Speeches (Lines) for Costard in "Love's Labour's Lost"

Total: 83
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# Act, Scene, Line Speech text
1 I, 1, 195
  • Sir, the contempts thereof are as touching me.
  • Sir, the contempts thereof are as touching me.
  • Dull. Signior Arme--Arme--commends you. There's villany
    abroad: this letter will tell you more.

    Costard. Sir, the contempts thereof are as touching me.

2 I, 1, 204
  • The matter is to me, sir, as concerning Jaquenetta.
    The manner of it is, I w...
  • The matter is to me, sir, as concerning Jaquenetta.
    The manner of it is, I was taken with the manner.
  • Biron. Well, sir, be it as the style shall give us cause to
    climb in the merriness.

    Costard. The matter is to me, sir, as concerning Jaquenetta.
    The manner of it is, I was taken with the manner.

3 I, 1, 207
  • In manner and form following, sir; all those three:
    I was seen with her in t...
  • In manner and form following, sir; all those three:
    I was seen with her in the manor-house, sitting with
    her upon the form, and taken following her into the
    park; which, put together, is in manner and form
    following. Now, sir, for the manner,--it is the
    manner of a man to speak to a woman: for the form,--
    in some form.
  • Biron. In what manner?

    Costard. In manner and form following, sir; all those three:
    I was seen with her in the manor-house, sitting with
    her upon the form, and taken following her into the
    park; which, put together, is in manner and form
    following. Now, sir, for the manner,--it is the
    manner of a man to speak to a woman: for the form,--
    in some form.

4 I, 1, 215
  • As it shall follow in my correction: and God defend
    the right!
  • As it shall follow in my correction: and God defend
    the right!
  • Biron. For the following, sir?

    Costard. As it shall follow in my correction: and God defend
    the right!

5 I, 1, 219
  • Such is the simplicity of man to hearken after the flesh.
  • Such is the simplicity of man to hearken after the flesh.
  • Biron. As we would hear an oracle.

    Costard. Such is the simplicity of man to hearken after the flesh.

6 I, 1, 223
  • Not a word of Costard yet.
  • Not a word of Costard yet.
  • Ferdinand. [Reads] 'Great deputy, the welkin's vicegerent and
    sole dominator of Navarre, my soul's earth's god,
    and body's fostering patron.'

    Costard. Not a word of Costard yet.

7 I, 1, 225
  • It may be so: but if he say it is so, he is, in
    telling true, but so.
  • It may be so: but if he say it is so, he is, in
    telling true, but so.
  • Ferdinand. [Reads] 'So it is,'--

    Costard. It may be so: but if he say it is so, he is, in
    telling true, but so.

8 I, 1, 228
  • Be to me and every man that dares not fight!
  • Be to me and every man that dares not fight!
  • Ferdinand. Peace!

    Costard. Be to me and every man that dares not fight!

9 I, 1, 230
  • Of other men's secrets, I beseech you.
  • Of other men's secrets, I beseech you.
  • Ferdinand. No words!

    Costard. Of other men's secrets, I beseech you.

10 I, 1, 248
  • Me?
  • Me?
  • Ferdinand. [Reads] 'So it is, besieged with sable-coloured
    melancholy, I did commend the black-oppressing humour
    to the most wholesome physic of thy health-giving
    air; and, as I am a gentleman, betook myself to
    walk. The time when. About the sixth hour; when
    beasts most graze, birds best peck, and men sit down
    to that nourishment which is called supper: so much
    for the time when. Now for the ground which; which,
    I mean, I walked upon: it is y-cleped thy park. Then
    for the place where; where, I mean, I did encounter
    that obscene and preposterous event, that draweth
    from my snow-white pen the ebon-coloured ink, which
    here thou viewest, beholdest, surveyest, or seest;
    but to the place where; it standeth north-north-east
    and by east from the west corner of thy curious-
    knotted garden: there did I see that low-spirited
    swain, that base minnow of thy mirth,'--

    Costard. Me?

11 I, 1, 250
  • Me?
  • Me?
  • Ferdinand. [Reads] 'that unlettered small-knowing soul,'--

    Costard. Me?

12 I, 1, 252
  • Still me?
  • Still me?
  • Ferdinand. [Reads] 'that shallow vassal,'--

    Costard. Still me?

13 I, 1, 254
  • O, me!
  • O, me!
  • Ferdinand. [Reads] 'which, as I remember, hight Costard,'--

    Costard. O, me!

14 I, 1, 259
  • With a wench.
  • With a wench.
  • Ferdinand. [Reads] 'sorted and consorted, contrary to thy
    established proclaimed edict and continent canon,
    which with,--O, with--but with this I passion to say
    wherewith,--

    Costard. With a wench.

15 I, 1, 279
  • Sir, I confess the wench.
  • Sir, I confess the wench.
  • Ferdinand. Ay, the best for the worst. But, sirrah, what say
    you to this?

    Costard. Sir, I confess the wench.

16 I, 1, 281
  • I do confess much of the hearing it but little of
    the marking of it.
  • I do confess much of the hearing it but little of
    the marking of it.
  • Ferdinand. Did you hear the proclamation?

    Costard. I do confess much of the hearing it but little of
    the marking of it.

17 I, 1, 285
  • I was taken with none, sir: I was taken with a damsel.
  • I was taken with none, sir: I was taken with a damsel.
  • Ferdinand. It was proclaimed a year's imprisonment, to be taken
    with a wench.

    Costard. I was taken with none, sir: I was taken with a damsel.

18 I, 1, 287
  • This was no damsel, neither, sir; she was a virgin.
  • This was no damsel, neither, sir; she was a virgin.
  • Ferdinand. Well, it was proclaimed 'damsel.'

    Costard. This was no damsel, neither, sir; she was a virgin.

19 I, 1, 289
  • If it were, I deny her virginity: I was taken with a maid.
  • If it were, I deny her virginity: I was taken with a maid.
  • Ferdinand. It is so varied, too; for it was proclaimed 'virgin.'

    Costard. If it were, I deny her virginity: I was taken with a maid.

20 I, 1, 291
  • This maid will serve my turn, sir.
  • This maid will serve my turn, sir.
  • Ferdinand. This maid will not serve your turn, sir.

    Costard. This maid will serve my turn, sir.

21 I, 1, 294
  • I had rather pray a month with mutton and porridge.
  • I had rather pray a month with mutton and porridge.
  • Ferdinand. Sir, I will pronounce your sentence: you shall fast
    a week with bran and water.

    Costard. I had rather pray a month with mutton and porridge.

22 I, 1, 303
  • I suffer for the truth, sir; for true it is, I was
    taken with Jaquenetta, an...
  • I suffer for the truth, sir; for true it is, I was
    taken with Jaquenetta, and Jaquenetta is a true
    girl; and therefore welcome the sour cup of
    prosperity! Affliction may one day smile again; and
    till then, sit thee down, sorrow!
  • Biron. I'll lay my head to any good man's hat,
    These oaths and laws will prove an idle scorn.
    Sirrah, come on.

    Costard. I suffer for the truth, sir; for true it is, I was
    taken with Jaquenetta, and Jaquenetta is a true
    girl; and therefore welcome the sour cup of
    prosperity! Affliction may one day smile again; and
    till then, sit thee down, sorrow!

23 I, 2, 445
  • Well, sir, I hope, when I do it, I shall do it on a
    full stomach.
  • Well, sir, I hope, when I do it, I shall do it on a
    full stomach.
  • Don Adriano de Armado. Villain, thou shalt fast for thy offences ere thou
    be pardoned.

    Costard. Well, sir, I hope, when I do it, I shall do it on a
    full stomach.

24 I, 2, 448
  • I am more bound to you than your fellows, for they
    are but lightly rewarded....
  • I am more bound to you than your fellows, for they
    are but lightly rewarded.
  • Don Adriano de Armado. Thou shalt be heavily punished.

    Costard. I am more bound to you than your fellows, for they
    are but lightly rewarded.

25 I, 2, 452
  • Let me not be pent up, sir: I will fast, being loose.
  • Let me not be pent up, sir: I will fast, being loose.
  • Moth. Come, you transgressing slave; away!

    Costard. Let me not be pent up, sir: I will fast, being loose.

26 I, 2, 454
  • Well, if ever I do see the merry days of desolation
    that I have seen, some s...
  • Well, if ever I do see the merry days of desolation
    that I have seen, some shall see.
  • Moth. No, sir; that were fast and loose: thou shalt to prison.

    Costard. Well, if ever I do see the merry days of desolation
    that I have seen, some shall see.

27 I, 2, 457
  • Nay, nothing, Master Moth, but what they look upon.
    It is not for prisoners...
  • Nay, nothing, Master Moth, but what they look upon.
    It is not for prisoners to be too silent in their
    words; and therefore I will say nothing: I thank
    God I have as little patience as another man; and
    therefore I can be quiet.
  • Moth. What shall some see?

    Costard. Nay, nothing, Master Moth, but what they look upon.
    It is not for prisoners to be too silent in their
    words; and therefore I will say nothing: I thank
    God I have as little patience as another man; and
    therefore I can be quiet.

28 III, 1, 835
  • No enigma, no riddle, no l'envoy; no salve in the
    mail, sir: O, sir, plantai...
  • No enigma, no riddle, no l'envoy; no salve in the
    mail, sir: O, sir, plantain, a plain plantain! no
    l'envoy, no l'envoy; no salve, sir, but a plantain!
  • Don Adriano de Armado. Some enigma, some riddle: come, thy l'envoy; begin.

    Costard. No enigma, no riddle, no l'envoy; no salve in the
    mail, sir: O, sir, plantain, a plain plantain! no
    l'envoy, no l'envoy; no salve, sir, but a plantain!

29 III, 1, 863
  • The boy hath sold him a bargain, a goose, that's flat.
    Sir, your pennyworth...
  • The boy hath sold him a bargain, a goose, that's flat.
    Sir, your pennyworth is good, an your goose be fat.
    To sell a bargain well is as cunning as fast and loose:
    Let me see; a fat l'envoy; ay, that's a fat goose.
  • Moth. A good l'envoy, ending in the goose: would you
    desire more?

    Costard. The boy hath sold him a bargain, a goose, that's flat.
    Sir, your pennyworth is good, an your goose be fat.
    To sell a bargain well is as cunning as fast and loose:
    Let me see; a fat l'envoy; ay, that's a fat goose.

30 III, 1, 870
  • True, and I for a plantain: thus came your
    argument in;
    Then the boy's f...
  • True, and I for a plantain: thus came your
    argument in;
    Then the boy's fat l'envoy, the goose that you bought;
    And he ended the market.
  • Moth. By saying that a costard was broken in a shin.
    Then call'd you for the l'envoy.

    Costard. True, and I for a plantain: thus came your
    argument in;
    Then the boy's fat l'envoy, the goose that you bought;
    And he ended the market.

31 III, 1, 876
  • Thou hast no feeling of it, Moth: I will speak that l'envoy:
    I Costard, runn...
  • Thou hast no feeling of it, Moth: I will speak that l'envoy:
    I Costard, running out, that was safely within,
    Fell over the threshold and broke my shin.
  • Moth. I will tell you sensibly.

    Costard. Thou hast no feeling of it, Moth: I will speak that l'envoy:
    I Costard, running out, that was safely within,
    Fell over the threshold and broke my shin.

32 III, 1, 880
  • Till there be more matter in the shin.
  • Till there be more matter in the shin.
  • Don Adriano de Armado. We will talk no more of this matter.

    Costard. Till there be more matter in the shin.

33 III, 1, 882
  • O, marry me to one Frances: I smell some l'envoy,
    some goose, in this.
  • O, marry me to one Frances: I smell some l'envoy,
    some goose, in this.
  • Don Adriano de Armado. Sirrah Costard, I will enfranchise thee.

    Costard. O, marry me to one Frances: I smell some l'envoy,
    some goose, in this.

34 III, 1, 887
  • True, true; and now you will be my purgation and let me loose.
  • True, true; and now you will be my purgation and let me loose.
  • Don Adriano de Armado. By my sweet soul, I mean setting thee at liberty,
    enfreedoming thy person; thou wert immured,
    restrained, captivated, bound.

    Costard. True, true; and now you will be my purgation and let me loose.

35 III, 1, 897
  • My sweet ounce of man's flesh! my incony Jew!
    [Exit MOTH]
    Now will I loo...
  • My sweet ounce of man's flesh! my incony Jew!
    [Exit MOTH]
    Now will I look to his remuneration. Remuneration!
    O, that's the Latin word for three farthings: three
    farthings--remuneration.--'What's the price of this
    inkle?'--'One penny.'--'No, I'll give you a
    remuneration:' why, it carries it. Remuneration!
    why, it is a fairer name than French crown. I will
    never buy and sell out of this word.
  • Moth. Like the sequel, I. Signior Costard, adieu.

    Costard. My sweet ounce of man's flesh! my incony Jew!
    [Exit MOTH]
    Now will I look to his remuneration. Remuneration!
    O, that's the Latin word for three farthings: three
    farthings--remuneration.--'What's the price of this
    inkle?'--'One penny.'--'No, I'll give you a
    remuneration:' why, it carries it. Remuneration!
    why, it is a fairer name than French crown. I will
    never buy and sell out of this word.

36 III, 1, 908
  • Pray you, sir, how much carnation ribbon may a man
    buy for a remuneration?
  • Pray you, sir, how much carnation ribbon may a man
    buy for a remuneration?
  • Biron. O, my good knave Costard! exceedingly well met.

    Costard. Pray you, sir, how much carnation ribbon may a man
    buy for a remuneration?

37 III, 1, 911
  • Marry, sir, halfpenny farthing.
  • Marry, sir, halfpenny farthing.
  • Biron. What is a remuneration?

    Costard. Marry, sir, halfpenny farthing.

38 III, 1, 913
  • I thank your worship: God be wi' you!
  • I thank your worship: God be wi' you!
  • Biron. Why, then, three-farthing worth of silk.

    Costard. I thank your worship: God be wi' you!

39 III, 1, 917
  • When would you have it done, sir?
  • When would you have it done, sir?
  • Biron. Stay, slave; I must employ thee:
    As thou wilt win my favour, good my knave,
    Do one thing for me that I shall entreat.

    Costard. When would you have it done, sir?

40 III, 1, 919
  • Well, I will do it, sir: fare you well.
  • Well, I will do it, sir: fare you well.
  • Biron. This afternoon.

    Costard. Well, I will do it, sir: fare you well.

41 III, 1, 921
  • I shall know, sir, when I have done it.
  • I shall know, sir, when I have done it.
  • Biron. Thou knowest not what it is.

    Costard. I shall know, sir, when I have done it.

42 III, 1, 923
  • I will come to your worship to-morrow morning.
  • I will come to your worship to-morrow morning.
  • Biron. Why, villain, thou must know first.

    Costard. I will come to your worship to-morrow morning.

43 III, 1, 933
  • Gardon, O sweet gardon! better than remuneration,
    a'leven-pence farthing bet...
  • Gardon, O sweet gardon! better than remuneration,
    a'leven-pence farthing better: most sweet gardon! I
    will do it sir, in print. Gardon! Remuneration!
  • (stage directions). [Giving him a shilling]

    Costard. Gardon, O sweet gardon! better than remuneration,
    a'leven-pence farthing better: most sweet gardon! I
    will do it sir, in print. Gardon! Remuneration!

44 IV, 1, 1015
  • God dig-you-den all! Pray you, which is the head lady?
  • God dig-you-den all! Pray you, which is the head lady?
  • (stage directions). [Enter COSTARD]

    Costard. God dig-you-den all! Pray you, which is the head lady?

45 IV, 1, 1017
  • Which is the greatest lady, the highest?
  • Which is the greatest lady, the highest?
  • Princess of France. Thou shalt know her, fellow, by the rest that have no heads.

    Costard. Which is the greatest lady, the highest?

46 IV, 1, 1019
  • The thickest and the tallest! it is so; truth is truth.
    An your waist, mistr...
  • The thickest and the tallest! it is so; truth is truth.
    An your waist, mistress, were as slender as my wit,
    One o' these maids' girdles for your waist should be fit.
    Are not you the chief woman? you are the thickest here.
  • Princess of France. The thickest and the tallest.

    Costard. The thickest and the tallest! it is so; truth is truth.
    An your waist, mistress, were as slender as my wit,
    One o' these maids' girdles for your waist should be fit.
    Are not you the chief woman? you are the thickest here.

47 IV, 1, 1024
  • I have a letter from Monsieur Biron to one Lady Rosaline.
  • I have a letter from Monsieur Biron to one Lady Rosaline.
  • Princess of France. What's your will, sir? what's your will?

    Costard. I have a letter from Monsieur Biron to one Lady Rosaline.

48 IV, 1, 1078
  • I told you; my lord.
  • I told you; my lord.
  • Princess of France. Thou fellow, a word:
    Who gave thee this letter?

    Costard. I told you; my lord.

49 IV, 1, 1080
  • From my lord to my lady.
  • From my lord to my lady.
  • Princess of France. To whom shouldst thou give it?

    Costard. From my lord to my lady.

50 IV, 1, 1082
  • From my lord Biron, a good master of mine,
    To a lady of France that he call'...
  • From my lord Biron, a good master of mine,
    To a lady of France that he call'd Rosaline.
  • Princess of France. From which lord to which lady?

    Costard. From my lord Biron, a good master of mine,
    To a lady of France that he call'd Rosaline.

51 IV, 1, 1114
  • By my troth, most pleasant: how both did fit it!
  • By my troth, most pleasant: how both did fit it!
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt ROSALINE and KATHARINE]

    Costard. By my troth, most pleasant: how both did fit it!

52 IV, 1, 1119
  • Indeed, a' must shoot nearer, or he'll ne'er hit the clout.
  • Indeed, a' must shoot nearer, or he'll ne'er hit the clout.
  • Maria. Wide o' the bow hand! i' faith, your hand is out.

    Costard. Indeed, a' must shoot nearer, or he'll ne'er hit the clout.

53 IV, 1, 1121
  • Then will she get the upshoot by cleaving the pin.
  • Then will she get the upshoot by cleaving the pin.
  • Boyet. An if my hand be out, then belike your hand is in.

    Costard. Then will she get the upshoot by cleaving the pin.

54 IV, 1, 1123
  • She's too hard for you at pricks, sir: challenge her to bowl.
  • She's too hard for you at pricks, sir: challenge her to bowl.
  • Maria. Come, come, you talk greasily; your lips grow foul.

    Costard. She's too hard for you at pricks, sir: challenge her to bowl.

55 IV, 1, 1126
  • By my soul, a swain! a most simple clown!
    Lord, Lord, how the ladies and I h...
  • By my soul, a swain! a most simple clown!
    Lord, Lord, how the ladies and I have put him down!
    O' my troth, most sweet jests! most incony
    vulgar wit!
    When it comes so smoothly off, so obscenely, as it
    were, so fit.
    Armado o' th' one side,--O, a most dainty man!
    To see him walk before a lady and to bear her fan!
    To see him kiss his hand! and how most sweetly a'
    will swear!
    And his page o' t' other side, that handful of wit!
    Ah, heavens, it is a most pathetical nit!
    Sola, sola!
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt BOYET and MARIA]

    Costard. By my soul, a swain! a most simple clown!
    Lord, Lord, how the ladies and I have put him down!
    O' my troth, most sweet jests! most incony
    vulgar wit!
    When it comes so smoothly off, so obscenely, as it
    were, so fit.
    Armado o' th' one side,--O, a most dainty man!
    To see him walk before a lady and to bear her fan!
    To see him kiss his hand! and how most sweetly a'
    will swear!
    And his page o' t' other side, that handful of wit!
    Ah, heavens, it is a most pathetical nit!
    Sola, sola!

56 IV, 2, 1233
  • Marry, master schoolmaster, he that is likest to a hogshead.
  • Marry, master schoolmaster, he that is likest to a hogshead.
  • Holofernes. Master Parson, quasi pers-on. An if one should be
    pierced, which is the one?

    Costard. Marry, master schoolmaster, he that is likest to a hogshead.

57 IV, 2, 1294
  • Have with thee, my girl.
  • Have with thee, my girl.
  • Jaquenetta. Good Costard, go with me. Sir, God save your life!

    Costard. Have with thee, my girl.

58 IV, 3, 1525
  • Some certain treason.
  • Some certain treason.
  • Ferdinand. What present hast thou there?

    Costard. Some certain treason.

59 IV, 3, 1527
  • Nay, it makes nothing, sir.
  • Nay, it makes nothing, sir.
  • Ferdinand. What makes treason here?

    Costard. Nay, it makes nothing, sir.

60 IV, 3, 1537
  • Of Dun Adramadio, Dun Adramadio.
  • Of Dun Adramadio, Dun Adramadio.
  • Ferdinand. Where hadst thou it?

    Costard. Of Dun Adramadio, Dun Adramadio.

61 IV, 3, 1556
  • Walk aside the true folk, and let the traitors stay.
  • Walk aside the true folk, and let the traitors stay.
  • Ferdinand. Hence, sirs; away!

    Costard. Walk aside the true folk, and let the traitors stay.

62 V, 1, 1774
  • O, they have lived long on the alms-basket of words.
    I marvel thy master hat...
  • O, they have lived long on the alms-basket of words.
    I marvel thy master hath not eaten thee for a word;
    for thou art not so long by the head as
    honorificabilitudinitatibus: thou art easier
    swallowed than a flap-dragon.
  • Moth. [Aside to COSTARD] They have been at a great feast
    of languages, and stolen the scraps.

    Costard. O, they have lived long on the alms-basket of words.
    I marvel thy master hath not eaten thee for a word;
    for thou art not so long by the head as
    honorificabilitudinitatibus: thou art easier
    swallowed than a flap-dragon.

63 V, 1, 1799
  • An I had but one penny in the world, thou shouldst
    have it to buy gingerbrea...
  • An I had but one penny in the world, thou shouldst
    have it to buy gingerbread: hold, there is the very
    remuneration I had of thy master, thou halfpenny
    purse of wit, thou pigeon-egg of discretion. O, an
    the heavens were so pleased that thou wert but my
    bastard, what a joyful father wouldst thou make me!
    Go to; thou hast it ad dunghill, at the fingers'
    ends, as they say.
  • Moth. Lend me your horn to make one, and I will whip about
    your infamy circum circa,--a gig of a cuckold's horn.

    Costard. An I had but one penny in the world, thou shouldst
    have it to buy gingerbread: hold, there is the very
    remuneration I had of thy master, thou halfpenny
    purse of wit, thou pigeon-egg of discretion. O, an
    the heavens were so pleased that thou wert but my
    bastard, what a joyful father wouldst thou make me!
    Go to; thou hast it ad dunghill, at the fingers'
    ends, as they say.

64 V, 2, 2415
  • O Lord, sir, they would know
    Whether the three Worthies shall come in or no....
  • O Lord, sir, they would know
    Whether the three Worthies shall come in or no.
  • Biron. Lo, he is tilting straight! Peace! I have done.
    [Enter COSTARD]
    Welcome, pure wit! thou partest a fair fray.

    Costard. O Lord, sir, they would know
    Whether the three Worthies shall come in or no.

65 V, 2, 2418
  • No, sir; but it is vara fine,
    For every one pursents three.
  • No, sir; but it is vara fine,
    For every one pursents three.
  • Biron. What, are there but three?

    Costard. No, sir; but it is vara fine,
    For every one pursents three.

66 V, 2, 2421
  • Not so, sir; under correction, sir; I hope it is not so.
    You cannot beg us,...
  • Not so, sir; under correction, sir; I hope it is not so.
    You cannot beg us, sir, I can assure you, sir we know
    what we know:
    I hope, sir, three times thrice, sir,--
  • Biron. And three times thrice is nine.

    Costard. Not so, sir; under correction, sir; I hope it is not so.
    You cannot beg us, sir, I can assure you, sir we know
    what we know:
    I hope, sir, three times thrice, sir,--

67 V, 2, 2426
  • Under correction, sir, we know whereuntil it doth amount.
  • Under correction, sir, we know whereuntil it doth amount.
  • Biron. Is not nine.

    Costard. Under correction, sir, we know whereuntil it doth amount.

68 V, 2, 2428
  • O Lord, sir, it were pity you should get your living
    by reckoning, sir.
  • O Lord, sir, it were pity you should get your living
    by reckoning, sir.
  • Biron. By Jove, I always took three threes for nine.

    Costard. O Lord, sir, it were pity you should get your living
    by reckoning, sir.

69 V, 2, 2431
  • O Lord, sir, the parties themselves, the actors,
    sir, will show whereuntil i...
  • O Lord, sir, the parties themselves, the actors,
    sir, will show whereuntil it doth amount: for mine
    own part, I am, as they say, but to parfect one man
    in one poor man, Pompion the Great, sir.
  • Biron. How much is it?

    Costard. O Lord, sir, the parties themselves, the actors,
    sir, will show whereuntil it doth amount: for mine
    own part, I am, as they say, but to parfect one man
    in one poor man, Pompion the Great, sir.

70 V, 2, 2436
  • It pleased them to think me worthy of Pompion the
    Great: for mine own part,...
  • It pleased them to think me worthy of Pompion the
    Great: for mine own part, I know not the degree of
    the Worthy, but I am to stand for him.
  • Biron. Art thou one of the Worthies?

    Costard. It pleased them to think me worthy of Pompion the
    Great: for mine own part, I know not the degree of
    the Worthy, but I am to stand for him.

71 V, 2, 2440
  • We will turn it finely off, sir; we will take
    some care.
  • We will turn it finely off, sir; we will take
    some care.
  • Biron. Go, bid them prepare.

    Costard. We will turn it finely off, sir; we will take
    some care.

72 V, 2, 2481
  • I Pompey am,--
  • I Pompey am,--
  • (stage directions). [Enter COSTARD, for Pompey]

    Costard. I Pompey am,--

73 V, 2, 2483
  • I Pompey am,--
  • I Pompey am,--
  • Boyet. You lie, you are not he.

    Costard. I Pompey am,--

74 V, 2, 2487
  • I Pompey am, Pompey surnamed the Big--
  • I Pompey am, Pompey surnamed the Big--
  • Biron. Well said, old mocker: I must needs be friends
    with thee.

    Costard. I Pompey am, Pompey surnamed the Big--

75 V, 2, 2489
  • It is, 'Great,' sir:--
    Pompey surnamed the Great;
    That oft in field, wit...
  • It is, 'Great,' sir:--
    Pompey surnamed the Great;
    That oft in field, with targe and shield, did make
    my foe to sweat:
    And travelling along this coast, I here am come by chance,
    And lay my arms before the legs of this sweet lass of France,
    If your ladyship would say, 'Thanks, Pompey,' I had done.
  • Dumain. The Great.

    Costard. It is, 'Great,' sir:--
    Pompey surnamed the Great;
    That oft in field, with targe and shield, did make
    my foe to sweat:
    And travelling along this coast, I here am come by chance,
    And lay my arms before the legs of this sweet lass of France,
    If your ladyship would say, 'Thanks, Pompey,' I had done.

76 V, 2, 2497
  • 'Tis not so much worth; but I hope I was perfect: I
    made a little fault in '...
  • 'Tis not so much worth; but I hope I was perfect: I
    made a little fault in 'Great.'
  • Princess of France. Great thanks, great Pompey.

    Costard. 'Tis not so much worth; but I hope I was perfect: I
    made a little fault in 'Great.'

77 V, 2, 2513
  • Your servant, and Costard.
  • Your servant, and Costard.
  • Biron. Pompey the Great,--

    Costard. Your servant, and Costard.

78 V, 2, 2515
  • [To SIR NATHANIEL] O, sir, you have overthrown
    Alisander the conqueror! You...
  • [To SIR NATHANIEL] O, sir, you have overthrown
    Alisander the conqueror! You will be scraped out of
    the painted cloth for this: your lion, that holds
    his poll-axe sitting on a close-stool, will be given
    to Ajax: he will be the ninth Worthy. A conqueror,
    and afeard to speak! run away for shame, Alisander.
    [SIR NATHANIEL retires]
    There, an't shall please you; a foolish mild man; an
    honest man, look you, and soon dashed. He is a
    marvellous good neighbour, faith, and a very good
    bowler: but, for Alisander,--alas, you see how
    'tis,--a little o'erparted. But there are Worthies
    a-coming will speak their mind in some other sort.
  • Biron. Take away the conqueror, take away Alisander.

    Costard. [To SIR NATHANIEL] O, sir, you have overthrown
    Alisander the conqueror! You will be scraped out of
    the painted cloth for this: your lion, that holds
    his poll-axe sitting on a close-stool, will be given
    to Ajax: he will be the ninth Worthy. A conqueror,
    and afeard to speak! run away for shame, Alisander.
    [SIR NATHANIEL retires]
    There, an't shall please you; a foolish mild man; an
    honest man, look you, and soon dashed. He is a
    marvellous good neighbour, faith, and a very good
    bowler: but, for Alisander,--alas, you see how
    'tis,--a little o'erparted. But there are Worthies
    a-coming will speak their mind in some other sort.

79 V, 2, 2612
  • The party is gone, fellow Hector, she is gone; she
    is two months on her way....
  • The party is gone, fellow Hector, she is gone; she
    is two months on her way.
  • Don Adriano de Armado. This Hector far surmounted Hannibal,--

    Costard. The party is gone, fellow Hector, she is gone; she
    is two months on her way.

80 V, 2, 2615
  • Faith, unless you play the honest Troyan, the poor
    wench is cast away: she's...
  • Faith, unless you play the honest Troyan, the poor
    wench is cast away: she's quick; the child brags in
    her belly already: tis yours.
  • Don Adriano de Armado. What meanest thou?

    Costard. Faith, unless you play the honest Troyan, the poor
    wench is cast away: she's quick; the child brags in
    her belly already: tis yours.

81 V, 2, 2620
  • Then shall Hector be whipped for Jaquenetta that is
    quick by him and hanged...
  • Then shall Hector be whipped for Jaquenetta that is
    quick by him and hanged for Pompey that is dead by
    him.
  • Don Adriano de Armado. Dost thou infamonize me among potentates? thou shalt
    die.

    Costard. Then shall Hector be whipped for Jaquenetta that is
    quick by him and hanged for Pompey that is dead by
    him.

82 V, 2, 2634
  • I will not fight with a pole, like a northern man:
    I'll slash; I'll do it by...
  • I will not fight with a pole, like a northern man:
    I'll slash; I'll do it by the sword. I bepray you,
    let me borrow my arms again.
  • Don Adriano de Armado. By the north pole, I do challenge thee.

    Costard. I will not fight with a pole, like a northern man:
    I'll slash; I'll do it by the sword. I bepray you,
    let me borrow my arms again.

83 V, 2, 2638
  • I'll do it in my shirt.
  • I'll do it in my shirt.
  • Dumain. Room for the incensed Worthies!

    Costard. I'll do it in my shirt.

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© Copyright 2017-2020 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.