Speeches (Lines) for Decius Brutus in "The Tragedy of Julius Caesar"

Total: 12
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 II / 1
  • Here lies the east: doth not the day break here?
  • Here lies the east: doth not the day break here?
  • Cassius. Shall I entreat a word?

    Decius Brutus. Here lies the east: doth not the day break here?

2 II / 1
  • Shall no man else be touch'd but only Caesar?
  • Shall no man else be touch'd but only Caesar?
  • Casca. Indeed he is not fit.

    Decius Brutus. Shall no man else be touch'd but only Caesar?

3 II / 1
  • Never fear that: if he be so resolved,
    I can o'ersway him; for he loves to h...
  • Never fear that: if he be so resolved,
    I can o'ersway him; for he loves to hear
    That unicorns may be betray'd with trees,
    And bears with glasses, elephants with holes,
    Lions with toils and men with flatterers;
    But when I tell him he hates flatterers,
    He says he does, being then most flattered.
    Let me work;
    For I can give his humour the true bent,
    And I will bring him to the Capitol.
  • Cassius. But it is doubtful yet,
    Whether Caesar will come forth to-day, or no;
    For he is superstitious grown of late,
    Quite from the main opinion he held once
    Of fantasy, of dreams and ceremonies:
    It may be, these apparent prodigies,
    The unaccustom'd terror of this night,
    And the persuasion of his augurers,
    May hold him from the Capitol to-day.

    Decius Brutus. Never fear that: if he be so resolved,
    I can o'ersway him; for he loves to hear
    That unicorns may be betray'd with trees,
    And bears with glasses, elephants with holes,
    Lions with toils and men with flatterers;
    But when I tell him he hates flatterers,
    He says he does, being then most flattered.
    Let me work;
    For I can give his humour the true bent,
    And I will bring him to the Capitol.

4 II / 2
  • Caesar, all hail! good morrow, worthy Caesar:
    I come to fetch you to the sen...
  • Caesar, all hail! good morrow, worthy Caesar:
    I come to fetch you to the senate-house.
  • Caesar. Mark Antony shall say I am not well,
    And, for thy humour, I will stay at home.
    [Enter DECIUS BRUTUS]
    Here's Decius Brutus, he shall tell them so.

    Decius Brutus. Caesar, all hail! good morrow, worthy Caesar:
    I come to fetch you to the senate-house.

5 II / 2
  • Most mighty Caesar, let me know some cause,
    Lest I be laugh'd at when I tell...
  • Most mighty Caesar, let me know some cause,
    Lest I be laugh'd at when I tell them so.
  • Caesar. Shall Caesar send a lie?
    Have I in conquest stretch'd mine arm so far,
    To be afraid to tell graybeards the truth?
    Decius, go tell them Caesar will not come.

    Decius Brutus. Most mighty Caesar, let me know some cause,
    Lest I be laugh'd at when I tell them so.

6 II / 2
  • This dream is all amiss interpreted;
    It was a vision fair and fortunate:
  • This dream is all amiss interpreted;
    It was a vision fair and fortunate:
    Your statue spouting blood in many pipes,
    In which so many smiling Romans bathed,
    Signifies that from you great Rome shall suck
    Reviving blood, and that great men shall press
    For tinctures, stains, relics and cognizance.
    This by Calpurnia's dream is signified.
  • Caesar. The cause is in my will: I will not come;
    That is enough to satisfy the senate.
    But for your private satisfaction,
    Because I love you, I will let you know:
    Calpurnia here, my wife, stays me at home:
    She dreamt to-night she saw my statua,
    Which, like a fountain with an hundred spouts,
    Did run pure blood: and many lusty Romans
    Came smiling, and did bathe their hands in it:
    And these does she apply for warnings, and portents,
    And evils imminent; and on her knee
    Hath begg'd that I will stay at home to-day.

    Decius Brutus. This dream is all amiss interpreted;
    It was a vision fair and fortunate:
    Your statue spouting blood in many pipes,
    In which so many smiling Romans bathed,
    Signifies that from you great Rome shall suck
    Reviving blood, and that great men shall press
    For tinctures, stains, relics and cognizance.
    This by Calpurnia's dream is signified.

7 II / 2
  • I have, when you have heard what I can say:
    And know it now: the senate have...
  • I have, when you have heard what I can say:
    And know it now: the senate have concluded
    To give this day a crown to mighty Caesar.
    If you shall send them word you will not come,
    Their minds may change. Besides, it were a mock
    Apt to be render'd, for some one to say
    'Break up the senate till another time,
    When Caesar's wife shall meet with better dreams.'
    If Caesar hide himself, shall they not whisper
    'Lo, Caesar is afraid'?
    Pardon me, Caesar; for my dear dear love
    To our proceeding bids me tell you this;
    And reason to my love is liable.
  • Caesar. And this way have you well expounded it.

    Decius Brutus. I have, when you have heard what I can say:
    And know it now: the senate have concluded
    To give this day a crown to mighty Caesar.
    If you shall send them word you will not come,
    Their minds may change. Besides, it were a mock
    Apt to be render'd, for some one to say
    'Break up the senate till another time,
    When Caesar's wife shall meet with better dreams.'
    If Caesar hide himself, shall they not whisper
    'Lo, Caesar is afraid'?
    Pardon me, Caesar; for my dear dear love
    To our proceeding bids me tell you this;
    And reason to my love is liable.

8 III / 1
  • Trebonius doth desire you to o'erread,
    At your best leisure, this his humble...
  • Trebonius doth desire you to o'erread,
    At your best leisure, this his humble suit.
  • Artemidorus. Hail, Caesar! read this schedule.

    Decius Brutus. Trebonius doth desire you to o'erread,
    At your best leisure, this his humble suit.

9 III / 1
  • Where is Metellus Cimber? Let him go,
    And presently prefer his suit to Caesa...
  • Where is Metellus Cimber? Let him go,
    And presently prefer his suit to Caesar.
  • Cassius. Trebonius knows his time; for, look you, Brutus.
    He draws Mark Antony out of the way.

    Decius Brutus. Where is Metellus Cimber? Let him go,
    And presently prefer his suit to Caesar.

10 III / 1
  • Great Caesar,--
  • Great Caesar,--
  • Caesar. Hence! wilt thou lift up Olympus?

    Decius Brutus. Great Caesar,--

11 III / 1
  • And Cassius too.
  • And Cassius too.
  • Casca. Go to the pulpit, Brutus.

    Decius Brutus. And Cassius too.

12 III / 1
  • What, shall we forth?
  • What, shall we forth?
  • Cassius. So oft as that shall be,
    So often shall the knot of us be call'd
    The men that gave their country liberty.

    Decius Brutus. What, shall we forth?

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.