Speeches (Lines) for Capulet in "The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet"

Total: 51
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# Act, Scene, Line Speech text
1 I, 1, 93
  • What noise is this? Give me my long sword, ho!
  • What noise is this? Give me my long sword, ho!
  • (stage directions). [Enter CAPULET in his gown, and LADY CAPULET]

    Capulet. What noise is this? Give me my long sword, ho!

2 I, 1, 95
  • My sword, I say! Old Montague is come,
    And flourishes his blade in spite of...
  • My sword, I say! Old Montague is come,
    And flourishes his blade in spite of me.
  • Lady Capulet. A crutch, a crutch! why call you for a sword?

    Capulet. My sword, I say! Old Montague is come,
    And flourishes his blade in spite of me.

3 I, 2, 271
  • But Montague is bound as well as I,
    In penalty alike; and 'tis not hard, I t...
  • But Montague is bound as well as I,
    In penalty alike; and 'tis not hard, I think,
    For men so old as we to keep the peace.
  • (stage directions). [Enter CAPULET, PARIS, and Servant]

    Capulet. But Montague is bound as well as I,
    In penalty alike; and 'tis not hard, I think,
    For men so old as we to keep the peace.

4 I, 2, 277
  • But saying o'er what I have said before:
    My child is yet a stranger in the w...
  • But saying o'er what I have said before:
    My child is yet a stranger in the world;
    She hath not seen the change of fourteen years,
    Let two more summers wither in their pride,
    Ere we may think her ripe to be a bride.
  • Paris. Of honourable reckoning are you both;
    And pity 'tis you lived at odds so long.
    But now, my lord, what say you to my suit?

    Capulet. But saying o'er what I have said before:
    My child is yet a stranger in the world;
    She hath not seen the change of fourteen years,
    Let two more summers wither in their pride,
    Ere we may think her ripe to be a bride.

5 I, 2, 283
  • And too soon marr'd are those so early made.
    The earth hath swallow'd all my...
  • And too soon marr'd are those so early made.
    The earth hath swallow'd all my hopes but she,
    She is the hopeful lady of my earth:
    But woo her, gentle Paris, get her heart,
    My will to her consent is but a part;
    An she agree, within her scope of choice
    Lies my consent and fair according voice.
    This night I hold an old accustom'd feast,
    Whereto I have invited many a guest,
    Such as I love; and you, among the store,
    One more, most welcome, makes my number more.
    At my poor house look to behold this night
    Earth-treading stars that make dark heaven light:
    Such comfort as do lusty young men feel
    When well-apparell'd April on the heel
    Of limping winter treads, even such delight
    Among fresh female buds shall you this night
    Inherit at my house; hear all, all see,
    And like her most whose merit most shall be:
    Which on more view, of many mine being one
    May stand in number, though in reckoning none,
    Come, go with me.
    [To Servant, giving a paper]
    Go, sirrah, trudge about
    Through fair Verona; find those persons out
    Whose names are written there, and to them say,
    My house and welcome on their pleasure stay.
  • Paris. Younger than she are happy mothers made.

    Capulet. And too soon marr'd are those so early made.
    The earth hath swallow'd all my hopes but she,
    She is the hopeful lady of my earth:
    But woo her, gentle Paris, get her heart,
    My will to her consent is but a part;
    An she agree, within her scope of choice
    Lies my consent and fair according voice.
    This night I hold an old accustom'd feast,
    Whereto I have invited many a guest,
    Such as I love; and you, among the store,
    One more, most welcome, makes my number more.
    At my poor house look to behold this night
    Earth-treading stars that make dark heaven light:
    Such comfort as do lusty young men feel
    When well-apparell'd April on the heel
    Of limping winter treads, even such delight
    Among fresh female buds shall you this night
    Inherit at my house; hear all, all see,
    And like her most whose merit most shall be:
    Which on more view, of many mine being one
    May stand in number, though in reckoning none,
    Come, go with me.
    [To Servant, giving a paper]
    Go, sirrah, trudge about
    Through fair Verona; find those persons out
    Whose names are written there, and to them say,
    My house and welcome on their pleasure stay.

6 I, 5, 634
  • Welcome, gentlemen! ladies that have their toes
    Unplagued with corns will ha...
  • Welcome, gentlemen! ladies that have their toes
    Unplagued with corns will have a bout with you.
    Ah ha, my mistresses! which of you all
    Will now deny to dance? she that makes dainty,
    She, I'll swear, hath corns; am I come near ye now?
    Welcome, gentlemen! I have seen the day
    That I have worn a visor and could tell
    A whispering tale in a fair lady's ear,
    Such as would please: 'tis gone, 'tis gone, 'tis gone:
    You are welcome, gentlemen! come, musicians, play.
    A hall, a hall! give room! and foot it, girls.
    [Music plays, and they dance]
    More light, you knaves; and turn the tables up,
    And quench the fire, the room is grown too hot.
    Ah, sirrah, this unlook'd-for sport comes well.
    Nay, sit, nay, sit, good cousin Capulet;
    For you and I are past our dancing days:
    How long is't now since last yourself and I
    Were in a mask?
  • (stage directions). [Enter CAPULET, with JULIET and others of his house, meeting the Guests and Maskers]

    Capulet. Welcome, gentlemen! ladies that have their toes
    Unplagued with corns will have a bout with you.
    Ah ha, my mistresses! which of you all
    Will now deny to dance? she that makes dainty,
    She, I'll swear, hath corns; am I come near ye now?
    Welcome, gentlemen! I have seen the day
    That I have worn a visor and could tell
    A whispering tale in a fair lady's ear,
    Such as would please: 'tis gone, 'tis gone, 'tis gone:
    You are welcome, gentlemen! come, musicians, play.
    A hall, a hall! give room! and foot it, girls.
    [Music plays, and they dance]
    More light, you knaves; and turn the tables up,
    And quench the fire, the room is grown too hot.
    Ah, sirrah, this unlook'd-for sport comes well.
    Nay, sit, nay, sit, good cousin Capulet;
    For you and I are past our dancing days:
    How long is't now since last yourself and I
    Were in a mask?

7 I, 5, 654
  • What, man! 'tis not so much, 'tis not so much:
    'Tis since the nuptials of Lu...
  • What, man! 'tis not so much, 'tis not so much:
    'Tis since the nuptials of Lucentio,
    Come pentecost as quickly as it will,
    Some five and twenty years; and then we mask'd.
  • Second Capulet. By'r lady, thirty years.

    Capulet. What, man! 'tis not so much, 'tis not so much:
    'Tis since the nuptials of Lucentio,
    Come pentecost as quickly as it will,
    Some five and twenty years; and then we mask'd.

8 I, 5, 660
  • Will you tell me that?
    His son was but a ward two years ago.
  • Will you tell me that?
    His son was but a ward two years ago.
  • Second Capulet. 'Tis more, 'tis more, his son is elder, sir;
    His son is thirty.

    Capulet. Will you tell me that?
    His son was but a ward two years ago.

9 I, 5, 682
  • Why, how now, kinsman! wherefore storm you so?
  • Why, how now, kinsman! wherefore storm you so?
  • Tybalt. This, by his voice, should be a Montague.
    Fetch me my rapier, boy. What dares the slave
    Come hither, cover'd with an antic face,
    To fleer and scorn at our solemnity?
    Now, by the stock and honour of my kin,
    To strike him dead, I hold it not a sin.

    Capulet. Why, how now, kinsman! wherefore storm you so?

10 I, 5, 686
  • Young Romeo is it?
  • Young Romeo is it?
  • Tybalt. Uncle, this is a Montague, our foe,
    A villain that is hither come in spite,
    To scorn at our solemnity this night.

    Capulet. Young Romeo is it?

11 I, 5, 688
  • Content thee, gentle coz, let him alone;
    He bears him like a portly gentlema...
  • Content thee, gentle coz, let him alone;
    He bears him like a portly gentleman;
    And, to say truth, Verona brags of him
    To be a virtuous and well-govern'd youth:
    I would not for the wealth of all the town
    Here in my house do him disparagement:
    Therefore be patient, take no note of him:
    It is my will, the which if thou respect,
    Show a fair presence and put off these frowns,
    And ill-beseeming semblance for a feast.
  • Tybalt. 'Tis he, that villain Romeo.

    Capulet. Content thee, gentle coz, let him alone;
    He bears him like a portly gentleman;
    And, to say truth, Verona brags of him
    To be a virtuous and well-govern'd youth:
    I would not for the wealth of all the town
    Here in my house do him disparagement:
    Therefore be patient, take no note of him:
    It is my will, the which if thou respect,
    Show a fair presence and put off these frowns,
    And ill-beseeming semblance for a feast.

12 I, 5, 700
  • He shall be endured:
    What, goodman boy! I say, he shall: go to;
    Am I the...
  • He shall be endured:
    What, goodman boy! I say, he shall: go to;
    Am I the master here, or you? go to.
    You'll not endure him! God shall mend my soul!
    You'll make a mutiny among my guests!
    You will set cock-a-hoop! you'll be the man!
  • Tybalt. It fits, when such a villain is a guest:
    I'll not endure him.

    Capulet. He shall be endured:
    What, goodman boy! I say, he shall: go to;
    Am I the master here, or you? go to.
    You'll not endure him! God shall mend my soul!
    You'll make a mutiny among my guests!
    You will set cock-a-hoop! you'll be the man!

13 I, 5, 707
  • Go to, go to;
    You are a saucy boy: is't so, indeed?
    This trick may chanc...
  • Go to, go to;
    You are a saucy boy: is't so, indeed?
    This trick may chance to scathe you, I know what:
    You must contrary me! marry, 'tis time.
    Well said, my hearts! You are a princox; go:
    Be quiet, or--More light, more light! For shame!
    I'll make you quiet. What, cheerly, my hearts!
  • Tybalt. Why, uncle, 'tis a shame.

    Capulet. Go to, go to;
    You are a saucy boy: is't so, indeed?
    This trick may chance to scathe you, I know what:
    You must contrary me! marry, 'tis time.
    Well said, my hearts! You are a princox; go:
    Be quiet, or--More light, more light! For shame!
    I'll make you quiet. What, cheerly, my hearts!

14 I, 5, 750
  • Nay, gentlemen, prepare not to be gone;
    We have a trifling foolish banquet t...
  • Nay, gentlemen, prepare not to be gone;
    We have a trifling foolish banquet towards.
    Is it e'en so? why, then, I thank you all
    I thank you, honest gentlemen; good night.
    More torches here! Come on then, let's to bed.
    Ah, sirrah, by my fay, it waxes late:
    I'll to my rest.
  • Romeo. Ay, so I fear; the more is my unrest.

    Capulet. Nay, gentlemen, prepare not to be gone;
    We have a trifling foolish banquet towards.
    Is it e'en so? why, then, I thank you all
    I thank you, honest gentlemen; good night.
    More torches here! Come on then, let's to bed.
    Ah, sirrah, by my fay, it waxes late:
    I'll to my rest.

15 III, 4, 2059
  • Things have fall'n out, sir, so unluckily,
    That we have had no time to move...
  • Things have fall'n out, sir, so unluckily,
    That we have had no time to move our daughter:
    Look you, she loved her kinsman Tybalt dearly,
    And so did I:--Well, we were born to die.
    'Tis very late, she'll not come down to-night:
    I promise you, but for your company,
    I would have been a-bed an hour ago.
  • (stage directions). [Enter CAPULET, LADY CAPULET, and PARIS]

    Capulet. Things have fall'n out, sir, so unluckily,
    That we have had no time to move our daughter:
    Look you, she loved her kinsman Tybalt dearly,
    And so did I:--Well, we were born to die.
    'Tis very late, she'll not come down to-night:
    I promise you, but for your company,
    I would have been a-bed an hour ago.

16 III, 4, 2070
  • Sir Paris, I will make a desperate tender
    Of my child's love: I think she wi...
  • Sir Paris, I will make a desperate tender
    Of my child's love: I think she will be ruled
    In all respects by me; nay, more, I doubt it not.
    Wife, go you to her ere you go to bed;
    Acquaint her here of my son Paris' love;
    And bid her, mark you me, on Wednesday next--
    But, soft! what day is this?
  • Lady Capulet. I will, and know her mind early to-morrow;
    To-night she is mew'd up to her heaviness.

    Capulet. Sir Paris, I will make a desperate tender
    Of my child's love: I think she will be ruled
    In all respects by me; nay, more, I doubt it not.
    Wife, go you to her ere you go to bed;
    Acquaint her here of my son Paris' love;
    And bid her, mark you me, on Wednesday next--
    But, soft! what day is this?

17 III, 4, 2078
  • Monday! ha, ha! Well, Wednesday is too soon,
    O' Thursday let it be: o' Thurs...
  • Monday! ha, ha! Well, Wednesday is too soon,
    O' Thursday let it be: o' Thursday, tell her,
    She shall be married to this noble earl.
    Will you be ready? do you like this haste?
    We'll keep no great ado,--a friend or two;
    For, hark you, Tybalt being slain so late,
    It may be thought we held him carelessly,
    Being our kinsman, if we revel much:
    Therefore we'll have some half a dozen friends,
    And there an end. But what say you to Thursday?
  • Paris. Monday, my lord,

    Capulet. Monday! ha, ha! Well, Wednesday is too soon,
    O' Thursday let it be: o' Thursday, tell her,
    She shall be married to this noble earl.
    Will you be ready? do you like this haste?
    We'll keep no great ado,--a friend or two;
    For, hark you, Tybalt being slain so late,
    It may be thought we held him carelessly,
    Being our kinsman, if we revel much:
    Therefore we'll have some half a dozen friends,
    And there an end. But what say you to Thursday?

18 III, 4, 2089
  • Well get you gone: o' Thursday be it, then.
    Go you to Juliet ere you go to b...
  • Well get you gone: o' Thursday be it, then.
    Go you to Juliet ere you go to bed,
    Prepare her, wife, against this wedding-day.
    Farewell, my lord. Light to my chamber, ho!
    Afore me! it is so very very late,
    That we may call it early by and by.
    Good night.
  • Paris. My lord, I would that Thursday were to-morrow.

    Capulet. Well get you gone: o' Thursday be it, then.
    Go you to Juliet ere you go to bed,
    Prepare her, wife, against this wedding-day.
    Farewell, my lord. Light to my chamber, ho!
    Afore me! it is so very very late,
    That we may call it early by and by.
    Good night.

19 III, 5, 2233
  • When the sun sets, the air doth drizzle dew;
    But for the sunset of my brothe...
  • When the sun sets, the air doth drizzle dew;
    But for the sunset of my brother's son
    It rains downright.
    How now! a conduit, girl? what, still in tears?
    Evermore showering? In one little body
    Thou counterfeit'st a bark, a sea, a wind;
    For still thy eyes, which I may call the sea,
    Do ebb and flow with tears; the bark thy body is,
    Sailing in this salt flood; the winds, thy sighs;
    Who, raging with thy tears, and they with them,
    Without a sudden calm, will overset
    Thy tempest-tossed body. How now, wife!
    Have you deliver'd to her our decree?
  • (stage directions). [Enter CAPULET and Nurse]

    Capulet. When the sun sets, the air doth drizzle dew;
    But for the sunset of my brother's son
    It rains downright.
    How now! a conduit, girl? what, still in tears?
    Evermore showering? In one little body
    Thou counterfeit'st a bark, a sea, a wind;
    For still thy eyes, which I may call the sea,
    Do ebb and flow with tears; the bark thy body is,
    Sailing in this salt flood; the winds, thy sighs;
    Who, raging with thy tears, and they with them,
    Without a sudden calm, will overset
    Thy tempest-tossed body. How now, wife!
    Have you deliver'd to her our decree?

20 III, 5, 2248
  • Soft! take me with you, take me with you, wife.
    How! will she none? doth she...
  • Soft! take me with you, take me with you, wife.
    How! will she none? doth she not give us thanks?
    Is she not proud? doth she not count her blest,
    Unworthy as she is, that we have wrought
    So worthy a gentleman to be her bridegroom?
  • Lady Capulet. Ay, sir; but she will none, she gives you thanks.
    I would the fool were married to her grave!

    Capulet. Soft! take me with you, take me with you, wife.
    How! will she none? doth she not give us thanks?
    Is she not proud? doth she not count her blest,
    Unworthy as she is, that we have wrought
    So worthy a gentleman to be her bridegroom?

21 III, 5, 2256
  • How now, how now, chop-logic! What is this?
    'Proud,' and 'I thank you,' and...
  • How now, how now, chop-logic! What is this?
    'Proud,' and 'I thank you,' and 'I thank you not;'
    And yet 'not proud,' mistress minion, you,
    Thank me no thankings, nor, proud me no prouds,
    But fettle your fine joints 'gainst Thursday next,
    To go with Paris to Saint Peter's Church,
    Or I will drag thee on a hurdle thither.
    Out, you green-sickness carrion! out, you baggage!
    You tallow-face!
  • Juliet. Not proud, you have; but thankful, that you have:
    Proud can I never be of what I hate;
    But thankful even for hate, that is meant love.

    Capulet. How now, how now, chop-logic! What is this?
    'Proud,' and 'I thank you,' and 'I thank you not;'
    And yet 'not proud,' mistress minion, you,
    Thank me no thankings, nor, proud me no prouds,
    But fettle your fine joints 'gainst Thursday next,
    To go with Paris to Saint Peter's Church,
    Or I will drag thee on a hurdle thither.
    Out, you green-sickness carrion! out, you baggage!
    You tallow-face!

22 III, 5, 2268
  • Hang thee, young baggage! disobedient wretch!
    I tell thee what: get thee to...
  • Hang thee, young baggage! disobedient wretch!
    I tell thee what: get thee to church o' Thursday,
    Or never after look me in the face:
    Speak not, reply not, do not answer me;
    My fingers itch. Wife, we scarce thought us blest
    That God had lent us but this only child;
    But now I see this one is one too much,
    And that we have a curse in having her:
    Out on her, hilding!
  • Juliet. Good father, I beseech you on my knees,
    Hear me with patience but to speak a word.

    Capulet. Hang thee, young baggage! disobedient wretch!
    I tell thee what: get thee to church o' Thursday,
    Or never after look me in the face:
    Speak not, reply not, do not answer me;
    My fingers itch. Wife, we scarce thought us blest
    That God had lent us but this only child;
    But now I see this one is one too much,
    And that we have a curse in having her:
    Out on her, hilding!

23 III, 5, 2279
  • And why, my lady wisdom? hold your tongue,
    Good prudence; smatter with your...
  • And why, my lady wisdom? hold your tongue,
    Good prudence; smatter with your gossips, go.
  • Nurse. God in heaven bless her!
    You are to blame, my lord, to rate her so.

    Capulet. And why, my lady wisdom? hold your tongue,
    Good prudence; smatter with your gossips, go.

24 III, 5, 2282
  • O, God ye god-den.
  • O, God ye god-den.
  • Nurse. I speak no treason.

    Capulet. O, God ye god-den.

25 III, 5, 2284
  • Peace, you mumbling fool!
    Utter your gravity o'er a gossip's bowl;
    For h...
  • Peace, you mumbling fool!
    Utter your gravity o'er a gossip's bowl;
    For here we need it not.
  • Nurse. May not one speak?

    Capulet. Peace, you mumbling fool!
    Utter your gravity o'er a gossip's bowl;
    For here we need it not.

26 III, 5, 2288
  • God's bread! it makes me mad:
    Day, night, hour, tide, time, work, play,
    ...
  • God's bread! it makes me mad:
    Day, night, hour, tide, time, work, play,
    Alone, in company, still my care hath been
    To have her match'd: and having now provided
    A gentleman of noble parentage,
    Of fair demesnes, youthful, and nobly train'd,
    Stuff'd, as they say, with honourable parts,
    Proportion'd as one's thought would wish a man;
    And then to have a wretched puling fool,
    A whining mammet, in her fortune's tender,
    To answer 'I'll not wed; I cannot love,
    I am too young; I pray you, pardon me.'
    But, as you will not wed, I'll pardon you:
    Graze where you will you shall not house with me:
    Look to't, think on't, I do not use to jest.
    Thursday is near; lay hand on heart, advise:
    An you be mine, I'll give you to my friend;
    And you be not, hang, beg, starve, die in
    the streets,
    For, by my soul, I'll ne'er acknowledge thee,
    Nor what is mine shall never do thee good:
    Trust to't, bethink you; I'll not be forsworn.
  • Lady Capulet. You are too hot.

    Capulet. God's bread! it makes me mad:
    Day, night, hour, tide, time, work, play,
    Alone, in company, still my care hath been
    To have her match'd: and having now provided
    A gentleman of noble parentage,
    Of fair demesnes, youthful, and nobly train'd,
    Stuff'd, as they say, with honourable parts,
    Proportion'd as one's thought would wish a man;
    And then to have a wretched puling fool,
    A whining mammet, in her fortune's tender,
    To answer 'I'll not wed; I cannot love,
    I am too young; I pray you, pardon me.'
    But, as you will not wed, I'll pardon you:
    Graze where you will you shall not house with me:
    Look to't, think on't, I do not use to jest.
    Thursday is near; lay hand on heart, advise:
    An you be mine, I'll give you to my friend;
    And you be not, hang, beg, starve, die in
    the streets,
    For, by my soul, I'll ne'er acknowledge thee,
    Nor what is mine shall never do thee good:
    Trust to't, bethink you; I'll not be forsworn.

27 IV, 2, 2495
  • So many guests invite as here are writ.
    [Exit First Servant]
    Sirrah, go...
  • So many guests invite as here are writ.
    [Exit First Servant]
    Sirrah, go hire me twenty cunning cooks.
  • (stage directions). [Enter CAPULET, LADY CAPULET, Nurse, and two Servingmen]

    Capulet. So many guests invite as here are writ.
    [Exit First Servant]
    Sirrah, go hire me twenty cunning cooks.

28 IV, 2, 2500
  • How canst thou try them so?
  • How canst thou try them so?
  • Second Servant. You shall have none ill, sir; for I'll try if they
    can lick their fingers.

    Capulet. How canst thou try them so?

29 IV, 2, 2504
  • Go, be gone.
    [Exit Second Servant]
    We shall be much unfurnished for this...
  • Go, be gone.
    [Exit Second Servant]
    We shall be much unfurnished for this time.
    What, is my daughter gone to Friar Laurence?
  • Second Servant. Marry, sir, 'tis an ill cook that cannot lick his
    own fingers: therefore he that cannot lick his
    fingers goes not with me.

    Capulet. Go, be gone.
    [Exit Second Servant]
    We shall be much unfurnished for this time.
    What, is my daughter gone to Friar Laurence?

30 IV, 2, 2509
  • Well, he may chance to do some good on her:
    A peevish self-will'd harlotry i...
  • Well, he may chance to do some good on her:
    A peevish self-will'd harlotry it is.
  • Nurse. Ay, forsooth.

    Capulet. Well, he may chance to do some good on her:
    A peevish self-will'd harlotry it is.

31 IV, 2, 2513
  • How now, my headstrong! where have you been gadding?
  • How now, my headstrong! where have you been gadding?
  • (stage directions). [Enter JULIET]

    Capulet. How now, my headstrong! where have you been gadding?

32 IV, 2, 2520
  • Send for the county; go tell him of this:
    I'll have this knot knit up to-mor...
  • Send for the county; go tell him of this:
    I'll have this knot knit up to-morrow morning.
  • Juliet. Where I have learn'd me to repent the sin
    Of disobedient opposition
    To you and your behests, and am enjoin'd
    By holy Laurence to fall prostrate here,
    And beg your pardon: pardon, I beseech you!
    Henceforward I am ever ruled by you.

    Capulet. Send for the county; go tell him of this:
    I'll have this knot knit up to-morrow morning.

33 IV, 2, 2525
  • Why, I am glad on't; this is well: stand up:
    This is as't should be. Let me...
  • Why, I am glad on't; this is well: stand up:
    This is as't should be. Let me see the county;
    Ay, marry, go, I say, and fetch him hither.
    Now, afore God! this reverend holy friar,
    Our whole city is much bound to him.
  • Juliet. I met the youthful lord at Laurence' cell;
    And gave him what becomed love I might,
    Not step o'er the bounds of modesty.

    Capulet. Why, I am glad on't; this is well: stand up:
    This is as't should be. Let me see the county;
    Ay, marry, go, I say, and fetch him hither.
    Now, afore God! this reverend holy friar,
    Our whole city is much bound to him.

34 IV, 2, 2534
  • Go, nurse, go with her: we'll to church to-morrow.
  • Go, nurse, go with her: we'll to church to-morrow.
  • Lady Capulet. No, not till Thursday; there is time enough.

    Capulet. Go, nurse, go with her: we'll to church to-morrow.

35 IV, 2, 2538
  • Tush, I will stir about,
    And all things shall be well, I warrant thee, wife:...
  • Tush, I will stir about,
    And all things shall be well, I warrant thee, wife:
    Go thou to Juliet, help to deck up her;
    I'll not to bed to-night; let me alone;
    I'll play the housewife for this once. What, ho!
    They are all forth. Well, I will walk myself
    To County Paris, to prepare him up
    Against to-morrow: my heart is wondrous light,
    Since this same wayward girl is so reclaim'd.
  • Lady Capulet. We shall be short in our provision:
    'Tis now near night.

    Capulet. Tush, I will stir about,
    And all things shall be well, I warrant thee, wife:
    Go thou to Juliet, help to deck up her;
    I'll not to bed to-night; let me alone;
    I'll play the housewife for this once. What, ho!
    They are all forth. Well, I will walk myself
    To County Paris, to prepare him up
    Against to-morrow: my heart is wondrous light,
    Since this same wayward girl is so reclaim'd.

36 IV, 4, 2616
  • Come, stir, stir, stir! the second cock hath crow'd,
    The curfew-bell hath ru...
  • Come, stir, stir, stir! the second cock hath crow'd,
    The curfew-bell hath rung, 'tis three o'clock:
    Look to the baked meats, good Angelica:
    Spare not for the cost.
  • (stage directions). [Enter CAPULET]

    Capulet. Come, stir, stir, stir! the second cock hath crow'd,
    The curfew-bell hath rung, 'tis three o'clock:
    Look to the baked meats, good Angelica:
    Spare not for the cost.

37 IV, 4, 2623
  • No, not a whit: what! I have watch'd ere now
    All night for lesser cause, and...
  • No, not a whit: what! I have watch'd ere now
    All night for lesser cause, and ne'er been sick.
  • Nurse. Go, you cot-quean, go,
    Get you to bed; faith, You'll be sick to-morrow
    For this night's watching.

    Capulet. No, not a whit: what! I have watch'd ere now
    All night for lesser cause, and ne'er been sick.

38 IV, 4, 2628
  • A jealous hood, a jealous hood!
  • A jealous hood, a jealous hood!
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt LADY CAPULET and Nurse]

    Capulet. A jealous hood, a jealous hood!

39 IV, 4, 2630
  • Now, fellow,
    What's there?
  • Now, fellow,
    What's there?
  • (stage directions). [Enter three or four Servingmen, with spits, logs, and baskets]

    Capulet. Now, fellow,
    What's there?

40 IV, 4, 2633
  • Make haste, make haste.
    [Exit First Servant]
    Sirrah, fetch drier logs: <...
  • Make haste, make haste.
    [Exit First Servant]
    Sirrah, fetch drier logs:
    Call Peter, he will show thee where they are.
  • First Servant. Things for the cook, sir; but I know not what.

    Capulet. Make haste, make haste.
    [Exit First Servant]
    Sirrah, fetch drier logs:
    Call Peter, he will show thee where they are.

41 IV, 4, 2640
  • Mass, and well said; a merry whoreson, ha!
    Thou shalt be logger-head. Good f...
  • Mass, and well said; a merry whoreson, ha!
    Thou shalt be logger-head. Good faith, 'tis day:
    The county will be here with music straight,
    For so he said he would: I hear him near.
    [Music within]
    Nurse! Wife! What, ho! What, nurse, I say!
    [Re-enter Nurse]
    Go waken Juliet, go and trim her up;
    I'll go and chat with Paris: hie, make haste,
    Make haste; the bridegroom he is come already:
    Make haste, I say.
  • (stage directions). [Exit]

    Capulet. Mass, and well said; a merry whoreson, ha!
    Thou shalt be logger-head. Good faith, 'tis day:
    The county will be here with music straight,
    For so he said he would: I hear him near.
    [Music within]
    Nurse! Wife! What, ho! What, nurse, I say!
    [Re-enter Nurse]
    Go waken Juliet, go and trim her up;
    I'll go and chat with Paris: hie, make haste,
    Make haste; the bridegroom he is come already:
    Make haste, I say.

42 IV, 5, 2679
  • For shame, bring Juliet forth; her lord is come.
  • For shame, bring Juliet forth; her lord is come.
  • (stage directions). [Enter CAPULET]

    Capulet. For shame, bring Juliet forth; her lord is come.

43 IV, 5, 2682
  • Ha! let me see her: out, alas! she's cold:
    Her blood is settled, and her joi...
  • Ha! let me see her: out, alas! she's cold:
    Her blood is settled, and her joints are stiff;
    Life and these lips have long been separated:
    Death lies on her like an untimely frost
    Upon the sweetest flower of all the field.
  • Lady Capulet. Alack the day, she's dead, she's dead, she's dead!

    Capulet. Ha! let me see her: out, alas! she's cold:
    Her blood is settled, and her joints are stiff;
    Life and these lips have long been separated:
    Death lies on her like an untimely frost
    Upon the sweetest flower of all the field.

44 IV, 5, 2689
  • Death, that hath ta'en her hence to make me wail,
    Ties up my tongue, and wil...
  • Death, that hath ta'en her hence to make me wail,
    Ties up my tongue, and will not let me speak.
  • Lady Capulet. O woful time!

    Capulet. Death, that hath ta'en her hence to make me wail,
    Ties up my tongue, and will not let me speak.

45 IV, 5, 2693
  • Ready to go, but never to return.
    O son! the night before thy wedding-day
  • Ready to go, but never to return.
    O son! the night before thy wedding-day
    Hath Death lain with thy wife. There she lies,
    Flower as she was, deflowered by him.
    Death is my son-in-law, Death is my heir;
    My daughter he hath wedded: I will die,
    And leave him all; life, living, all is Death's.
  • Friar Laurence. Come, is the bride ready to go to church?

    Capulet. Ready to go, but never to return.
    O son! the night before thy wedding-day
    Hath Death lain with thy wife. There she lies,
    Flower as she was, deflowered by him.
    Death is my son-in-law, Death is my heir;
    My daughter he hath wedded: I will die,
    And leave him all; life, living, all is Death's.

46 IV, 5, 2718
  • Despised, distressed, hated, martyr'd, kill'd!
    Uncomfortable time, why cames...
  • Despised, distressed, hated, martyr'd, kill'd!
    Uncomfortable time, why camest thou now
    To murder, murder our solemnity?
    O child! O child! my soul, and not my child!
    Dead art thou! Alack! my child is dead;
    And with my child my joys are buried.
  • Paris. Beguiled, divorced, wronged, spited, slain!
    Most detestable death, by thee beguil'd,
    By cruel cruel thee quite overthrown!
    O love! O life! not life, but love in death!

    Capulet. Despised, distressed, hated, martyr'd, kill'd!
    Uncomfortable time, why camest thou now
    To murder, murder our solemnity?
    O child! O child! my soul, and not my child!
    Dead art thou! Alack! my child is dead;
    And with my child my joys are buried.

47 IV, 5, 2743
  • All things that we ordained festival,
    Turn from their office to black funera...
  • All things that we ordained festival,
    Turn from their office to black funeral;
    Our instruments to melancholy bells,
    Our wedding cheer to a sad burial feast,
    Our solemn hymns to sullen dirges change,
    Our bridal flowers serve for a buried corse,
    And all things change them to the contrary.
  • Friar Laurence. Peace, ho, for shame! confusion's cure lives not
    In these confusions. Heaven and yourself
    Had part in this fair maid; now heaven hath all,
    And all the better is it for the maid:
    Your part in her you could not keep from death,
    But heaven keeps his part in eternal life.
    The most you sought was her promotion;
    For 'twas your heaven she should be advanced:
    And weep ye now, seeing she is advanced
    Above the clouds, as high as heaven itself?
    O, in this love, you love your child so ill,
    That you run mad, seeing that she is well:
    She's not well married that lives married long;
    But she's best married that dies married young.
    Dry up your tears, and stick your rosemary
    On this fair corse; and, as the custom is,
    In all her best array bear her to church:
    For though fond nature bids us an lament,
    Yet nature's tears are reason's merriment.

    Capulet. All things that we ordained festival,
    Turn from their office to black funeral;
    Our instruments to melancholy bells,
    Our wedding cheer to a sad burial feast,
    Our solemn hymns to sullen dirges change,
    Our bridal flowers serve for a buried corse,
    And all things change them to the contrary.

48 V, 3, 3163
  • What should it be, that they so shriek abroad?
  • What should it be, that they so shriek abroad?
  • (stage directions). [Enter CAPULET, LADY CAPULET, and others]

    Capulet. What should it be, that they so shriek abroad?

49 V, 3, 3175
  • O heavens! O wife, look how our daughter bleeds!
    This dagger hath mista'en--...
  • O heavens! O wife, look how our daughter bleeds!
    This dagger hath mista'en--for, lo, his house
    Is empty on the back of Montague,--
    And it mis-sheathed in my daughter's bosom!
  • First Watchman. Here is a friar, and slaughter'd Romeo's man;
    With instruments upon them, fit to open
    These dead men's tombs.

    Capulet. O heavens! O wife, look how our daughter bleeds!
    This dagger hath mista'en--for, lo, his house
    Is empty on the back of Montague,--
    And it mis-sheathed in my daughter's bosom!

50 V, 3, 3271
  • O brother Montague, give me thy hand:
    This is my daughter's jointure, for no...
  • O brother Montague, give me thy hand:
    This is my daughter's jointure, for no more
    Can I demand.
  • Prince Escalus. This letter doth make good the friar's words,
    Their course of love, the tidings of her death:
    And here he writes that he did buy a poison
    Of a poor 'pothecary, and therewithal
    Came to this vault to die, and lie with Juliet.
    Where be these enemies? Capulet! Montague!
    See, what a scourge is laid upon your hate,
    That heaven finds means to kill your joys with love.
    And I for winking at your discords too
    Have lost a brace of kinsmen: all are punish'd.

    Capulet. O brother Montague, give me thy hand:
    This is my daughter's jointure, for no more
    Can I demand.

51 V, 3, 3279
  • As rich shall Romeo's by his lady's lie;
    Poor sacrifices of our enmity!
  • As rich shall Romeo's by his lady's lie;
    Poor sacrifices of our enmity!
  • Montague. But I can give thee more:
    For I will raise her statue in pure gold;
    That while Verona by that name is known,
    There shall no figure at such rate be set
    As that of true and faithful Juliet.

    Capulet. As rich shall Romeo's by his lady's lie;
    Poor sacrifices of our enmity!

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