nose says, no, you are not for it stands too right.
  • Sir Nathaniel. When in the world I lived, I was the world's
    commander;
    By east, west, north, and south, I spread my
    conquering might:
    My scutcheon plain declares that I am Alisander,--

    Boyet. Your nose says, no, you are not for it stands too right.

70 V, 2, 2511
  • Most true, 'tis right; you were so, Alisander.
  • Most true, 'tis right; you were so, Alisander.
  • Sir Nathaniel. When in the world I lived, I was the world's
    commander,--

    Boyet. Most true, 'tis right; you were so, Alisander.

71 V, 2, 2546
  • To make Judas hang himself.
  • To make Judas hang himself.
  • Holofernes. What mean you, sir?

    Boyet. To make Judas hang himself.

72 V, 2, 2552
  • A cittern-head.
  • A cittern-head.
  • Holofernes. What is this?

    Boyet. A cittern-head.

73 V, 2, 2556
  • The pommel of Caesar's falchion.
  • The pommel of Caesar's falchion.
  • Longaville. The face of an old Roman coin, scarce seen.

    Boyet. The pommel of Caesar's falchion.

74 V, 2, 2566
  • Therefore, as he is an ass, let him go.
    And so adieu, sweet Jude! nay, why d...
  • Therefore, as he is an ass, let him go.
    And so adieu, sweet Jude! nay, why dost thou stay?
  • Biron. An thou wert a lion, we would do so.

    Boyet. Therefore, as he is an ass, let him go.
    And so adieu, sweet Jude! nay, why dost thou stay?

75 V, 2, 2571
  • A light for Monsieur Judas! it grows dark, he may stumble.
  • A light for Monsieur Judas! it grows dark, he may stumble.
  • Holofernes. This is not generous, not gentle, not humble.

    Boyet. A light for Monsieur Judas! it grows dark, he may stumble.

76 V, 2, 2578
  • But is this Hector?
  • But is this Hector?
  • Ferdinand. Hector was but a Troyan in respect of this.

    Boyet. But is this Hector?

77 V, 2, 2582
  • No; he is best endued in the small.
  • No; he is best endued in the small.
  • Dumain. More calf, certain.

    Boyet. No; he is best endued in the small.

78 V, 2, 2609
  • [Aside to DUMAIN] Loves her by the foot,--
  • [Aside to DUMAIN] Loves her by the foot,--
  • Don Adriano de Armado. I do adore thy sweet grace's slipper.

    Boyet. [Aside to DUMAIN] Loves her by the foot,--

79 V, 2, 2624
  • Renowned Pompey!
  • Renowned Pompey!
  • Dumain. Most rare Pompey!

    Boyet. Renowned Pompey!

80 V, 2, 2650
  • True, and it was enjoined him in Rome for want of
    linen: since when, I'll be...
  • True, and it was enjoined him in Rome for want of
    linen: since when, I'll be sworn, he wore none but
    a dishclout of Jaquenetta's, and that a' wears next
    his heart for a favour.
  • Don Adriano de Armado. The naked truth of it is, I have no shirt; I go
    woolward for penance.

    Boyet. True, and it was enjoined him in Rome for want of
    linen: since when, I'll be sworn, he wore none but
    a dishclout of Jaquenetta's, and that a' wears next
    his heart for a favour.

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