Speeches (Lines) for Caliban in "The Tempest"

Total: 50
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 2
  • [Within] There's wood enough within.
  • [Within] There's wood enough within.
  • Prospero. But, as 'tis,
    We cannot miss him: he does make our fire,
    Fetch in our wood and serves in offices
    That profit us. What, ho! slave! Caliban!
    Thou earth, thou! speak.

    Caliban. [Within] There's wood enough within.

2 I / 2
  • As wicked dew as e'er my mother brush'd
    With raven's feather from unwholesom...
  • As wicked dew as e'er my mother brush'd
    With raven's feather from unwholesome fen
    Drop on you both! a south-west blow on ye
    And blister you all o'er!
  • Prospero. Thou poisonous slave, got by the devil himself
    Upon thy wicked dam, come forth!

    Caliban. As wicked dew as e'er my mother brush'd
    With raven's feather from unwholesome fen
    Drop on you both! a south-west blow on ye
    And blister you all o'er!

3 I / 2
  • I must eat my dinner.
    This island's mine, by Sycorax my mother,
    Which th...
  • I must eat my dinner.
    This island's mine, by Sycorax my mother,
    Which thou takest from me. When thou camest first,
    Thou strokedst me and madest much of me, wouldst give me
    Water with berries in't, and teach me how
    To name the bigger light, and how the less,
    That burn by day and night: and then I loved thee
    And show'd thee all the qualities o' the isle,
    The fresh springs, brine-pits, barren place and fertile:
    Cursed be I that did so! All the charms
    Of Sycorax, toads, beetles, bats, light on you!
    For I am all the subjects that you have,
    Which first was mine own king: and here you sty me
    In this hard rock, whiles you do keep from me
    The rest o' the island.
  • Prospero. For this, be sure, to-night thou shalt have cramps,
    Side-stitches that shall pen thy breath up; urchins
    Shall, for that vast of night that they may work,
    All exercise on thee; thou shalt be pinch'd
    As thick as honeycomb, each pinch more stinging
    Than bees that made 'em.

    Caliban. I must eat my dinner.
    This island's mine, by Sycorax my mother,
    Which thou takest from me. When thou camest first,
    Thou strokedst me and madest much of me, wouldst give me
    Water with berries in't, and teach me how
    To name the bigger light, and how the less,
    That burn by day and night: and then I loved thee
    And show'd thee all the qualities o' the isle,
    The fresh springs, brine-pits, barren place and fertile:
    Cursed be I that did so! All the charms
    Of Sycorax, toads, beetles, bats, light on you!
    For I am all the subjects that you have,
    Which first was mine own king: and here you sty me
    In this hard rock, whiles you do keep from me
    The rest o' the island.

4 I / 2
  • O ho, O ho! would't had been done!
    Thou didst prevent me; I had peopled else...
  • O ho, O ho! would't had been done!
    Thou didst prevent me; I had peopled else
    This isle with Calibans.
  • Prospero. Thou most lying slave,
    Whom stripes may move, not kindness! I have used thee,
    Filth as thou art, with human care, and lodged thee
    In mine own cell, till thou didst seek to violate
    The honour of my child.

    Caliban. O ho, O ho! would't had been done!
    Thou didst prevent me; I had peopled else
    This isle with Calibans.

5 I / 2
  • You taught me language; and my profit on't
    Is, I know how to curse. The red...
  • You taught me language; and my profit on't
    Is, I know how to curse. The red plague rid you
    For learning me your language!
  • Prospero. Abhorred slave,
    Which any print of goodness wilt not take,
    Being capable of all ill! I pitied thee,
    Took pains to make thee speak, taught thee each hour
    One thing or other: when thou didst not, savage,
    Know thine own meaning, but wouldst gabble like
    A thing most brutish, I endow'd thy purposes
    With words that made them known. But thy vile race,
    Though thou didst learn, had that in't which
    good natures
    Could not abide to be with; therefore wast thou
    Deservedly confined into this rock,
    Who hadst deserved more than a prison.

    Caliban. You taught me language; and my profit on't
    Is, I know how to curse. The red plague rid you
    For learning me your language!

6 I / 2
  • No, pray thee.
    [Aside]
    I must obey: his art is of such power,
    It wou...
  • No, pray thee.
    [Aside]
    I must obey: his art is of such power,
    It would control my dam's god, Setebos,
    and make a vassal of him.
  • Prospero. Hag-seed, hence!
    Fetch us in fuel; and be quick, thou'rt best,
    To answer other business. Shrug'st thou, malice?
    If thou neglect'st or dost unwillingly
    What I command, I'll rack thee with old cramps,
    Fill all thy bones with aches, make thee roar
    That beasts shall tremble at thy din.

    Caliban. No, pray thee.
    [Aside]
    I must obey: his art is of such power,
    It would control my dam's god, Setebos,
    and make a vassal of him.

7 II / 2
  • All the infections that the sun sucks up
    From bogs, fens, flats, on Prosper...
  • All the infections that the sun sucks up
    From bogs, fens, flats, on Prosper fall and make him
    By inch-meal a disease! His spirits hear me
    And yet I needs must curse. But they'll nor pinch,
    Fright me with urchin--shows, pitch me i' the mire,
    Nor lead me, like a firebrand, in the dark
    Out of my way, unless he bid 'em; but
    For every trifle are they set upon me;
    Sometime like apes that mow and chatter at me
    And after bite me, then like hedgehogs which
    Lie tumbling in my barefoot way and mount
    Their pricks at my footfall; sometime am I
    All wound with adders who with cloven tongues
    Do hiss me into madness.
    [Enter TRINCULO]
    Lo, now, lo!
    Here comes a spirit of his, and to torment me
    For bringing wood in slowly. I'll fall flat;
    Perchance he will not mind me.
  • Ariel. Prospero my lord shall know what I have done:
    So, king, go safely on to seek thy son.

    Caliban. All the infections that the sun sucks up
    From bogs, fens, flats, on Prosper fall and make him
    By inch-meal a disease! His spirits hear me
    And yet I needs must curse. But they'll nor pinch,
    Fright me with urchin--shows, pitch me i' the mire,
    Nor lead me, like a firebrand, in the dark
    Out of my way, unless he bid 'em; but
    For every trifle are they set upon me;
    Sometime like apes that mow and chatter at me
    And after bite me, then like hedgehogs which
    Lie tumbling in my barefoot way and mount
    Their pricks at my footfall; sometime am I
    All wound with adders who with cloven tongues
    Do hiss me into madness.
    [Enter TRINCULO]
    Lo, now, lo!
    Here comes a spirit of his, and to torment me
    For bringing wood in slowly. I'll fall flat;
    Perchance he will not mind me.

8 II / 2
  • Do not torment me: Oh!
  • Do not torment me: Oh!
  • Stephano. I shall no more to sea, to sea,
    Here shall I die ashore--
    This is a very scurvy tune to sing at a man's
    funeral: well, here's my comfort. [Drinks]
    [Sings]
    The master, the swabber, the boatswain and I,
    The gunner and his mate
    Loved Mall, Meg and Marian and Margery,
    But none of us cared for Kate;
    For she had a tongue with a tang,
    Would cry to a sailor, Go hang!
    She loved not the savour of tar nor of pitch,
    Yet a tailor might scratch her where'er she did itch:
    Then to sea, boys, and let her go hang!
    This is a scurvy tune too: but here's my comfort.

    Caliban. Do not torment me: Oh!

9 II / 2
  • The spirit torments me; Oh!
  • The spirit torments me; Oh!
  • Stephano. What's the matter? Have we devils here? Do you put
    tricks upon's with savages and men of Ind, ha? I
    have not scaped drowning to be afeard now of your
    four legs; for it hath been said, As proper a man as
    ever went on four legs cannot make him give ground;
    and it shall be said so again while Stephano
    breathes at's nostrils.

    Caliban. The spirit torments me; Oh!

10 II / 2
  • Do not torment me, prithee; I'll bring my wood home faster.
  • Do not torment me, prithee; I'll bring my wood home faster.
  • Stephano. This is some monster of the isle with four legs, who
    hath got, as I take it, an ague. Where the devil
    should he learn our language? I will give him some
    relief, if it be but for that. if I can recover him
    and keep him tame and get to Naples with him, he's a
    present for any emperor that ever trod on neat's leather.

    Caliban. Do not torment me, prithee; I'll bring my wood home faster.

11 II / 2
  • Thou dost me yet but little hurt; thou wilt anon, I
    know it by thy trembling...
  • Thou dost me yet but little hurt; thou wilt anon, I
    know it by thy trembling: now Prosper works upon thee.
  • Stephano. He's in his fit now and does not talk after the
    wisest. He shall taste of my bottle: if he have
    never drunk wine afore will go near to remove his
    fit. If I can recover him and keep him tame, I will
    not take too much for him; he shall pay for him that
    hath him, and that soundly.

    Caliban. Thou dost me yet but little hurt; thou wilt anon, I
    know it by thy trembling: now Prosper works upon thee.

12 II / 2
  • [Aside] These be fine things, an if they be
    not sprites.
    That's a brave...
  • [Aside] These be fine things, an if they be
    not sprites.
    That's a brave god and bears celestial liquor.
    I will kneel to him.
  • Stephano. Prithee, do not turn me about; my stomach is not constant.

    Caliban. [Aside] These be fine things, an if they be
    not sprites.
    That's a brave god and bears celestial liquor.
    I will kneel to him.

13 II / 2
  • I'll swear upon that bottle to be thy true subject;
    for the liquor is not ea...
  • I'll swear upon that bottle to be thy true subject;
    for the liquor is not earthly.
  • Stephano. How didst thou 'scape? How camest thou hither?
    swear by this bottle how thou camest hither. I
    escaped upon a butt of sack which the sailors
    heaved o'erboard, by this bottle; which I made of
    the bark of a tree with mine own hands since I was
    cast ashore.

    Caliban. I'll swear upon that bottle to be thy true subject;
    for the liquor is not earthly.

14 II / 2
  • Hast thou not dropp'd from heaven?
  • Hast thou not dropp'd from heaven?
  • Stephano. The whole butt, man: my cellar is in a rock by the
    sea-side where my wine is hid. How now, moon-calf!
    how does thine ague?

    Caliban. Hast thou not dropp'd from heaven?

15 II / 2
  • I have seen thee in her and I do adore thee:
    My mistress show'd me thee and...
  • I have seen thee in her and I do adore thee:
    My mistress show'd me thee and thy dog and thy bush.
  • Stephano. Out o' the moon, I do assure thee: I was the man i'
    the moon when time was.

    Caliban. I have seen thee in her and I do adore thee:
    My mistress show'd me thee and thy dog and thy bush.

16 II / 2
  • I'll show thee every fertile inch o' th' island;
    And I will kiss thy foot: I...
  • I'll show thee every fertile inch o' th' island;
    And I will kiss thy foot: I prithee, be my god.
  • Trinculo. By this good light, this is a very shallow monster!
    I afeard of him! A very weak monster! The man i'
    the moon! A most poor credulous monster! Well
    drawn, monster, in good sooth!

    Caliban. I'll show thee every fertile inch o' th' island;
    And I will kiss thy foot: I prithee, be my god.

17 II / 2
  • I'll kiss thy foot; I'll swear myself thy subject.
  • I'll kiss thy foot; I'll swear myself thy subject.
  • Trinculo. By this light, a most perfidious and drunken
    monster! when 's god's asleep, he'll rob his bottle.

    Caliban. I'll kiss thy foot; I'll swear myself thy subject.

18 II / 2
  • I'll show thee the best springs; I'll pluck thee berries;
    I'll fish for thee...
  • I'll show thee the best springs; I'll pluck thee berries;
    I'll fish for thee and get thee wood enough.
    A plague upon the tyrant that I serve!
    I'll bear him no more sticks, but follow thee,
    Thou wondrous man.
  • Trinculo. But that the poor monster's in drink: an abominable monster!

    Caliban. I'll show thee the best springs; I'll pluck thee berries;
    I'll fish for thee and get thee wood enough.
    A plague upon the tyrant that I serve!
    I'll bear him no more sticks, but follow thee,
    Thou wondrous man.

19 II / 2
  • I prithee, let me bring thee where crabs grow;
    And I with my long nails will...
  • I prithee, let me bring thee where crabs grow;
    And I with my long nails will dig thee pignuts;
    Show thee a jay's nest and instruct thee how
    To snare the nimble marmoset; I'll bring thee
    To clustering filberts and sometimes I'll get thee
    Young scamels from the rock. Wilt thou go with me?
  • Trinculo. A most ridiculous monster, to make a wonder of a
    Poor drunkard!

    Caliban. I prithee, let me bring thee where crabs grow;
    And I with my long nails will dig thee pignuts;
    Show thee a jay's nest and instruct thee how
    To snare the nimble marmoset; I'll bring thee
    To clustering filberts and sometimes I'll get thee
    Young scamels from the rock. Wilt thou go with me?

20 II / 2
  • [Sings drunkenly]
    Farewell master; farewell, farewell!
  • [Sings drunkenly]
    Farewell master; farewell, farewell!
  • Stephano. I prithee now, lead the way without any more
    talking. Trinculo, the king and all our company
    else being drowned, we will inherit here: here;
    bear my bottle: fellow Trinculo, we'll fill him by
    and by again.

    Caliban. [Sings drunkenly]
    Farewell master; farewell, farewell!

21 II / 2
  • No more dams I'll make for fish
    Nor fetch in firing
    At requiring;
    No...
  • No more dams I'll make for fish
    Nor fetch in firing
    At requiring;
    Nor scrape trencher, nor wash dish
    'Ban, 'Ban, Cacaliban
    Has a new master: get a new man.
    Freedom, hey-day! hey-day, freedom! freedom,
    hey-day, freedom!
  • Trinculo. A howling monster: a drunken monster!

    Caliban. No more dams I'll make for fish
    Nor fetch in firing
    At requiring;
    Nor scrape trencher, nor wash dish
    'Ban, 'Ban, Cacaliban
    Has a new master: get a new man.
    Freedom, hey-day! hey-day, freedom! freedom,
    hey-day, freedom!

22 III / 2
  • How does thy honour? Let me lick thy shoe.
    I'll not serve him; he's not vali...
  • How does thy honour? Let me lick thy shoe.
    I'll not serve him; he's not valiant.
  • Stephano. Moon-calf, speak once in thy life, if thou beest a
    good moon-calf.

    Caliban. How does thy honour? Let me lick thy shoe.
    I'll not serve him; he's not valiant.

23 III / 2
  • Lo, how he mocks me! wilt thou let him, my lord?
  • Lo, how he mocks me! wilt thou let him, my lord?
  • Trinculo. Thou liest, most ignorant monster: I am in case to
    justle a constable. Why, thou deboshed fish thou,
    was there ever man a coward that hath drunk so much
    sack as I to-day? Wilt thou tell a monstrous lie,
    being but half a fish and half a monster?

    Caliban. Lo, how he mocks me! wilt thou let him, my lord?

24 III / 2
  • Lo, lo, again! bite him to death, I prithee.
  • Lo, lo, again! bite him to death, I prithee.
  • Trinculo. 'Lord' quoth he! That a monster should be such a natural!

    Caliban. Lo, lo, again! bite him to death, I prithee.

25 III / 2
  • I thank my noble lord. Wilt thou be pleased to
    hearken once again to the sui...
  • I thank my noble lord. Wilt thou be pleased to
    hearken once again to the suit I made to thee?
  • Stephano. Trinculo, keep a good tongue in your head: if you
    prove a mutineer,--the next tree! The poor monster's
    my subject and he shall not suffer indignity.

    Caliban. I thank my noble lord. Wilt thou be pleased to
    hearken once again to the suit I made to thee?

26 III / 2
  • As I told thee before, I am subject to a tyrant, a
    sorcerer, that by his cun...
  • As I told thee before, I am subject to a tyrant, a
    sorcerer, that by his cunning hath cheated me of the island.
  • Stephano. Marry, will I. kneel and repeat it; I will stand,
    and so shall Trinculo.

    Caliban. As I told thee before, I am subject to a tyrant, a
    sorcerer, that by his cunning hath cheated me of the island.

27 III / 2
  • Thou liest, thou jesting monkey, thou: I would my
    valiant master would destr...
  • Thou liest, thou jesting monkey, thou: I would my
    valiant master would destroy thee! I do not lie.
  • Ariel. Thou liest.

    Caliban. Thou liest, thou jesting monkey, thou: I would my
    valiant master would destroy thee! I do not lie.

28 III / 2
  • I say, by sorcery he got this isle;
    From me he got it. if thy greatness will...
  • I say, by sorcery he got this isle;
    From me he got it. if thy greatness will
    Revenge it on him,--for I know thou darest,
    But this thing dare not,--
  • Stephano. Mum, then, and no more. Proceed.

    Caliban. I say, by sorcery he got this isle;
    From me he got it. if thy greatness will
    Revenge it on him,--for I know thou darest,
    But this thing dare not,--

29 III / 2
  • Thou shalt be lord of it and I'll serve thee.
  • Thou shalt be lord of it and I'll serve thee.
  • Stephano. That's most certain.

    Caliban. Thou shalt be lord of it and I'll serve thee.

30 III / 2
  • Yea, yea, my lord: I'll yield him thee asleep,
    Where thou mayst knock a nail...
  • Yea, yea, my lord: I'll yield him thee asleep,
    Where thou mayst knock a nail into his bead.
  • Stephano. How now shall this be compassed?
    Canst thou bring me to the party?

    Caliban. Yea, yea, my lord: I'll yield him thee asleep,
    Where thou mayst knock a nail into his bead.

31 III / 2
  • What a pied ninny's this! Thou scurvy patch!
    I do beseech thy greatness, giv...
  • What a pied ninny's this! Thou scurvy patch!
    I do beseech thy greatness, give him blows
    And take his bottle from him: when that's gone
    He shall drink nought but brine; for I'll not show him
    Where the quick freshes are.
  • Ariel. Thou liest; thou canst not.

    Caliban. What a pied ninny's this! Thou scurvy patch!
    I do beseech thy greatness, give him blows
    And take his bottle from him: when that's gone
    He shall drink nought but brine; for I'll not show him
    Where the quick freshes are.

32 III / 2
  • Ha, ha, ha!
  • Ha, ha, ha!
  • Trinculo. I did not give the lie. Out o' your
    wits and bearing too? A pox o' your bottle!
    this can sack and drinking do. A murrain on
    your monster, and the devil take your fingers!

    Caliban. Ha, ha, ha!

33 III / 2
  • Beat him enough: after a little time
    I'll beat him too.
  • Beat him enough: after a little time
    I'll beat him too.
  • Stephano. Now, forward with your tale. Prithee, stand farther
    off.

    Caliban. Beat him enough: after a little time
    I'll beat him too.

34 III / 2
  • Why, as I told thee, 'tis a custom with him,
    I' th' afternoon to sleep: ther...
  • Why, as I told thee, 'tis a custom with him,
    I' th' afternoon to sleep: there thou mayst brain him,
    Having first seized his books, or with a log
    Batter his skull, or paunch him with a stake,
    Or cut his wezand with thy knife. Remember
    First to possess his books; for without them
    He's but a sot, as I am, nor hath not
    One spirit to command: they all do hate him
    As rootedly as I. Burn but his books.
    He has brave utensils,--for so he calls them--
    Which when he has a house, he'll deck withal
    And that most deeply to consider is
    The beauty of his daughter; he himself
    Calls her a nonpareil: I never saw a woman,
    But only Sycorax my dam and she;
    But she as far surpasseth Sycorax
    As great'st does least.
  • Stephano. Stand farther. Come, proceed.

    Caliban. Why, as I told thee, 'tis a custom with him,
    I' th' afternoon to sleep: there thou mayst brain him,
    Having first seized his books, or with a log
    Batter his skull, or paunch him with a stake,
    Or cut his wezand with thy knife. Remember
    First to possess his books; for without them
    He's but a sot, as I am, nor hath not
    One spirit to command: they all do hate him
    As rootedly as I. Burn but his books.
    He has brave utensils,--for so he calls them--
    Which when he has a house, he'll deck withal
    And that most deeply to consider is
    The beauty of his daughter; he himself
    Calls her a nonpareil: I never saw a woman,
    But only Sycorax my dam and she;
    But she as far surpasseth Sycorax
    As great'st does least.

35 III / 2
  • Ay, lord; she will become thy bed, I warrant.
    And bring thee forth brave bro...
  • Ay, lord; she will become thy bed, I warrant.
    And bring thee forth brave brood.
  • Stephano. Is it so brave a lass?

    Caliban. Ay, lord; she will become thy bed, I warrant.
    And bring thee forth brave brood.

36 III / 2
  • Within this half hour will he be asleep:
    Wilt thou destroy him then?
  • Within this half hour will he be asleep:
    Wilt thou destroy him then?
  • Stephano. Give me thy hand: I am sorry I beat thee; but,
    while thou livest, keep a good tongue in thy head.

    Caliban. Within this half hour will he be asleep:
    Wilt thou destroy him then?

37 III / 2
  • Thou makest me merry; I am full of pleasure:
    Let us be jocund: will you trol...
  • Thou makest me merry; I am full of pleasure:
    Let us be jocund: will you troll the catch
    You taught me but while-ere?
  • Ariel. This will I tell my master.

    Caliban. Thou makest me merry; I am full of pleasure:
    Let us be jocund: will you troll the catch
    You taught me but while-ere?

38 III / 2
  • That's not the tune.
  • That's not the tune.
  • Stephano. At thy request, monster, I will do reason, any
    reason. Come on, Trinculo, let us sing.
    [Sings]
    Flout 'em and scout 'em
    And scout 'em and flout 'em
    Thought is free.

    Caliban. That's not the tune.

39 III / 2
  • Art thou afeard?
  • Art thou afeard?
  • Stephano. He that dies pays all debts: I defy thee. Mercy upon us!

    Caliban. Art thou afeard?

40 III / 2
  • Be not afeard; the isle is full of noises,
    Sounds and sweet airs, that give...
  • Be not afeard; the isle is full of noises,
    Sounds and sweet airs, that give delight and hurt not.
    Sometimes a thousand twangling instruments
    Will hum about mine ears, and sometime voices
    That, if I then had waked after long sleep,
    Will make me sleep again: and then, in dreaming,
    The clouds methought would open and show riches
    Ready to drop upon me that, when I waked,
    I cried to dream again.
  • Stephano. No, monster, not I.

    Caliban. Be not afeard; the isle is full of noises,
    Sounds and sweet airs, that give delight and hurt not.
    Sometimes a thousand twangling instruments
    Will hum about mine ears, and sometime voices
    That, if I then had waked after long sleep,
    Will make me sleep again: and then, in dreaming,
    The clouds methought would open and show riches
    Ready to drop upon me that, when I waked,
    I cried to dream again.

41 III / 2
  • When Prospero is destroyed.
  • When Prospero is destroyed.
  • Stephano. This will prove a brave kingdom to me, where I shall
    have my music for nothing.

    Caliban. When Prospero is destroyed.

42 IV / 1
  • Pray you, tread softly, that the blind mole may not
    Hear a foot fall: we now...
  • Pray you, tread softly, that the blind mole may not
    Hear a foot fall: we now are near his cell.
  • Prospero. A devil, a born devil, on whose nature
    Nurture can never stick; on whom my pains,
    Humanely taken, all, all lost, quite lost;
    And as with age his body uglier grows,
    So his mind cankers. I will plague them all,
    Even to roaring.
    [Re-enter ARIEL, loaden with glistering apparel, &c]
    Come, hang them on this line.
    [PROSPERO and ARIEL remain invisible. Enter]
    CALIBAN, STEPHANO, and TRINCULO, all wet]

    Caliban. Pray you, tread softly, that the blind mole may not
    Hear a foot fall: we now are near his cell.

43 IV / 1
  • Good my lord, give me thy favour still.
    Be patient, for the prize I'll bring...
  • Good my lord, give me thy favour still.
    Be patient, for the prize I'll bring thee to
    Shall hoodwink this mischance: therefore speak softly.
    All's hush'd as midnight yet.
  • Trinculo. Thou wert but a lost monster.

    Caliban. Good my lord, give me thy favour still.
    Be patient, for the prize I'll bring thee to
    Shall hoodwink this mischance: therefore speak softly.
    All's hush'd as midnight yet.

44 IV / 1
  • Prithee, my king, be quiet. Seest thou here,
    This is the mouth o' the cell:...
  • Prithee, my king, be quiet. Seest thou here,
    This is the mouth o' the cell: no noise, and enter.
    Do that good mischief which may make this island
    Thine own for ever, and I, thy Caliban,
    For aye thy foot-licker.
  • Stephano. I will fetch off my bottle, though I be o'er ears
    for my labour.

    Caliban. Prithee, my king, be quiet. Seest thou here,
    This is the mouth o' the cell: no noise, and enter.
    Do that good mischief which may make this island
    Thine own for ever, and I, thy Caliban,
    For aye thy foot-licker.

45 IV / 1
  • Let it alone, thou fool; it is but trash.
  • Let it alone, thou fool; it is but trash.
  • Trinculo. O king Stephano! O peer! O worthy Stephano! look
    what a wardrobe here is for thee!

    Caliban. Let it alone, thou fool; it is but trash.

46 IV / 1
  • The dropsy drown this fool I what do you mean
    To dote thus on such luggage?...
  • The dropsy drown this fool I what do you mean
    To dote thus on such luggage? Let's alone
    And do the murder first: if he awake,
    From toe to crown he'll fill our skins with pinches,
    Make us strange stuff.
  • Trinculo. Thy grace shall have it.

    Caliban. The dropsy drown this fool I what do you mean
    To dote thus on such luggage? Let's alone
    And do the murder first: if he awake,
    From toe to crown he'll fill our skins with pinches,
    Make us strange stuff.

47 IV / 1
  • I will have none on't: we shall lose our time,
    And all be turn'd to barnacle...
  • I will have none on't: we shall lose our time,
    And all be turn'd to barnacles, or to apes
    With foreheads villanous low.
  • Trinculo. Monster, come, put some lime upon your fingers, and
    away with the rest.

    Caliban. I will have none on't: we shall lose our time,
    And all be turn'd to barnacles, or to apes
    With foreheads villanous low.

48 V / 1
  • O Setebos, these be brave spirits indeed!
    How fine my master is! I am afraid...
  • O Setebos, these be brave spirits indeed!
    How fine my master is! I am afraid
    He will chastise me.
  • Trinculo. If these be true spies which I wear in my head,
    here's a goodly sight.

    Caliban. O Setebos, these be brave spirits indeed!
    How fine my master is! I am afraid
    He will chastise me.

49 V / 1
  • I shall be pinch'd to death.
  • I shall be pinch'd to death.
  • Prospero. Mark but the badges of these men, my lords,
    Then say if they be true. This mis-shapen knave,
    His mother was a witch, and one so strong
    That could control the moon, make flows and ebbs,
    And deal in her command without her power.
    These three have robb'd me; and this demi-devil--
    For he's a bastard one--had plotted with them
    To take my life. Two of these fellows you
    Must know and own; this thing of darkness!
    Acknowledge mine.

    Caliban. I shall be pinch'd to death.

50 V / 1
  • Ay, that I will; and I'll be wise hereafter
    And seek for grace. What a thric...
  • Ay, that I will; and I'll be wise hereafter
    And seek for grace. What a thrice-double ass
    Was I, to take this drunkard for a god
    And worship this dull fool!
  • Prospero. He is as disproportion'd in his manners
    As in his shape. Go, sirrah, to my cell;
    Take with you your companions; as you look
    To have my pardon, trim it handsomely.

    Caliban. Ay, that I will; and I'll be wise hereafter
    And seek for grace. What a thrice-double ass
    Was I, to take this drunkard for a god
    And worship this dull fool!

© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.