Speeches (Lines) for Cassandra in "Troilus and Cressida"

Total: 13
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# Act, Scene, Line Speech text
1 II, 2, 1090
  • [Within] Cry, Trojans, cry!
  • [Within] Cry, Trojans, cry!
  • Troilus. I take to-day a wife, and my election
    Is led on in the conduct of my will;
    My will enkindled by mine eyes and ears,
    Two traded pilots 'twixt the dangerous shores
    Of will and judgment: how may I avoid,
    Although my will distaste what it elected,
    The wife I chose? there can be no evasion
    To blench from this and to stand firm by honour:
    We turn not back the silks upon the merchant,
    When we have soil'd them, nor the remainder viands
    We do not throw in unrespective sieve,
    Because we now are full. It was thought meet
    Paris should do some vengeance on the Greeks:
    Your breath of full consent bellied his sails;
    The seas and winds, old wranglers, took a truce
    And did him service: he touch'd the ports desired,
    And for an old aunt whom the Greeks held captive,
    He brought a Grecian queen, whose youth and freshness
    Wrinkles Apollo's, and makes stale the morning.
    Why keep we her? the Grecians keep our aunt:
    Is she worth keeping? why, she is a pearl,
    Whose price hath launch'd above a thousand ships,
    And turn'd crown'd kings to merchants.
    If you'll avouch 'twas wisdom Paris went--
    As you must needs, for you all cried 'Go, go,'--
    If you'll confess he brought home noble prize--
    As you must needs, for you all clapp'd your hands
    And cried 'Inestimable!'--why do you now
    The issue of your proper wisdoms rate,
    And do a deed that fortune never did,
    Beggar the estimation which you prized
    Richer than sea and land? O, theft most base,
    That we have stol'n what we do fear to keep!
    But, thieves, unworthy of a thing so stol'n,
    That in their country did them that disgrace,
    We fear to warrant in our native place!

    Cassandra. [Within] Cry, Trojans, cry!

2 II, 2, 1093
  • [Within] Cry, Trojans!
  • [Within] Cry, Trojans!
  • Troilus. 'Tis our mad sister, I do know her voice.

    Cassandra. [Within] Cry, Trojans!

3 II, 2, 1096
  • Cry, Trojans, cry! lend me ten thousand eyes,
    And I will fill them with prop...
  • Cry, Trojans, cry! lend me ten thousand eyes,
    And I will fill them with prophetic tears.
  • (stage directions). [Enter CASSANDRA, raving]

    Cassandra. Cry, Trojans, cry! lend me ten thousand eyes,
    And I will fill them with prophetic tears.

4 II, 2, 1099
  • Virgins and boys, mid-age and wrinkled eld,
    Soft infancy, that nothing canst...
  • Virgins and boys, mid-age and wrinkled eld,
    Soft infancy, that nothing canst but cry,
    Add to my clamours! let us pay betimes
    A moiety of that mass of moan to come.
    Cry, Trojans, cry! practise your eyes with tears!
    Troy must not be, nor goodly Ilion stand;
    Our firebrand brother, Paris, burns us all.
    Cry, Trojans, cry! a Helen and a woe:
    Cry, cry! Troy burns, or else let Helen go.
  • Hector. Peace, sister, peace!

    Cassandra. Virgins and boys, mid-age and wrinkled eld,
    Soft infancy, that nothing canst but cry,
    Add to my clamours! let us pay betimes
    A moiety of that mass of moan to come.
    Cry, Trojans, cry! practise your eyes with tears!
    Troy must not be, nor goodly Ilion stand;
    Our firebrand brother, Paris, burns us all.
    Cry, Trojans, cry! a Helen and a woe:
    Cry, cry! Troy burns, or else let Helen go.

5 V, 3, 3284
  • Where is my brother Hector?
  • Where is my brother Hector?
  • (stage directions). [Enter CASSANDRA]

    Cassandra. Where is my brother Hector?

6 V, 3, 3290
  • O, 'tis true.
  • O, 'tis true.
  • Andromache. Here, sister; arm'd, and bloody in intent.
    Consort with me in loud and dear petition,
    Pursue we him on knees; for I have dream'd
    Of bloody turbulence, and this whole night
    Hath nothing been but shapes and forms of slaughter.

    Cassandra. O, 'tis true.

7 V, 3, 3292
  • No notes of sally, for the heavens, sweet brother.
  • No notes of sally, for the heavens, sweet brother.
  • Hector. Ho! bid my trumpet sound!

    Cassandra. No notes of sally, for the heavens, sweet brother.

8 V, 3, 3294
  • The gods are deaf to hot and peevish vows:
    They are polluted offerings, more...
  • The gods are deaf to hot and peevish vows:
    They are polluted offerings, more abhorr'd
    Than spotted livers in the sacrifice.
  • Hector. Be gone, I say: the gods have heard me swear.

    Cassandra. The gods are deaf to hot and peevish vows:
    They are polluted offerings, more abhorr'd
    Than spotted livers in the sacrifice.

9 V, 3, 3301
  • It is the purpose that makes strong the vow;
    But vows to every purpose must...
  • It is the purpose that makes strong the vow;
    But vows to every purpose must not hold:
    Unarm, sweet Hector.
  • Andromache. O, be persuaded! do not count it holy
    To hurt by being just: it is as lawful,
    For we would give much, to use violent thefts,
    And rob in the behalf of charity.

    Cassandra. It is the purpose that makes strong the vow;
    But vows to every purpose must not hold:
    Unarm, sweet Hector.

10 V, 3, 3344
  • Lay hold upon him, Priam, hold him fast:
    He is thy crutch; now if thou lose...
  • Lay hold upon him, Priam, hold him fast:
    He is thy crutch; now if thou lose thy stay,
    Thou on him leaning, and all Troy on thee,
    Fall all together.
  • (stage directions). [Re-enter CASSANDRA, with PRIAM]

    Cassandra. Lay hold upon him, Priam, hold him fast:
    He is thy crutch; now if thou lose thy stay,
    Thou on him leaning, and all Troy on thee,
    Fall all together.

11 V, 3, 3364
  • O Priam, yield not to him!
  • O Priam, yield not to him!
  • Hector. I must not break my faith.
    You know me dutiful; therefore, dear sir,
    Let me not shame respect; but give me leave
    To take that course by your consent and voice,
    Which you do here forbid me, royal Priam.

    Cassandra. O Priam, yield not to him!

12 V, 3, 3371
  • O, farewell, dear Hector!
    Look, how thou diest! look, how thy eye turns pale...
  • O, farewell, dear Hector!
    Look, how thou diest! look, how thy eye turns pale!
    Look, how thy wounds do bleed at many vents!
    Hark, how Troy roars! how Hecuba cries out!
    How poor Andromache shrills her dolours forth!
    Behold, distraction, frenzy and amazement,
    Like witless antics, one another meet,
    And all cry, Hector! Hector's dead! O Hector!
  • Troilus. This foolish, dreaming, superstitious girl
    Makes all these bodements.

    Cassandra. O, farewell, dear Hector!
    Look, how thou diest! look, how thy eye turns pale!
    Look, how thy wounds do bleed at many vents!
    Hark, how Troy roars! how Hecuba cries out!
    How poor Andromache shrills her dolours forth!
    Behold, distraction, frenzy and amazement,
    Like witless antics, one another meet,
    And all cry, Hector! Hector's dead! O Hector!

13 V, 3, 3380
  • Farewell: yet, soft! Hector! take my leave:
    Thou dost thyself and all our Tr...
  • Farewell: yet, soft! Hector! take my leave:
    Thou dost thyself and all our Troy deceive.
  • Troilus. Away! away!

    Cassandra. Farewell: yet, soft! Hector! take my leave:
    Thou dost thyself and all our Troy deceive.

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