Speeches (Lines) for Claudius in "The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark"

Total: 102
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# Act, Scene, Line Speech text
1 I, 2, 201
  • Though yet of Hamlet our dear brother's death
    The memory be green, and that...
  • Though yet of Hamlet our dear brother's death
    The memory be green, and that it us befitted
    To bear our hearts in grief, and our whole kingdom
    To be contracted in one brow of woe,
    Yet so far hath discretion fought with nature
    That we with wisest sorrow think on him
    Together with remembrance of ourselves.
    Therefore our sometime sister, now our queen,
    Th' imperial jointress to this warlike state,
    Have we, as 'twere with a defeated joy,
    With an auspicious, and a dropping eye,
    With mirth in funeral, and with dirge in marriage,
    In equal scale weighing delight and dole,
    Taken to wife; nor have we herein barr'd
    Your better wisdoms, which have freely gone
    With this affair along. For all, our thanks.
    Now follows, that you know, young Fortinbras,
    Holding a weak supposal of our worth,
    Or thinking by our late dear brother's death
    Our state to be disjoint and out of frame,
    Colleagued with this dream of his advantage,
    He hath not fail'd to pester us with message
    Importing the surrender of those lands
    Lost by his father, with all bands of law,
    To our most valiant brother. So much for him.
    Now for ourself and for this time of meeting.
    Thus much the business is: we have here writ
    To Norway, uncle of young Fortinbras,
    Who, impotent and bedrid, scarcely hears
    Of this his nephew's purpose, to suppress
    His further gait herein, in that the levies,
    The lists, and full proportions are all made
    Out of his subject; and we here dispatch
    You, good Cornelius, and you, Voltemand,
    For bearers of this greeting to old Norway,
    Giving to you no further personal power
    To business with the King, more than the scope
    Of these dilated articles allow. [Gives a paper.]
    Farewell, and let your haste commend your duty.
  • (stage directions). Flourish. [Enter Claudius, King of Denmark, Gertrude the Queen, Hamlet, Polonius, Laertes and his sister Ophelia, [Voltemand, Cornelius,] Lords Attendant.

    Claudius. Though yet of Hamlet our dear brother's death
    The memory be green, and that it us befitted
    To bear our hearts in grief, and our whole kingdom
    To be contracted in one brow of woe,
    Yet so far hath discretion fought with nature
    That we with wisest sorrow think on him
    Together with remembrance of ourselves.
    Therefore our sometime sister, now our queen,
    Th' imperial jointress to this warlike state,
    Have we, as 'twere with a defeated joy,
    With an auspicious, and a dropping eye,
    With mirth in funeral, and with dirge in marriage,
    In equal scale weighing delight and dole,
    Taken to wife; nor have we herein barr'd
    Your better wisdoms, which have freely gone
    With this affair along. For all, our thanks.
    Now follows, that you know, young Fortinbras,
    Holding a weak supposal of our worth,
    Or thinking by our late dear brother's death
    Our state to be disjoint and out of frame,
    Colleagued with this dream of his advantage,
    He hath not fail'd to pester us with message
    Importing the surrender of those lands
    Lost by his father, with all bands of law,
    To our most valiant brother. So much for him.
    Now for ourself and for this time of meeting.
    Thus much the business is: we have here writ
    To Norway, uncle of young Fortinbras,
    Who, impotent and bedrid, scarcely hears
    Of this his nephew's purpose, to suppress
    His further gait herein, in that the levies,
    The lists, and full proportions are all made
    Out of his subject; and we here dispatch
    You, good Cornelius, and you, Voltemand,
    For bearers of this greeting to old Norway,
    Giving to you no further personal power
    To business with the King, more than the scope
    Of these dilated articles allow. [Gives a paper.]
    Farewell, and let your haste commend your duty.

2 I, 2, 241
  • We doubt it nothing. Heartily farewell.
    [Exeunt Voltemand and Cornelius.]
  • We doubt it nothing. Heartily farewell.
    [Exeunt Voltemand and Cornelius.]
    And now, Laertes, what's the news with you?
    You told us of some suit. What is't, Laertes?
    You cannot speak of reason to the Dane
    And lose your voice. What wouldst thou beg, Laertes,
    That shall not be my offer, not thy asking?
    The head is not more native to the heart,
    The hand more instrumental to the mouth,
    Than is the throne of Denmark to thy father.
    What wouldst thou have, Laertes?
  • Cornelius. [with Voltemand] In that, and all things, will we show our duty.

    Claudius. We doubt it nothing. Heartily farewell.
    [Exeunt Voltemand and Cornelius.]
    And now, Laertes, what's the news with you?
    You told us of some suit. What is't, Laertes?
    You cannot speak of reason to the Dane
    And lose your voice. What wouldst thou beg, Laertes,
    That shall not be my offer, not thy asking?
    The head is not more native to the heart,
    The hand more instrumental to the mouth,
    Than is the throne of Denmark to thy father.
    What wouldst thou have, Laertes?

3 I, 2, 259
  • Have you your father's leave? What says Polonius?
  • Have you your father's leave? What says Polonius?
  • Laertes. My dread lord,
    Your leave and favour to return to France;
    From whence though willingly I came to Denmark
    To show my duty in your coronation,
    Yet now I must confess, that duty done,
    My thoughts and wishes bend again toward France
    And bow them to your gracious leave and pardon.

    Claudius. Have you your father's leave? What says Polonius?

4 I, 2, 264
  • Take thy fair hour, Laertes. Time be thine,
    And thy best graces spend it at...
  • Take thy fair hour, Laertes. Time be thine,
    And thy best graces spend it at thy will!
    But now, my cousin Hamlet, and my son-
  • Polonius. He hath, my lord, wrung from me my slow leave
    By laboursome petition, and at last
    Upon his will I seal'd my hard consent.
    I do beseech you give him leave to go.

    Claudius. Take thy fair hour, Laertes. Time be thine,
    And thy best graces spend it at thy will!
    But now, my cousin Hamlet, and my son-

5 I, 2, 268
  • How is it that the clouds still hang on you?
  • How is it that the clouds still hang on you?
  • Hamlet. [aside] A little more than kin, and less than kind!

    Claudius. How is it that the clouds still hang on you?

6 I, 2, 290
  • 'Tis sweet and commendable in your nature, Hamlet,
    To give these mourning du...
  • 'Tis sweet and commendable in your nature, Hamlet,
    To give these mourning duties to your father;
    But you must know, your father lost a father;
    That father lost, lost his, and the survivor bound
    In filial obligation for some term
    To do obsequious sorrow. But to persever
    In obstinate condolement is a course
    Of impious stubbornness. 'Tis unmanly grief;
    It shows a will most incorrect to heaven,
    A heart unfortified, a mind impatient,
    An understanding simple and unschool'd;
    For what we know must be, and is as common
    As any the most vulgar thing to sense,
    Why should we in our peevish opposition
    Take it to heart? Fie! 'tis a fault to heaven,
    A fault against the dead, a fault to nature,
    To reason most absurd, whose common theme
    Is death of fathers, and who still hath cried,
    From the first corse till he that died to-day,
    'This must be so.' We pray you throw to earth
    This unprevailing woe, and think of us
    As of a father; for let the world take note
    You are the most immediate to our throne,
    And with no less nobility of love
    Than that which dearest father bears his son
    Do I impart toward you. For your intent
    In going back to school in Wittenberg,
    It is most retrograde to our desire;
    And we beseech you, bend you to remain
    Here in the cheer and comfort of our eye,
    Our chiefest courtier, cousin, and our son.
  • Hamlet. Seems, madam, Nay, it is. I know not 'seems.'
    'Tis not alone my inky cloak, good mother,
    Nor customary suits of solemn black,
    Nor windy suspiration of forc'd breath,
    No, nor the fruitful river in the eye,
    Nor the dejected havior of the visage,
    Together with all forms, moods, shapes of grief,
    'That can denote me truly. These indeed seem,
    For they are actions that a man might play;
    But I have that within which passeth show-
    These but the trappings and the suits of woe.

    Claudius. 'Tis sweet and commendable in your nature, Hamlet,
    To give these mourning duties to your father;
    But you must know, your father lost a father;
    That father lost, lost his, and the survivor bound
    In filial obligation for some term
    To do obsequious sorrow. But to persever
    In obstinate condolement is a course
    Of impious stubbornness. 'Tis unmanly grief;
    It shows a will most incorrect to heaven,
    A heart unfortified, a mind impatient,
    An understanding simple and unschool'd;
    For what we know must be, and is as common
    As any the most vulgar thing to sense,
    Why should we in our peevish opposition
    Take it to heart? Fie! 'tis a fault to heaven,
    A fault against the dead, a fault to nature,
    To reason most absurd, whose common theme
    Is death of fathers, and who still hath cried,
    From the first corse till he that died to-day,
    'This must be so.' We pray you throw to earth
    This unprevailing woe, and think of us
    As of a father; for let the world take note
    You are the most immediate to our throne,
    And with no less nobility of love
    Than that which dearest father bears his son
    Do I impart toward you. For your intent
    In going back to school in Wittenberg,
    It is most retrograde to our desire;
    And we beseech you, bend you to remain
    Here in the cheer and comfort of our eye,
    Our chiefest courtier, cousin, and our son.

7 I, 2, 324
  • Why, 'tis a loving and a fair reply.
    Be as ourself in Denmark. Madam, come....
  • Why, 'tis a loving and a fair reply.
    Be as ourself in Denmark. Madam, come.
    This gentle and unforc'd accord of Hamlet
    Sits smiling to my heart; in grace whereof,
    No jocund health that Denmark drinks to-day
    But the great cannon to the clouds shall tell,
    And the King's rouse the heaven shall bruit again,
    Respeaking earthly thunder. Come away.
  • Hamlet. I shall in all my best obey you, madam.

    Claudius. Why, 'tis a loving and a fair reply.
    Be as ourself in Denmark. Madam, come.
    This gentle and unforc'd accord of Hamlet
    Sits smiling to my heart; in grace whereof,
    No jocund health that Denmark drinks to-day
    But the great cannon to the clouds shall tell,
    And the King's rouse the heaven shall bruit again,
    Respeaking earthly thunder. Come away.

8 II, 2, 1084
  • Welcome, dear Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.
    Moreover that we much did long t...
  • Welcome, dear Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.
    Moreover that we much did long to see you,
    The need we have to use you did provoke
    Our hasty sending. Something have you heard
    Of Hamlet's transformation. So I call it,
    Sith nor th' exterior nor the inward man
    Resembles that it was. What it should be,
    More than his father's death, that thus hath put him
    So much from th' understanding of himself,
    I cannot dream of. I entreat you both
    That, being of so young days brought up with him,
    And since so neighbour'd to his youth and haviour,
    That you vouchsafe your rest here in our court
    Some little time; so by your companies
    To draw him on to pleasures, and to gather
    So much as from occasion you may glean,
    Whether aught to us unknown afflicts him thus
    That, open'd, lies within our remedy.
  • (stage directions). cum aliis.

    Claudius. Welcome, dear Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.
    Moreover that we much did long to see you,
    The need we have to use you did provoke
    Our hasty sending. Something have you heard
    Of Hamlet's transformation. So I call it,
    Sith nor th' exterior nor the inward man
    Resembles that it was. What it should be,
    More than his father's death, that thus hath put him
    So much from th' understanding of himself,
    I cannot dream of. I entreat you both
    That, being of so young days brought up with him,
    And since so neighbour'd to his youth and haviour,
    That you vouchsafe your rest here in our court
    Some little time; so by your companies
    To draw him on to pleasures, and to gather
    So much as from occasion you may glean,
    Whether aught to us unknown afflicts him thus
    That, open'd, lies within our remedy.

9 II, 2, 1118
  • Thanks, Rosencrantz and gentle Guildenstern.
  • Thanks, Rosencrantz and gentle Guildenstern.
  • Guildenstern. But we both obey,
    And here give up ourselves, in the full bent,
    To lay our service freely at your feet,
    To be commanded.

    Claudius. Thanks, Rosencrantz and gentle Guildenstern.

10 II, 2, 1130
  • Thou still hast been the father of good news.
  • Thou still hast been the father of good news.
  • Polonius. Th' ambassadors from Norway, my good lord,
    Are joyfully return'd.

    Claudius. Thou still hast been the father of good news.

11 II, 2, 1138
  • O, speak of that! That do I long to hear.
  • O, speak of that! That do I long to hear.
  • Polonius. Have I, my lord? Assure you, my good liege,
    I hold my duty as I hold my soul,
    Both to my God and to my gracious king;
    And I do think- or else this brain of mine
    Hunts not the trail of policy so sure
    As it hath us'd to do- that I have found
    The very cause of Hamlet's lunacy.

    Claudius. O, speak of that! That do I long to hear.

12 II, 2, 1141
  • Thyself do grace to them, and bring them in.
    [Exit Polonius.]
    He tells m...
  • Thyself do grace to them, and bring them in.
    [Exit Polonius.]
    He tells me, my dear Gertrude, he hath found
    The head and source of all your son's distemper.
  • Polonius. Give first admittance to th' ambassadors.
    My news shall be the fruit to that great feast.

    Claudius. Thyself do grace to them, and bring them in.
    [Exit Polonius.]
    He tells me, my dear Gertrude, he hath found
    The head and source of all your son's distemper.

13 II, 2, 1147
  • Well, we shall sift him.
    [Enter Polonius, Voltemand, and Cornelius.]
    Wel...
  • Well, we shall sift him.
    [Enter Polonius, Voltemand, and Cornelius.]
    Welcome, my good friends.
    Say, Voltemand, what from our brother Norway?
  • Gertrude. I doubt it is no other but the main,
    His father's death and our o'erhasty marriage.

    Claudius. Well, we shall sift him.
    [Enter Polonius, Voltemand, and Cornelius.]
    Welcome, my good friends.
    Say, Voltemand, what from our brother Norway?

14 II, 2, 1173
  • It likes us well;
    And at our more consider'd time we'll read,
    Answer, a...
  • It likes us well;
    And at our more consider'd time we'll read,
    Answer, and think upon this business.
    Meantime we thank you for your well-took labour.
    Go to your rest; at night we'll feast together.
    Most welcome home! Exeunt Ambassadors.
  • Voltemand. Most fair return of greetings and desires.
    Upon our first, he sent out to suppress
    His nephew's levies; which to him appear'd
    To be a preparation 'gainst the Polack,
    But better look'd into, he truly found
    It was against your Highness; whereat griev'd,
    That so his sickness, age, and impotence
    Was falsely borne in hand, sends out arrests
    On Fortinbras; which he, in brief, obeys,
    Receives rebuke from Norway, and, in fine,
    Makes vow before his uncle never more
    To give th' assay of arms against your Majesty.
    Whereon old Norway, overcome with joy,
    Gives him three thousand crowns in annual fee
    And his commission to employ those soldiers,
    So levied as before, against the Polack;
    With an entreaty, herein further shown,
    [Gives a paper.]
    That it might please you to give quiet pass
    Through your dominions for this enterprise,
    On such regards of safety and allowance
    As therein are set down.

    Claudius. It likes us well;
    And at our more consider'd time we'll read,
    Answer, and think upon this business.
    Meantime we thank you for your well-took labour.
    Go to your rest; at night we'll feast together.
    Most welcome home! Exeunt Ambassadors.

15 II, 2, 1225
  • But how hath she
    Receiv'd his love?
  • But how hath she
    Receiv'd his love?
  • Polonius. Good madam, stay awhile. I will be faithful. [Reads.]
    'Doubt thou the stars are fire;
    Doubt that the sun doth move;
    Doubt truth to be a liar;
    But never doubt I love.
    'O dear Ophelia, I am ill at these numbers; I have not art to
    reckon my groans; but that I love thee best, O most best, believe
    it. Adieu.
    'Thine evermore, most dear lady, whilst this machine is to
    him, HAMLET.'
    This, in obedience, hath my daughter shown me;
    And more above, hath his solicitings,
    As they fell out by time, by means, and place,
    All given to mine ear.

    Claudius. But how hath she
    Receiv'd his love?

16 II, 2, 1228
  • As of a man faithful and honourable.
  • As of a man faithful and honourable.
  • Polonius. What do you think of me?

    Claudius. As of a man faithful and honourable.

17 II, 2, 1250
  • Do you think 'tis this?
  • Do you think 'tis this?
  • Polonius. I would fain prove so. But what might you think,
    When I had seen this hot love on the wing
    (As I perceiv'd it, I must tell you that,
    Before my daughter told me), what might you,
    Or my dear Majesty your queen here, think,
    If I had play'd the desk or table book,
    Or given my heart a winking, mute and dumb,
    Or look'd upon this love with idle sight?
    What might you think? No, I went round to work
    And my young mistress thus I did bespeak:
    'Lord Hamlet is a prince, out of thy star.
    This must not be.' And then I prescripts gave her,
    That she should lock herself from his resort,
    Admit no messengers, receive no tokens.
    Which done, she took the fruits of my advice,
    And he, repulsed, a short tale to make,
    Fell into a sadness, then into a fast,
    Thence to a watch, thence into a weakness,
    Thence to a lightness, and, by this declension,
    Into the madness wherein now he raves,
    And all we mourn for.

    Claudius. Do you think 'tis this?

18 II, 2, 1255
  • Not that I know.
  • Not that I know.
  • Polonius. Hath there been such a time- I would fain know that-
    That I have Positively said 'Tis so,'
    When it prov'd otherwise.?

    Claudius. Not that I know.

19 II, 2, 1260
  • How may we try it further?
  • How may we try it further?
  • Polonius. [points to his head and shoulder] Take this from this, if this be otherwise.
    If circumstances lead me, I will find
    Where truth is hid, though it were hid indeed
    Within the centre.

    Claudius. How may we try it further?

20 II, 2, 1270
  • We will try it.
  • We will try it.
  • Polonius. At such a time I'll loose my daughter to him.
    Be you and I behind an arras then.
    Mark the encounter. If he love her not,
    And he not from his reason fall'n thereon
    Let me be no assistant for a state,
    But keep a farm and carters.

    Claudius. We will try it.

21 III, 1, 1683
  • And can you by no drift of circumstance
    Get from him why he puts on this con...
  • And can you by no drift of circumstance
    Get from him why he puts on this confusion,
    Grating so harshly all his days of quiet
    With turbulent and dangerous lunacy?
  • (stage directions). and Lords.

    Claudius. And can you by no drift of circumstance
    Get from him why he puts on this confusion,
    Grating so harshly all his days of quiet
    With turbulent and dangerous lunacy?

22 III, 1, 1709
  • With all my heart, and it doth much content me
    To hear him so inclin'd.
    ...
  • With all my heart, and it doth much content me
    To hear him so inclin'd.
    Good gentlemen, give him a further edge
    And drive his purpose on to these delights.
  • Polonius. 'Tis most true;
    And he beseech'd me to entreat your Majesties
    To hear and see the matter.

    Claudius. With all my heart, and it doth much content me
    To hear him so inclin'd.
    Good gentlemen, give him a further edge
    And drive his purpose on to these delights.

23 III, 1, 1715
  • Sweet Gertrude, leave us too;
    For we have closely sent for Hamlet hither,
  • Sweet Gertrude, leave us too;
    For we have closely sent for Hamlet hither,
    That he, as 'twere by accident, may here
    Affront Ophelia.
    Her father and myself (lawful espials)
    Will so bestow ourselves that, seeing unseen,
    We may of their encounter frankly judge
    And gather by him, as he is behav'd,
    If't be th' affliction of his love, or no,
    That thus he suffers for.
  • (stage directions). Exeunt Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.

    Claudius. Sweet Gertrude, leave us too;
    For we have closely sent for Hamlet hither,
    That he, as 'twere by accident, may here
    Affront Ophelia.
    Her father and myself (lawful espials)
    Will so bestow ourselves that, seeing unseen,
    We may of their encounter frankly judge
    And gather by him, as he is behav'd,
    If't be th' affliction of his love, or no,
    That thus he suffers for.

24 III, 1, 1740
  • [aside] O, 'tis too true!
    How smart a lash that speech doth give my conscien...
  • [aside] O, 'tis too true!
    How smart a lash that speech doth give my conscience!
    The harlot's cheek, beautied with plast'ring art,
    Is not more ugly to the thing that helps it
    Than is my deed to my most painted word.
    O heavy burthen!
  • Polonius. Ophelia, walk you here.- Gracious, so please you,
    We will bestow ourselves.- [To Ophelia] Read on this book,
    That show of such an exercise may colour
    Your loneliness.- We are oft to blame in this,
    'Tis too much prov'd, that with devotion's visage
    And pious action we do sugar o'er
    The Devil himself.

    Claudius. [aside] O, 'tis too true!
    How smart a lash that speech doth give my conscience!
    The harlot's cheek, beautied with plast'ring art,
    Is not more ugly to the thing that helps it
    Than is my deed to my most painted word.
    O heavy burthen!

25 III, 1, 1854
  • Love? his affections do not that way tend;
    Nor what he spake, though it lac...
  • Love? his affections do not that way tend;
    Nor what he spake, though it lack'd form a little,
    Was not like madness. There's something in his soul
    O'er which his melancholy sits on brood;
    And I do doubt the hatch and the disclose
    Will be some danger; which for to prevent,
    I have in quick determination
    Thus set it down: he shall with speed to England
    For the demand of our neglected tribute.
    Haply the seas, and countries different,
    With variable objects, shall expel
    This something-settled matter in his heart,
    Whereon his brains still beating puts him thus
    From fashion of himself. What think you on't?
  • (stage directions). Enter King and Polonius.

    Claudius. Love? his affections do not that way tend;
    Nor what he spake, though it lack'd form a little,
    Was not like madness. There's something in his soul
    O'er which his melancholy sits on brood;
    And I do doubt the hatch and the disclose
    Will be some danger; which for to prevent,
    I have in quick determination
    Thus set it down: he shall with speed to England
    For the demand of our neglected tribute.
    Haply the seas, and countries different,
    With variable objects, shall expel
    This something-settled matter in his heart,
    Whereon his brains still beating puts him thus
    From fashion of himself. What think you on't?

26 III, 1, 1880
  • It shall be so.
    Madness in great ones must not unwatch'd go. Exeunt.
  • It shall be so.
    Madness in great ones must not unwatch'd go. Exeunt.
  • Polonius. It shall do well. But yet do I believe
    The origin and commencement of his grief
    Sprung from neglected love.- How now, Ophelia?
    You need not tell us what Lord Hamlet said.
    We heard it all.- My lord, do as you please;
    But if you hold it fit, after the play
    Let his queen mother all alone entreat him
    To show his grief. Let her be round with him;
    And I'll be plac'd so please you, in the ear
    Of all their conference. If she find him not,
    To England send him; or confine him where
    Your wisdom best shall think.

    Claudius. It shall be so.
    Madness in great ones must not unwatch'd go. Exeunt.

27 III, 2, 1975
  • How fares our cousin Hamlet?
  • How fares our cousin Hamlet?
  • Hamlet. They are coming to the play. I must be idle.
    Get you a place.

    Claudius. How fares our cousin Hamlet?

28 III, 2, 1978
  • I have nothing with this answer, Hamlet. These words are not
    mine.
  • I have nothing with this answer, Hamlet. These words are not
    mine.
  • Hamlet. Excellent, i' faith; of the chameleon's dish. I eat the air,
    promise-cramm'd. You cannot feed capons so.

    Claudius. I have nothing with this answer, Hamlet. These words are not
    mine.

29 III, 2, 2127
  • Have you heard the argument? Is there no offence in't?
  • Have you heard the argument? Is there no offence in't?
  • Hamlet. O, but she'll keep her word.

    Claudius. Have you heard the argument? Is there no offence in't?

30 III, 2, 2130
  • What do you call the play?
  • What do you call the play?
  • Hamlet. No, no! They do but jest, poison in jest; no offence i' th'
    world.

    Claudius. What do you call the play?

31 III, 2, 2156
  • Give me some light! Away!
  • Give me some light! Away!
  • Polonius. Give o'er the play.

    Claudius. Give me some light! Away!

32 III, 3, 2277
  • I like him not, nor stands it safe with us
    To let his madness range. Therefo...
  • I like him not, nor stands it safe with us
    To let his madness range. Therefore prepare you;
    I your commission will forthwith dispatch,
    And he to England shall along with you.
    The terms of our estate may not endure
    Hazard so near us as doth hourly grow
    Out of his lunacies.
  • (stage directions). Enter King, Rosencrantz, and Guildenstern.

    Claudius. I like him not, nor stands it safe with us
    To let his madness range. Therefore prepare you;
    I your commission will forthwith dispatch,
    And he to England shall along with you.
    The terms of our estate may not endure
    Hazard so near us as doth hourly grow
    Out of his lunacies.

33 III, 3, 2301
  • Arm you, I pray you, to this speedy voyage;
    For we will fetters put upon thi...
  • Arm you, I pray you, to this speedy voyage;
    For we will fetters put upon this fear,
    Which now goes too free-footed.
  • Rosencrantz. The single and peculiar life is bound
    With all the strength and armour of the mind
    To keep itself from noyance; but much more
    That spirit upon whose weal depends and rests
    The lives of many. The cesse of majesty
    Dies not alone, but like a gulf doth draw
    What's near it with it. It is a massy wheel,
    Fix'd on the summit of the highest mount,
    To whose huge spokes ten thousand lesser things
    Are mortis'd and adjoin'd; which when it falls,
    Each small annexment, petty consequence,
    Attends the boist'rous ruin. Never alone
    Did the king sigh, but with a general groan.

    Claudius. Arm you, I pray you, to this speedy voyage;
    For we will fetters put upon this fear,
    Which now goes too free-footed.

34 III, 3, 2316
  • Thanks, dear my lord.
    [Exit [Polonius].]
    O, my offence is rank, it smell...
  • Thanks, dear my lord.
    [Exit [Polonius].]
    O, my offence is rank, it smells to heaven;
    It hath the primal eldest curse upon't,
    A brother's murther! Pray can I not,
    Though inclination be as sharp as will.
    My stronger guilt defeats my strong intent,
    And, like a man to double business bound,
    I stand in pause where I shall first begin,
    And both neglect. What if this cursed hand
    Were thicker than itself with brother's blood,
    Is there not rain enough in the sweet heavens
    To wash it white as snow? Whereto serves mercy
    But to confront the visage of offence?
    And what's in prayer but this twofold force,
    To be forestalled ere we come to fall,
    Or pardon'd being down? Then I'll look up;
    My fault is past. But, O, what form of prayer
    Can serve my turn? 'Forgive me my foul murther'?
    That cannot be; since I am still possess'd
    Of those effects for which I did the murther-
    My crown, mine own ambition, and my queen.
    May one be pardon'd and retain th' offence?
    In the corrupted currents of this world
    Offence's gilded hand may shove by justice,
    And oft 'tis seen the wicked prize itself
    Buys out the law; but 'tis not so above.
    There is no shuffling; there the action lies
    In his true nature, and we ourselves compell'd,
    Even to the teeth and forehead of our faults,
    To give in evidence. What then? What rests?
    Try what repentance can. What can it not?
    Yet what can it when one cannot repent?
    O wretched state! O bosom black as death!
    O limed soul, that, struggling to be free,
    Art more engag'd! Help, angels! Make assay.
    Bow, stubborn knees; and heart with strings of steel,
    Be soft as sinews of the new-born babe!
    All may be well. He kneels.
  • Polonius. My lord, he's going to his mother's closet.
    Behind the arras I'll convey myself
    To hear the process. I'll warrant she'll tax him home;
    And, as you said, and wisely was it said,
    'Tis meet that some more audience than a mother,
    Since nature makes them partial, should o'erhear
    The speech, of vantage. Fare you well, my liege.
    I'll call upon you ere you go to bed
    And tell you what I know.

    Claudius. Thanks, dear my lord.
    [Exit [Polonius].]
    O, my offence is rank, it smells to heaven;
    It hath the primal eldest curse upon't,
    A brother's murther! Pray can I not,
    Though inclination be as sharp as will.
    My stronger guilt defeats my strong intent,
    And, like a man to double business bound,
    I stand in pause where I shall first begin,
    And both neglect. What if this cursed hand
    Were thicker than itself with brother's blood,
    Is there not rain enough in the sweet heavens
    To wash it white as snow? Whereto serves mercy
    But to confront the visage of offence?
    And what's in prayer but this twofold force,
    To be forestalled ere we come to fall,
    Or pardon'd being down? Then I'll look up;
    My fault is past. But, O, what form of prayer
    Can serve my turn? 'Forgive me my foul murther'?
    That cannot be; since I am still possess'd
    Of those effects for which I did the murther-
    My crown, mine own ambition, and my queen.
    May one be pardon'd and retain th' offence?
    In the corrupted currents of this world
    Offence's gilded hand may shove by justice,
    And oft 'tis seen the wicked prize itself
    Buys out the law; but 'tis not so above.
    There is no shuffling; there the action lies
    In his true nature, and we ourselves compell'd,
    Even to the teeth and forehead of our faults,
    To give in evidence. What then? What rests?
    Try what repentance can. What can it not?
    Yet what can it when one cannot repent?
    O wretched state! O bosom black as death!
    O limed soul, that, struggling to be free,
    Art more engag'd! Help, angels! Make assay.
    Bow, stubborn knees; and heart with strings of steel,
    Be soft as sinews of the new-born babe!
    All may be well. He kneels.

35 III, 3, 2380
  • [rises] My words fly up, my thoughts remain below.
    Words without thoughts ne...
  • [rises] My words fly up, my thoughts remain below.
    Words without thoughts never to heaven go. Exit.
  • Hamlet. Now might I do it pat, now he is praying;
    And now I'll do't. And so he goes to heaven,
    And so am I reveng'd. That would be scann'd.
    A villain kills my father; and for that,
    I, his sole son, do this same villain send
    To heaven.
    Why, this is hire and salary, not revenge!
    He took my father grossly, full of bread,
    With all his crimes broad blown, as flush as May;
    And how his audit stands, who knows save heaven?
    But in our circumstance and course of thought,
    'Tis heavy with him; and am I then reveng'd,
    To take him in the purging of his soul,
    When he is fit and seasoned for his passage?
    No.
    Up, sword, and know thou a more horrid hent.
    When he is drunk asleep; or in his rage;
    Or in th' incestuous pleasure of his bed;
    At gaming, swearing, or about some act
    That has no relish of salvation in't-
    Then trip him, that his heels may kick at heaven,
    And that his soul may be as damn'd and black
    As hell, whereto it goes. My mother stays.
    This physic but prolongs thy sickly days. Exit.

    Claudius. [rises] My words fly up, my thoughts remain below.
    Words without thoughts never to heaven go. Exit.

36 IV, 1, 2626
  • There's matter in these sighs. These profound heaves
    You must translate; 'ti...
  • There's matter in these sighs. These profound heaves
    You must translate; 'tis fit we understand them.
    Where is your son?
  • (stage directions). Enter King and Queen, with Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.

    Claudius. There's matter in these sighs. These profound heaves
    You must translate; 'tis fit we understand them.
    Where is your son?

37 IV, 1, 2632
  • What, Gertrude? How does Hamlet?
  • What, Gertrude? How does Hamlet?
  • Gertrude. Bestow this place on us a little while.
    [Exeunt Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.]
    Ah, mine own lord, what have I seen to-night!

    Claudius. What, Gertrude? How does Hamlet?

38 IV, 1, 2639
  • O heavy deed!
    It had been so with us, had we been there.
    His liberty is...
  • O heavy deed!
    It had been so with us, had we been there.
    His liberty is full of threats to all-
    To you yourself, to us, to every one.
    Alas, how shall this bloody deed be answer'd?
    It will be laid to us, whose providence
    Should have kept short, restrain'd, and out of haunt
    This mad young man. But so much was our love
    We would not understand what was most fit,
    But, like the owner of a foul disease,
    To keep it from divulging, let it feed
    Even on the pith of life. Where is he gone?
  • Gertrude. Mad as the sea and wind when both contend
    Which is the mightier. In his lawless fit
    Behind the arras hearing something stir,
    Whips out his rapier, cries 'A rat, a rat!'
    And in this brainish apprehension kills
    The unseen good old man.

    Claudius. O heavy deed!
    It had been so with us, had we been there.
    His liberty is full of threats to all-
    To you yourself, to us, to every one.
    Alas, how shall this bloody deed be answer'd?
    It will be laid to us, whose providence
    Should have kept short, restrain'd, and out of haunt
    This mad young man. But so much was our love
    We would not understand what was most fit,
    But, like the owner of a foul disease,
    To keep it from divulging, let it feed
    Even on the pith of life. Where is he gone?

39 IV, 1, 2655
  • O Gertrude, come away!
    The sun no sooner shall the mountains touch
    But w...
  • O Gertrude, come away!
    The sun no sooner shall the mountains touch
    But we will ship him hence; and this vile deed
    We must with all our majesty and skill
    Both countenance and excuse. Ho, Guildenstern!
    [Enter Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.]
    Friends both, go join you with some further aid.
    Hamlet in madness hath Polonius slain,
    And from his mother's closet hath he dragg'd him.
    Go seek him out; speak fair, and bring the body
    Into the chapel. I pray you haste in this.
    [Exeunt [Rosencrantz and Guildenstern].]
    Come, Gertrude, we'll call up our wisest friends
    And let them know both what we mean to do
    And what's untimely done. [So haply slander-]
    Whose whisper o'er the world's diameter,
    As level as the cannon to his blank,
    Transports his poisoned shot- may miss our name
    And hit the woundless air.- O, come away!
    My soul is full of discord and dismay.
  • Gertrude. To draw apart the body he hath kill'd;
    O'er whom his very madness, like some ore
    Among a mineral of metals base,
    Shows itself pure. He weeps for what is done.

    Claudius. O Gertrude, come away!
    The sun no sooner shall the mountains touch
    But we will ship him hence; and this vile deed
    We must with all our majesty and skill
    Both countenance and excuse. Ho, Guildenstern!
    [Enter Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.]
    Friends both, go join you with some further aid.
    Hamlet in madness hath Polonius slain,
    And from his mother's closet hath he dragg'd him.
    Go seek him out; speak fair, and bring the body
    Into the chapel. I pray you haste in this.
    [Exeunt [Rosencrantz and Guildenstern].]
    Come, Gertrude, we'll call up our wisest friends
    And let them know both what we mean to do
    And what's untimely done. [So haply slander-]
    Whose whisper o'er the world's diameter,
    As level as the cannon to his blank,
    Transports his poisoned shot- may miss our name
    And hit the woundless air.- O, come away!
    My soul is full of discord and dismay.

40 IV, 3, 2708
  • I have sent to seek him and to find the body.
    How dangerous is it that this...
  • I have sent to seek him and to find the body.
    How dangerous is it that this man goes loose!
    Yet must not we put the strong law on him.
    He's lov'd of the distracted multitude,
    Who like not in their judgment, but their eyes;
    And where 'tis so, th' offender's scourge is weigh'd,
    But never the offence. To bear all smooth and even,
    This sudden sending him away must seem
    Deliberate pause. Diseases desperate grown
    By desperate appliance are reliev'd,
    Or not at all.
    [Enter Rosencrantz.]
    How now O What hath befall'n?
  • (stage directions). Enter King.

    Claudius. I have sent to seek him and to find the body.
    How dangerous is it that this man goes loose!
    Yet must not we put the strong law on him.
    He's lov'd of the distracted multitude,
    Who like not in their judgment, but their eyes;
    And where 'tis so, th' offender's scourge is weigh'd,
    But never the offence. To bear all smooth and even,
    This sudden sending him away must seem
    Deliberate pause. Diseases desperate grown
    By desperate appliance are reliev'd,
    Or not at all.
    [Enter Rosencrantz.]
    How now O What hath befall'n?

41 IV, 3, 2723
  • But where is he?
  • But where is he?
  • Rosencrantz. Where the dead body is bestow'd, my lord,
    We cannot get from him.

    Claudius. But where is he?

42 IV, 3, 2725
  • Bring him before us.
  • Bring him before us.
  • Rosencrantz. Without, my lord; guarded, to know your pleasure.

    Claudius. Bring him before us.

43 IV, 3, 2728
  • Now, Hamlet, where's Polonius?
  • Now, Hamlet, where's Polonius?
  • (stage directions). Enter Hamlet and Guildenstern [with Attendants].

    Claudius. Now, Hamlet, where's Polonius?

44 IV, 3, 2730
  • At supper? Where?
  • At supper? Where?
  • Hamlet. At supper.

    Claudius. At supper? Where?

45 IV, 3, 2737
  • Alas, alas!
  • Alas, alas!
  • Hamlet. Not where he eats, but where he is eaten. A certain
    convocation of politic worms are e'en at him. Your worm is your
    only emperor for diet. We fat all creatures else to fat us, and
    we fat ourselves for maggots. Your fat king and your lean beggar
    is but variable service- two dishes, but to one table. That's the
    end.

    Claudius. Alas, alas!

46 IV, 3, 2740
  • What dost thou mean by this?
  • What dost thou mean by this?
  • Hamlet. A man may fish with the worm that hath eat of a king, and eat
    of the fish that hath fed of that worm.

    Claudius. What dost thou mean by this?

47 IV, 3, 2743
  • Where is Polonius?
  • Where is Polonius?
  • Hamlet. Nothing but to show you how a king may go a progress through
    the guts of a beggar.

    Claudius. Where is Polonius?

48 IV, 3, 2748
  • Go seek him there. [To Attendants.]
  • Go seek him there. [To Attendants.]
  • Hamlet. In heaven. Send thither to see. If your messenger find him not
    there, seek him i' th' other place yourself. But indeed, if you
    find him not within this month, you shall nose him as you go up
    the stair, into the lobby.

    Claudius. Go seek him there. [To Attendants.]

49 IV, 3, 2751
  • Hamlet, this deed, for thine especial safety,-
    Which we do tender as we dear...
  • Hamlet, this deed, for thine especial safety,-
    Which we do tender as we dearly grieve
    For that which thou hast done,- must send thee hence
    With fiery quickness. Therefore prepare thyself.
    The bark is ready and the wind at help,
    Th' associates tend, and everything is bent
    For England.
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt Attendants.]

    Claudius. Hamlet, this deed, for thine especial safety,-
    Which we do tender as we dearly grieve
    For that which thou hast done,- must send thee hence
    With fiery quickness. Therefore prepare thyself.
    The bark is ready and the wind at help,
    Th' associates tend, and everything is bent
    For England.

50 IV, 3, 2759
  • Ay, Hamlet.
  • Ay, Hamlet.
  • Hamlet. For England?

    Claudius. Ay, Hamlet.

51 IV, 3, 2761
  • So is it, if thou knew'st our purposes.
  • So is it, if thou knew'st our purposes.
  • Hamlet. Good.

    Claudius. So is it, if thou knew'st our purposes.

52 IV, 3, 2764
  • Thy loving father, Hamlet.
  • Thy loving father, Hamlet.
  • Hamlet. I see a cherub that sees them. But come, for England!
    Farewell, dear mother.

    Claudius. Thy loving father, Hamlet.

53 IV, 3, 2768
  • Follow him at foot; tempt him with speed aboard.
    Delay it not; I'll have him...
  • Follow him at foot; tempt him with speed aboard.
    Delay it not; I'll have him hence to-night.
    Away! for everything is seal'd and done
    That else leans on th' affair. Pray you make haste.
    [Exeunt Rosencrantz and Guildenstern]
    And, England, if my love thou hold'st at aught,-
    As my great power thereof may give thee sense,
    Since yet thy cicatrice looks raw and red
    After the Danish sword, and thy free awe
    Pays homage to us,- thou mayst not coldly set
    Our sovereign process, which imports at full,
    By letters congruing to that effect,
    The present death of Hamlet. Do it, England;
    For like the hectic in my blood he rages,
    And thou must cure me. Till I know 'tis done,
    Howe'er my haps, my joys were ne'er begun. Exit.
  • (stage directions). Exit.

    Claudius. Follow him at foot; tempt him with speed aboard.
    Delay it not; I'll have him hence to-night.
    Away! for everything is seal'd and done
    That else leans on th' affair. Pray you make haste.
    [Exeunt Rosencrantz and Guildenstern]
    And, England, if my love thou hold'st at aught,-
    As my great power thereof may give thee sense,
    Since yet thy cicatrice looks raw and red
    After the Danish sword, and thy free awe
    Pays homage to us,- thou mayst not coldly set
    Our sovereign process, which imports at full,
    By letters congruing to that effect,
    The present death of Hamlet. Do it, England;
    For like the hectic in my blood he rages,
    And thou must cure me. Till I know 'tis done,
    Howe'er my haps, my joys were ne'er begun. Exit.

54 IV, 5, 2903
  • How do you, pretty lady?
  • How do you, pretty lady?
  • Ophelia. [Sings]
    Larded all with sweet flowers;
    Which bewept to the grave did not go
    With true-love showers.

    Claudius. How do you, pretty lady?

55 IV, 5, 2907
  • Conceit upon her father.
  • Conceit upon her father.
  • Ophelia. Well, God dild you! They say the owl was a baker's daughter.
    Lord, we know what we are, but know not what we may be. God be at
    your table!

    Claudius. Conceit upon her father.

56 IV, 5, 2918
  • Pretty Ophelia!
  • Pretty Ophelia!
  • Ophelia. Pray let's have no words of this; but when they ask, you what
    it means, say you this:
    (Sings) To-morrow is Saint Valentine's day,
    All in the morning bedtime,
    And I a maid at your window,
    To be your Valentine.
    Then up he rose and donn'd his clo'es
    And dupp'd the chamber door,
    Let in the maid, that out a maid
    Never departed more.

    Claudius. Pretty Ophelia!

57 IV, 5, 2929
  • How long hath she been thus?
  • How long hath she been thus?
  • Ophelia. Indeed, la, without an oath, I'll make an end on't!
    [Sings] By Gis and by Saint Charity,
    Alack, and fie for shame!
    Young men will do't if they come to't
    By Cock, they are to blame.
    Quoth she, 'Before you tumbled me,
    You promis'd me to wed.'
    He answers:
    'So would I 'a' done, by yonder sun,
    An thou hadst not come to my bed.'

    Claudius. How long hath she been thus?

58 IV, 5, 2935
  • Follow her close; give her good watch, I pray you.
    [Exit Horatio.]
    O, th...
  • Follow her close; give her good watch, I pray you.
    [Exit Horatio.]
    O, this is the poison of deep grief; it springs
    All from her father's death. O Gertrude, Gertrude,
    When sorrows come, they come not single spies.
    But in battalions! First, her father slain;
    Next, your son gone, and he most violent author
    Of his own just remove; the people muddied,
    Thick and and unwholesome in their thoughts and whispers
    For good Polonius' death, and we have done but greenly
    In hugger-mugger to inter him; poor Ophelia
    Divided from herself and her fair judgment,
    Without the which we are pictures or mere beasts;
    Last, and as much containing as all these,
    Her brother is in secret come from France;
    Feeds on his wonder, keeps, himself in clouds,
    And wants not buzzers to infect his ear
    With pestilent speeches of his father's death,
    Wherein necessity, of matter beggar'd,
    Will nothing stick our person to arraign
    In ear and ear. O my dear Gertrude, this,
    Like to a murd'ring piece, in many places
    Give me superfluous death. A noise within.
  • Ophelia. I hope all will be well. We must be patient; but I cannot
    choose but weep to think they would lay him i' th' cold ground.
    My brother shall know of it; and so I thank you for your good
    counsel. Come, my coach! Good night, ladies. Good night, sweet
    ladies. Good night, good night. Exit

    Claudius. Follow her close; give her good watch, I pray you.
    [Exit Horatio.]
    O, this is the poison of deep grief; it springs
    All from her father's death. O Gertrude, Gertrude,
    When sorrows come, they come not single spies.
    But in battalions! First, her father slain;
    Next, your son gone, and he most violent author
    Of his own just remove; the people muddied,
    Thick and and unwholesome in their thoughts and whispers
    For good Polonius' death, and we have done but greenly
    In hugger-mugger to inter him; poor Ophelia
    Divided from herself and her fair judgment,
    Without the which we are pictures or mere beasts;
    Last, and as much containing as all these,
    Her brother is in secret come from France;
    Feeds on his wonder, keeps, himself in clouds,
    And wants not buzzers to infect his ear
    With pestilent speeches of his father's death,
    Wherein necessity, of matter beggar'd,
    Will nothing stick our person to arraign
    In ear and ear. O my dear Gertrude, this,
    Like to a murd'ring piece, in many places
    Give me superfluous death. A noise within.

59 IV, 5, 2959
  • Where are my Switzers? Let them guard the door.
    [Enter a Messenger.]
    Wha...
  • Where are my Switzers? Let them guard the door.
    [Enter a Messenger.]
    What is the matter?
  • Gertrude. Alack, what noise is this?

    Claudius. Where are my Switzers? Let them guard the door.
    [Enter a Messenger.]
    What is the matter?

60 IV, 5, 2976
  • The doors are broke.
  • The doors are broke.
  • Gertrude. How cheerfully on the false trail they cry!
    O, this is counter, you false Danish dogs!

    Claudius. The doors are broke.

61 IV, 5, 2990
  • What is the cause, Laertes,
    That thy rebellion looks so giantlike?
    Let h...
  • What is the cause, Laertes,
    That thy rebellion looks so giantlike?
    Let him go, Gertrude. Do not fear our person.
    There's such divinity doth hedge a king
    That treason can but peep to what it would,
    Acts little of his will. Tell me, Laertes,
    Why thou art thus incens'd. Let him go, Gertrude.
    Speak, man.
  • Laertes. That drop of blood that's calm proclaims me bastard;
    Cries cuckold to my father; brands the harlot
    Even here between the chaste unsmirched brows
    Of my true mother.

    Claudius. What is the cause, Laertes,
    That thy rebellion looks so giantlike?
    Let him go, Gertrude. Do not fear our person.
    There's such divinity doth hedge a king
    That treason can but peep to what it would,
    Acts little of his will. Tell me, Laertes,
    Why thou art thus incens'd. Let him go, Gertrude.
    Speak, man.

62 IV, 5, 2999
  • Dead.
  • Dead.
  • Laertes. Where is my father?

    Claudius. Dead.

63 IV, 5, 3001
  • Let him demand his fill.
  • Let him demand his fill.
  • Gertrude. But not by him!

    Claudius. Let him demand his fill.

64 IV, 5, 3009
  • Who shall stay you?
  • Who shall stay you?
  • Laertes. How came he dead? I'll not be juggled with:
    To hell, allegiance! vows, to the blackest devil
    Conscience and grace, to the profoundest pit!
    I dare damnation. To this point I stand,
    That both the world, I give to negligence,
    Let come what comes; only I'll be reveng'd
    Most throughly for my father.

    Claudius. Who shall stay you?

65 IV, 5, 3013
  • Good Laertes,
    If you desire to know the certainty
    Of your dear father's...
  • Good Laertes,
    If you desire to know the certainty
    Of your dear father's death, is't writ in your revenge
    That sweepstake you will draw both friend and foe,
    Winner and loser?
  • Laertes. My will, not all the world!
    And for my means, I'll husband them so well
    They shall go far with little.

    Claudius. Good Laertes,
    If you desire to know the certainty
    Of your dear father's death, is't writ in your revenge
    That sweepstake you will draw both friend and foe,
    Winner and loser?

66 IV, 5, 3019
  • Will you know them then?
  • Will you know them then?
  • Laertes. None but his enemies.

    Claudius. Will you know them then?

67 IV, 5, 3023
  • Why, now You speak
    Like a good child and a true gentleman.
    That I am gui...
  • Why, now You speak
    Like a good child and a true gentleman.
    That I am guiltless of your father's death,
    And am most sensibly in grief for it,
    It shall as level to your judgment pierce
    As day does to your eye.
  • Laertes. To his good friends thus wide I'll ope my arms
    And, like the kind life-rend'ring pelican,
    Repast them with my blood.

    Claudius. Why, now You speak
    Like a good child and a true gentleman.
    That I am guiltless of your father's death,
    And am most sensibly in grief for it,
    It shall as level to your judgment pierce
    As day does to your eye.

68 IV, 5, 3078
  • Laertes, I must commune with your grief,
    Or you deny me right. Go but apart,...
  • Laertes, I must commune with your grief,
    Or you deny me right. Go but apart,
    Make choice of whom your wisest friends you will,
    And they shall hear and judge 'twixt you and me.
    If by direct or by collateral hand
    They find us touch'd, we will our kingdom give,
    Our crown, our life, and all that we call ours,
    To you in satisfaction; but if not,
    Be you content to lend your patience to us,
    And we shall jointly labour with your soul
    To give it due content.
  • Laertes. Do you see this, O God?

    Claudius. Laertes, I must commune with your grief,
    Or you deny me right. Go but apart,
    Make choice of whom your wisest friends you will,
    And they shall hear and judge 'twixt you and me.
    If by direct or by collateral hand
    They find us touch'd, we will our kingdom give,
    Our crown, our life, and all that we call ours,
    To you in satisfaction; but if not,
    Be you content to lend your patience to us,
    And we shall jointly labour with your soul
    To give it due content.

69 IV, 5, 3095
  • So you shall;
    And where th' offence is let the great axe fall.
    I pray yo...
  • So you shall;
    And where th' offence is let the great axe fall.
    I pray you go with me.
  • Laertes. Let this be so.
    His means of death, his obscure funeral-
    No trophy, sword, nor hatchment o'er his bones,
    No noble rite nor formal ostentation,-
    Cry to be heard, as 'twere from heaven to earth,
    That I must call't in question.

    Claudius. So you shall;
    And where th' offence is let the great axe fall.
    I pray you go with me.

70 IV, 7, 3131
  • Now must your conscience my acquittance seal,
    And You must put me in your he...
  • Now must your conscience my acquittance seal,
    And You must put me in your heart for friend,
    Sith you have heard, and with a knowing ear,
    That he which hath your noble father slain
    Pursued my life.
  • (stage directions). Enter King and Laertes.

    Claudius. Now must your conscience my acquittance seal,
    And You must put me in your heart for friend,
    Sith you have heard, and with a knowing ear,
    That he which hath your noble father slain
    Pursued my life.

71 IV, 7, 3141
  • O, for two special reasons,
    Which may to you, perhaps, seem much unsinew'd,...
  • O, for two special reasons,
    Which may to you, perhaps, seem much unsinew'd,
    But yet to me they are strong. The Queen his mother
    Lives almost by his looks; and for myself,-
    My virtue or my plague, be it either which,-
    She's so conjunctive to my life and soul
    That, as the star moves not but in his sphere,
    I could not but by her. The other motive
    Why to a public count I might not go
    Is the great love the general gender bear him,
    Who, dipping all his faults in their affection,
    Would, like the spring that turneth wood to stone,
    Convert his gives to graces; so that my arrows,
    Too slightly timber'd for so loud a wind,
    Would have reverted to my bow again,
    And not where I had aim'd them.
  • Laertes. It well appears. But tell me
    Why you proceeded not against these feats
    So crimeful and so capital in nature,
    As by your safety, wisdom, all things else,
    You mainly were stirr'd up.

    Claudius. O, for two special reasons,
    Which may to you, perhaps, seem much unsinew'd,
    But yet to me they are strong. The Queen his mother
    Lives almost by his looks; and for myself,-
    My virtue or my plague, be it either which,-
    She's so conjunctive to my life and soul
    That, as the star moves not but in his sphere,
    I could not but by her. The other motive
    Why to a public count I might not go
    Is the great love the general gender bear him,
    Who, dipping all his faults in their affection,
    Would, like the spring that turneth wood to stone,
    Convert his gives to graces; so that my arrows,
    Too slightly timber'd for so loud a wind,
    Would have reverted to my bow again,
    And not where I had aim'd them.

72 IV, 7, 3162
  • Break not your sleeps for that. You must not think
    That we are made of stuff...
  • Break not your sleeps for that. You must not think
    That we are made of stuff so flat and dull
    That we can let our beard be shook with danger,
    And think it pastime. You shortly shall hear more.
    I lov'd your father, and we love ourself,
    And that, I hope, will teach you to imagine-
    [Enter a Messenger with letters.]
    How now? What news?
  • Laertes. And so have I a noble father lost;
    A sister driven into desp'rate terms,
    Whose worth, if praises may go back again,
    Stood challenger on mount of all the age
    For her perfections. But my revenge will come.

    Claudius. Break not your sleeps for that. You must not think
    That we are made of stuff so flat and dull
    That we can let our beard be shook with danger,
    And think it pastime. You shortly shall hear more.
    I lov'd your father, and we love ourself,
    And that, I hope, will teach you to imagine-
    [Enter a Messenger with letters.]
    How now? What news?

73 IV, 7, 3172
  • From Hamlet? Who brought them?
  • From Hamlet? Who brought them?
  • Messenger. Letters, my lord, from Hamlet:
    This to your Majesty; this to the Queen.

    Claudius. From Hamlet? Who brought them?

74 IV, 7, 3176
  • Laertes, you shall hear them.
    Leave us.
    [Exit Messenger.]
    [Reads]'Hi...
  • Laertes, you shall hear them.
    Leave us.
    [Exit Messenger.]
    [Reads]'High and Mighty,-You shall know I am set naked on your
    kingdom. To-morrow shall I beg leave to see your kingly eyes;
    when I shall (first asking your pardon thereunto) recount the
    occasion of my sudden and more strange return. 'HAMLET.'
    What should this mean? Are all the rest come back?
    Or is it some abuse, and no such thing?
  • Messenger. Sailors, my lord, they say; I saw them not.
    They were given me by Claudio; he receiv'd them
    Of him that brought them.

    Claudius. Laertes, you shall hear them.
    Leave us.
    [Exit Messenger.]
    [Reads]'High and Mighty,-You shall know I am set naked on your
    kingdom. To-morrow shall I beg leave to see your kingly eyes;
    when I shall (first asking your pardon thereunto) recount the
    occasion of my sudden and more strange return. 'HAMLET.'
    What should this mean? Are all the rest come back?
    Or is it some abuse, and no such thing?

75 IV, 7, 3186
  • 'Tis Hamlet's character. 'Naked!'
    And in a postscript here, he says 'alone.'...
  • 'Tis Hamlet's character. 'Naked!'
    And in a postscript here, he says 'alone.'
    Can you advise me?
  • Laertes. Know you the hand?

    Claudius. 'Tis Hamlet's character. 'Naked!'
    And in a postscript here, he says 'alone.'
    Can you advise me?

76 IV, 7, 3193
  • If it be so, Laertes
    (As how should it be so? how otherwise?),
    Will you...
  • If it be so, Laertes
    (As how should it be so? how otherwise?),
    Will you be rul'd by me?
  • Laertes. I am lost in it, my lord. But let him come!
    It warms the very sickness in my heart
    That I shall live and tell him to his teeth,
    'Thus didest thou.'

    Claudius. If it be so, Laertes
    (As how should it be so? how otherwise?),
    Will you be rul'd by me?

77 IV, 7, 3198
  • To thine own peace. If he be now return'd
    As checking at his voyage, and tha...
  • To thine own peace. If he be now return'd
    As checking at his voyage, and that he means
    No more to undertake it, I will work him
    To exploit now ripe in my device,
    Under the which he shall not choose but fall;
    And for his death no wind shall breathe
    But even his mother shall uncharge the practice
    And call it accident.
  • Laertes. Ay my lord,
    So you will not o'errule me to a peace.

    Claudius. To thine own peace. If he be now return'd
    As checking at his voyage, and that he means
    No more to undertake it, I will work him
    To exploit now ripe in my device,
    Under the which he shall not choose but fall;
    And for his death no wind shall breathe
    But even his mother shall uncharge the practice
    And call it accident.

78 IV, 7, 3209
  • It falls right.
    You have been talk'd of since your travel much,
    And that...
  • It falls right.
    You have been talk'd of since your travel much,
    And that in Hamlet's hearing, for a quality
    Wherein they say you shine, Your sum of parts
    Did not together pluck such envy from him
    As did that one; and that, in my regard,
    Of the unworthiest siege.
  • Laertes. My lord, I will be rul'd;
    The rather, if you could devise it so
    That I might be the organ.

    Claudius. It falls right.
    You have been talk'd of since your travel much,
    And that in Hamlet's hearing, for a quality
    Wherein they say you shine, Your sum of parts
    Did not together pluck such envy from him
    As did that one; and that, in my regard,
    Of the unworthiest siege.

79 IV, 7, 3217
  • A very riband in the cap of youth-
    Yet needfull too; for youth no less becom...
  • A very riband in the cap of youth-
    Yet needfull too; for youth no less becomes
    The light and careless livery that it wears
    Than settled age his sables and his weeds,
    Importing health and graveness. Two months since
    Here was a gentleman of Normandy.
    I have seen myself, and serv'd against, the French,
    And they can well on horseback; but this gallant
    Had witchcraft in't. He grew unto his seat,
    And to such wondrous doing brought his horse
    As had he been incorps'd and demi-natur'd
    With the brave beast. So far he topp'd my thought
    That I, in forgery of shapes and tricks,
    Come short of what he did.
  • Laertes. What part is that, my lord?

    Claudius. A very riband in the cap of youth-
    Yet needfull too; for youth no less becomes
    The light and careless livery that it wears
    Than settled age his sables and his weeds,
    Importing health and graveness. Two months since
    Here was a gentleman of Normandy.
    I have seen myself, and serv'd against, the French,
    And they can well on horseback; but this gallant
    Had witchcraft in't. He grew unto his seat,
    And to such wondrous doing brought his horse
    As had he been incorps'd and demi-natur'd
    With the brave beast. So far he topp'd my thought
    That I, in forgery of shapes and tricks,
    Come short of what he did.

80 IV, 7, 3232
  • A Norman.
  • A Norman.
  • Laertes. A Norman was't?

    Claudius. A Norman.

81 IV, 7, 3234
  • The very same.
  • The very same.
  • Laertes. Upon my life, Lamound.

    Claudius. The very same.

82 IV, 7, 3237
  • He made confession of you;
    And gave you such a masterly report
    For art a...
  • He made confession of you;
    And gave you such a masterly report
    For art and exercise in your defence,
    And for your rapier most especially,
    That he cried out 'twould be a sight indeed
    If one could match you. The scrimers of their nation
    He swore had neither motion, guard, nor eye,
    If you oppos'd them. Sir, this report of his
    Did Hamlet so envenom with his envy
    That he could nothing do but wish and beg
    Your sudden coming o'er to play with you.
    Now, out of this-
  • Laertes. I know him well. He is the broach indeed
    And gem of all the nation.

    Claudius. He made confession of you;
    And gave you such a masterly report
    For art and exercise in your defence,
    And for your rapier most especially,
    That he cried out 'twould be a sight indeed
    If one could match you. The scrimers of their nation
    He swore had neither motion, guard, nor eye,
    If you oppos'd them. Sir, this report of his
    Did Hamlet so envenom with his envy
    That he could nothing do but wish and beg
    Your sudden coming o'er to play with you.
    Now, out of this-

83 IV, 7, 3250
  • Laertes, was your father dear to you?
    Or are you like the painting of a sorr...
  • Laertes, was your father dear to you?
    Or are you like the painting of a sorrow,
    A face without a heart,'
  • Laertes. What out of this, my lord?

    Claudius. Laertes, was your father dear to you?
    Or are you like the painting of a sorrow,
    A face without a heart,'

84 IV, 7, 3254
  • Not that I think you did not love your father;
    But that I know love is begun...
  • Not that I think you did not love your father;
    But that I know love is begun by time,
    And that I see, in passages of proof,
    Time qualifies the spark and fire of it.
    There lives within the very flame of love
    A kind of wick or snuff that will abate it;
    And nothing is at a like goodness still;
    For goodness, growing to a plurisy,
    Dies in his own too-much. That we would do,
    We should do when we would; for this 'would' changes,
    And hath abatements and delays as many
    As there are tongues, are hands, are accidents;
    And then this 'should' is like a spendthrift sigh,
    That hurts by easing. But to the quick o' th' ulcer!
    Hamlet comes back. What would you undertake
    To show yourself your father's son in deed
    More than in words?
  • Laertes. Why ask you this?

    Claudius. Not that I think you did not love your father;
    But that I know love is begun by time,
    And that I see, in passages of proof,
    Time qualifies the spark and fire of it.
    There lives within the very flame of love
    A kind of wick or snuff that will abate it;
    And nothing is at a like goodness still;
    For goodness, growing to a plurisy,
    Dies in his own too-much. That we would do,
    We should do when we would; for this 'would' changes,
    And hath abatements and delays as many
    As there are tongues, are hands, are accidents;
    And then this 'should' is like a spendthrift sigh,
    That hurts by easing. But to the quick o' th' ulcer!
    Hamlet comes back. What would you undertake
    To show yourself your father's son in deed
    More than in words?

85 IV, 7, 3272
  • No place indeed should murther sanctuarize;
    Revenge should have no bounds. B...
  • No place indeed should murther sanctuarize;
    Revenge should have no bounds. But, good Laertes,
    Will you do this? Keep close within your chamber.
    Hamlet return'd shall know you are come home.
    We'll put on those shall praise your excellence
    And set a double varnish on the fame
    The Frenchman gave you; bring you in fine together
    And wager on your heads. He, being remiss,
    Most generous, and free from all contriving,
    Will not peruse the foils; so that with ease,
    Or with a little shuffling, you may choose
    A sword unbated, and, in a pass of practice,
    Requite him for your father.
  • Laertes. To cut his throat i' th' church!

    Claudius. No place indeed should murther sanctuarize;
    Revenge should have no bounds. But, good Laertes,
    Will you do this? Keep close within your chamber.
    Hamlet return'd shall know you are come home.
    We'll put on those shall praise your excellence
    And set a double varnish on the fame
    The Frenchman gave you; bring you in fine together
    And wager on your heads. He, being remiss,
    Most generous, and free from all contriving,
    Will not peruse the foils; so that with ease,
    Or with a little shuffling, you may choose
    A sword unbated, and, in a pass of practice,
    Requite him for your father.

86 IV, 7, 3295
  • Let's further think of this,
    Weigh what convenience both of time and means <...
  • Let's further think of this,
    Weigh what convenience both of time and means
    May fit us to our shape. If this should fall,
    And that our drift look through our bad performance.
    'Twere better not assay'd. Therefore this project
    Should have a back or second, that might hold
    If this did blast in proof. Soft! let me see.
    We'll make a solemn wager on your cunnings-
    I ha't!
    When in your motion you are hot and dry-
    As make your bouts more violent to that end-
    And that he calls for drink, I'll have prepar'd him
    A chalice for the nonce; whereon but sipping,
    If he by chance escape your venom'd stuck,
    Our purpose may hold there.- But stay, what noise,
    [Enter Queen.]
    How now, sweet queen?
  • Laertes. I will do't!
    And for that purpose I'll anoint my sword.
    I bought an unction of a mountebank,
    So mortal that, but dip a knife in it,
    Where it draws blood no cataplasm so rare,
    Collected from all simples that have virtue
    Under the moon, can save the thing from death
    This is but scratch'd withal. I'll touch my point
    With this contagion, that, if I gall him slightly,
    It may be death.

    Claudius. Let's further think of this,
    Weigh what convenience both of time and means
    May fit us to our shape. If this should fall,
    And that our drift look through our bad performance.
    'Twere better not assay'd. Therefore this project
    Should have a back or second, that might hold
    If this did blast in proof. Soft! let me see.
    We'll make a solemn wager on your cunnings-
    I ha't!
    When in your motion you are hot and dry-
    As make your bouts more violent to that end-
    And that he calls for drink, I'll have prepar'd him
    A chalice for the nonce; whereon but sipping,
    If he by chance escape your venom'd stuck,
    Our purpose may hold there.- But stay, what noise,
    [Enter Queen.]
    How now, sweet queen?

87 IV, 7, 3342
  • Let's follow, Gertrude.
    How much I had to do to calm his rage I
    Now fea...
  • Let's follow, Gertrude.
    How much I had to do to calm his rage I
    Now fear I this will give it start again;
    Therefore let's follow.
  • Laertes. Too much of water hast thou, poor Ophelia,
    And therefore I forbid my tears; but yet
    It is our trick; nature her custom holds,
    Let shame say what it will. When these are gone,
    The woman will be out. Adieu, my lord.
    I have a speech of fire, that fain would blaze
    But that this folly douts it. Exit.

    Claudius. Let's follow, Gertrude.
    How much I had to do to calm his rage I
    Now fear I this will give it start again;
    Therefore let's follow.

88 V, 1, 3605
  • Pluck them asunder.
  • Pluck them asunder.
  • Hamlet. Thou pray'st not well.
    I prithee take thy fingers from my throat;
    For, though I am not splenitive and rash,
    Yet have I in me something dangerous,
    Which let thy wisdom fear. Hold off thy hand!

    Claudius. Pluck them asunder.

89 V, 1, 3616
  • O, he is mad, Laertes.
  • O, he is mad, Laertes.
  • Hamlet. I lov'd Ophelia. Forty thousand brothers
    Could not (with all their quantity of love)
    Make up my sum. What wilt thou do for her?

    Claudius. O, he is mad, Laertes.

90 V, 1, 3640
  • I pray thee, good Horatio, wait upon him.
    [Exit Horatio.]
    [To Laertes] S...
  • I pray thee, good Horatio, wait upon him.
    [Exit Horatio.]
    [To Laertes] Strengthen your patience in our last night's speech.
    We'll put the matter to the present push.-
    Good Gertrude, set some watch over your son.-
    This grave shall have a living monument.
    An hour of quiet shortly shall we see;
    Till then in patience our proceeding be.
  • (stage directions). Exit.

    Claudius. I pray thee, good Horatio, wait upon him.
    [Exit Horatio.]
    [To Laertes] Strengthen your patience in our last night's speech.
    We'll put the matter to the present push.-
    Good Gertrude, set some watch over your son.-
    This grave shall have a living monument.
    An hour of quiet shortly shall we see;
    Till then in patience our proceeding be.

91 V, 2, 3861
  • Come, Hamlet, come, and take this hand from me.
  • Come, Hamlet, come, and take this hand from me.
  • (stage directions). A table and flagons of wine on it.

    Claudius. Come, Hamlet, come, and take this hand from me.

92 V, 2, 3900
  • Give them the foils, young Osric. Cousin Hamlet,
    You know the wager?
  • Give them the foils, young Osric. Cousin Hamlet,
    You know the wager?
  • Hamlet. No, by this hand.

    Claudius. Give them the foils, young Osric. Cousin Hamlet,
    You know the wager?

93 V, 2, 3904
  • I do not fear it, I have seen you both;
    But since he is better'd, we have th...
  • I do not fear it, I have seen you both;
    But since he is better'd, we have therefore odds.
  • Hamlet. Very well, my lord.
    Your Grace has laid the odds o' th' weaker side.

    Claudius. I do not fear it, I have seen you both;
    But since he is better'd, we have therefore odds.

94 V, 2, 3910
  • Set me the stoups of wine upon that table.
    If Hamlet give the first or secon...
  • Set me the stoups of wine upon that table.
    If Hamlet give the first or second hit,
    Or quit in answer of the third exchange,
    Let all the battlements their ordnance fire;
    The King shall drink to Hamlet's better breath,
    And in the cup an union shall he throw
    Richer than that which four successive kings
    In Denmark's crown have worn. Give me the cups;
    And let the kettle to the trumpet speak,
    The trumpet to the cannoneer without,
    The cannons to the heavens, the heaven to earth,
    'Now the King drinks to Hamlet.' Come, begin.
    And you the judges, bear a wary eye.
  • Osric. Ay, my good lord.

    Claudius. Set me the stoups of wine upon that table.
    If Hamlet give the first or second hit,
    Or quit in answer of the third exchange,
    Let all the battlements their ordnance fire;
    The King shall drink to Hamlet's better breath,
    And in the cup an union shall he throw
    Richer than that which four successive kings
    In Denmark's crown have worn. Give me the cups;
    And let the kettle to the trumpet speak,
    The trumpet to the cannoneer without,
    The cannons to the heavens, the heaven to earth,
    'Now the King drinks to Hamlet.' Come, begin.
    And you the judges, bear a wary eye.

95 V, 2, 3930
  • Stay, give me drink. Hamlet, this pearl is thine;
    Here's to thy health.
    ...
  • Stay, give me drink. Hamlet, this pearl is thine;
    Here's to thy health.
    [Drum; trumpets sound; a piece goes off [within].]
    Give him the cup.
  • Laertes. Well, again!

    Claudius. Stay, give me drink. Hamlet, this pearl is thine;
    Here's to thy health.
    [Drum; trumpets sound; a piece goes off [within].]
    Give him the cup.

96 V, 2, 3937
  • Our son shall win.
  • Our son shall win.
  • Laertes. A touch, a touch; I do confess't.

    Claudius. Our son shall win.

97 V, 2, 3942
  • Gertrude, do not drink.
  • Gertrude, do not drink.
  • Hamlet. Good madam!

    Claudius. Gertrude, do not drink.

98 V, 2, 3944
  • [aside] It is the poison'd cup; it is too late.
  • [aside] It is the poison'd cup; it is too late.
  • Gertrude. I will, my lord; I pray you pardon me. Drinks.

    Claudius. [aside] It is the poison'd cup; it is too late.

99 V, 2, 3948
  • I do not think't.
  • I do not think't.
  • Laertes. My lord, I'll hit him now.

    Claudius. I do not think't.

100 V, 2, 3957
  • Part them! They are incens'd.
  • Part them! They are incens'd.
  • (stage directions). [Laertes wounds Hamlet; then] in scuffling, they change rapiers, [and Hamlet wounds Laertes].

    Claudius. Part them! They are incens'd.

101 V, 2, 3964
  • She sounds to see them bleed.
  • She sounds to see them bleed.
  • Hamlet. How does the Queen?

    Claudius. She sounds to see them bleed.

102 V, 2, 3981
  • O, yet defend me, friends! I am but hurt.
  • O, yet defend me, friends! I am but hurt.
  • All. Treason! treason!

    Claudius. O, yet defend me, friends! I am but hurt.

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