Speeches (Lines) for Demetrius in "A Midsummer Night's Dream"

Total: 48
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 1
  • Relent, sweet Hermia: and, Lysander, yield
    Thy crazed title to my certain ri...
  • Relent, sweet Hermia: and, Lysander, yield
    Thy crazed title to my certain right.
  • Theseus. Take time to pause; and, by the nest new moon--
    The sealing-day betwixt my love and me,
    For everlasting bond of fellowship--
    Upon that day either prepare to die
    For disobedience to your father's will,
    Or else to wed Demetrius, as he would;
    Or on Diana's altar to protest
    For aye austerity and single life.

    Demetrius. Relent, sweet Hermia: and, Lysander, yield
    Thy crazed title to my certain right.

2 II / 1
  • I love thee not, therefore pursue me not.
    Where is Lysander and fair Hermia?...
  • I love thee not, therefore pursue me not.
    Where is Lysander and fair Hermia?
    The one I'll slay, the other slayeth me.
    Thou told'st me they were stolen unto this wood;
    And here am I, and wode within this wood,
    Because I cannot meet my Hermia.
    Hence, get thee gone, and follow me no more.
  • Oberon. Having once this juice,
    I'll watch Titania when she is asleep,
    And drop the liquor of it in her eyes.
    The next thing then she waking looks upon,
    Be it on lion, bear, or wolf, or bull,
    On meddling monkey, or on busy ape,
    She shall pursue it with the soul of love:
    And ere I take this charm from off her sight,
    As I can take it with another herb,
    I'll make her render up her page to me.
    But who comes here? I am invisible;
    And I will overhear their conference.

    Demetrius. I love thee not, therefore pursue me not.
    Where is Lysander and fair Hermia?
    The one I'll slay, the other slayeth me.
    Thou told'st me they were stolen unto this wood;
    And here am I, and wode within this wood,
    Because I cannot meet my Hermia.
    Hence, get thee gone, and follow me no more.

3 II / 1
  • Do I entice you? do I speak you fair?
    Or, rather, do I not in plainest truth...
  • Do I entice you? do I speak you fair?
    Or, rather, do I not in plainest truth
    Tell you, I do not, nor I cannot love you?
  • Helena. You draw me, you hard-hearted adamant;
    But yet you draw not iron, for my heart
    Is true as steel: leave you your power to draw,
    And I shall have no power to follow you.

    Demetrius. Do I entice you? do I speak you fair?
    Or, rather, do I not in plainest truth
    Tell you, I do not, nor I cannot love you?

4 II / 1
  • Tempt not too much the hatred of my spirit;
    For I am sick when I do look on...
  • Tempt not too much the hatred of my spirit;
    For I am sick when I do look on thee.
  • Helena. And even for that do I love you the more.
    I am your spaniel; and, Demetrius,
    The more you beat me, I will fawn on you:
    Use me but as your spaniel, spurn me, strike me,
    Neglect me, lose me; only give me leave,
    Unworthy as I am, to follow you.
    What worser place can I beg in your love,--
    And yet a place of high respect with me,--
    Than to be used as you use your dog?

    Demetrius. Tempt not too much the hatred of my spirit;
    For I am sick when I do look on thee.

5 II / 1
  • You do impeach your modesty too much,
    To leave the city and commit yourself...
  • You do impeach your modesty too much,
    To leave the city and commit yourself
    Into the hands of one that loves you not;
    To trust the opportunity of night
    And the ill counsel of a desert place
    With the rich worth of your virginity.
  • Helena. And I am sick when I look not on you.

    Demetrius. You do impeach your modesty too much,
    To leave the city and commit yourself
    Into the hands of one that loves you not;
    To trust the opportunity of night
    And the ill counsel of a desert place
    With the rich worth of your virginity.

6 II / 1
  • I'll run from thee and hide me in the brakes,
    And leave thee to the mercy of...
  • I'll run from thee and hide me in the brakes,
    And leave thee to the mercy of wild beasts.
  • Helena. Your virtue is my privilege: for that
    It is not night when I do see your face,
    Therefore I think I am not in the night;
    Nor doth this wood lack worlds of company,
    For you in my respect are all the world:
    Then how can it be said I am alone,
    When all the world is here to look on me?

    Demetrius. I'll run from thee and hide me in the brakes,
    And leave thee to the mercy of wild beasts.

7 II / 1
  • I will not stay thy questions; let me go:
    Or, if thou follow me, do not beli...
  • I will not stay thy questions; let me go:
    Or, if thou follow me, do not believe
    But I shall do thee mischief in the wood.
  • Helena. The wildest hath not such a heart as you.
    Run when you will, the story shall be changed:
    Apollo flies, and Daphne holds the chase;
    The dove pursues the griffin; the mild hind
    Makes speed to catch the tiger; bootless speed,
    When cowardice pursues and valour flies.

    Demetrius. I will not stay thy questions; let me go:
    Or, if thou follow me, do not believe
    But I shall do thee mischief in the wood.

8 II / 2
  • I charge thee, hence, and do not haunt me thus.
  • I charge thee, hence, and do not haunt me thus.
  • Helena. Stay, though thou kill me, sweet Demetrius.

    Demetrius. I charge thee, hence, and do not haunt me thus.

9 II / 2
  • Stay, on thy peril: I alone will go.
  • Stay, on thy peril: I alone will go.
  • Helena. O, wilt thou darkling leave me? do not so.

    Demetrius. Stay, on thy peril: I alone will go.

10 III / 2
  • O, why rebuke you him that loves you so?
    Lay breath so bitter on your bitter...
  • O, why rebuke you him that loves you so?
    Lay breath so bitter on your bitter foe.
  • Puck. This is the woman, but not this the man.

    Demetrius. O, why rebuke you him that loves you so?
    Lay breath so bitter on your bitter foe.

11 III / 2
  • So should the murder'd look, and so should I,
    Pierced through the heart with...
  • So should the murder'd look, and so should I,
    Pierced through the heart with your stern cruelty:
    Yet you, the murderer, look as bright, as clear,
    As yonder Venus in her glimmering sphere.
  • Hermia. Now I but chide; but I should use thee worse,
    For thou, I fear, hast given me cause to curse,
    If thou hast slain Lysander in his sleep,
    Being o'er shoes in blood, plunge in the deep,
    And kill me too.
    The sun was not so true unto the day
    As he to me: would he have stolen away
    From sleeping Hermia? I'll believe as soon
    This whole earth may be bored and that the moon
    May through the centre creep and so displease
    Her brother's noontide with Antipodes.
    It cannot be but thou hast murder'd him;
    So should a murderer look, so dead, so grim.

    Demetrius. So should the murder'd look, and so should I,
    Pierced through the heart with your stern cruelty:
    Yet you, the murderer, look as bright, as clear,
    As yonder Venus in her glimmering sphere.

12 III / 2
  • I had rather give his carcass to my hounds.
  • I had rather give his carcass to my hounds.
  • Hermia. What's this to my Lysander? where is he?
    Ah, good Demetrius, wilt thou give him me?

    Demetrius. I had rather give his carcass to my hounds.

13 III / 2
  • You spend your passion on a misprised mood:
    I am not guilty of Lysander's bl...
  • You spend your passion on a misprised mood:
    I am not guilty of Lysander's blood;
    Nor is he dead, for aught that I can tell.
  • Hermia. Out, dog! out, cur! thou drivest me past the bounds
    Of maiden's patience. Hast thou slain him, then?
    Henceforth be never number'd among men!
    O, once tell true, tell true, even for my sake!
    Durst thou have look'd upon him being awake,
    And hast thou kill'd him sleeping? O brave touch!
    Could not a worm, an adder, do so much?
    An adder did it; for with doubler tongue
    Than thine, thou serpent, never adder stung.

    Demetrius. You spend your passion on a misprised mood:
    I am not guilty of Lysander's blood;
    Nor is he dead, for aught that I can tell.

14 III / 2
  • An if I could, what should I get therefore?
  • An if I could, what should I get therefore?
  • Hermia. I pray thee, tell me then that he is well.

    Demetrius. An if I could, what should I get therefore?

15 III / 2
  • There is no following her in this fierce vein:
    Here therefore for a while I...
  • There is no following her in this fierce vein:
    Here therefore for a while I will remain.
    So sorrow's heaviness doth heavier grow
    For debt that bankrupt sleep doth sorrow owe:
    Which now in some slight measure it will pay,
    If for his tender here I make some stay.
  • Hermia. A privilege never to see me more.
    And from thy hated presence part I so:
    See me no more, whether he be dead or no.

    Demetrius. There is no following her in this fierce vein:
    Here therefore for a while I will remain.
    So sorrow's heaviness doth heavier grow
    For debt that bankrupt sleep doth sorrow owe:
    Which now in some slight measure it will pay,
    If for his tender here I make some stay.

16 III / 2
  • [Awaking] O Helena, goddess, nymph, perfect, divine!
    To what, my love, shall...
  • [Awaking] O Helena, goddess, nymph, perfect, divine!
    To what, my love, shall I compare thine eyne?
    Crystal is muddy. O, how ripe in show
    Thy lips, those kissing cherries, tempting grow!
    That pure congealed white, high Taurus snow,
    Fann'd with the eastern wind, turns to a crow
    When thou hold'st up thy hand: O, let me kiss
    This princess of pure white, this seal of bliss!
  • Lysander. Demetrius loves her, and he loves not you.

    Demetrius. [Awaking] O Helena, goddess, nymph, perfect, divine!
    To what, my love, shall I compare thine eyne?
    Crystal is muddy. O, how ripe in show
    Thy lips, those kissing cherries, tempting grow!
    That pure congealed white, high Taurus snow,
    Fann'd with the eastern wind, turns to a crow
    When thou hold'st up thy hand: O, let me kiss
    This princess of pure white, this seal of bliss!

17 III / 2
  • Lysander, keep thy Hermia; I will none:
    If e'er I loved her, all that love i...
  • Lysander, keep thy Hermia; I will none:
    If e'er I loved her, all that love is gone.
    My heart to her but as guest-wise sojourn'd,
    And now to Helen is it home return'd,
    There to remain.
  • Helena. Never did mockers waste more idle breath.

    Demetrius. Lysander, keep thy Hermia; I will none:
    If e'er I loved her, all that love is gone.
    My heart to her but as guest-wise sojourn'd,
    And now to Helen is it home return'd,
    There to remain.

18 III / 2
  • Disparage not the faith thou dost not know,
    Lest, to thy peril, thou aby it...
  • Disparage not the faith thou dost not know,
    Lest, to thy peril, thou aby it dear.
    Look, where thy love comes; yonder is thy dear.
  • Lysander. Helen, it is not so.

    Demetrius. Disparage not the faith thou dost not know,
    Lest, to thy peril, thou aby it dear.
    Look, where thy love comes; yonder is thy dear.

19 III / 2
  • If she cannot entreat, I can compel.
  • If she cannot entreat, I can compel.
  • Hermia. Sweet, do not scorn her so.

    Demetrius. If she cannot entreat, I can compel.

20 III / 2
  • I say I love thee more than he can do.
  • I say I love thee more than he can do.
  • Lysander. Thou canst compel no more than she entreat:
    Thy threats have no more strength than her weak prayers.
    Helen, I love thee; by my life, I do:
    I swear by that which I will lose for thee,
    To prove him false that says I love thee not.

    Demetrius. I say I love thee more than he can do.

21 III / 2
  • Quick, come!
  • Quick, come!
  • Lysander. If thou say so, withdraw, and prove it too.

    Demetrius. Quick, come!

22 III / 2
  • No, no; he'll
    Seem to break loose; take on as you would follow,
    But yet...
  • No, no; he'll
    Seem to break loose; take on as you would follow,
    But yet come not: you are a tame man, go!
  • Lysander. Away, you Ethiope!

    Demetrius. No, no; he'll
    Seem to break loose; take on as you would follow,
    But yet come not: you are a tame man, go!

23 III / 2
  • I would I had your bond, for I perceive
    A weak bond holds you: I'll not trus...
  • I would I had your bond, for I perceive
    A weak bond holds you: I'll not trust your word.
  • Lysander. Demetrius, I will keep my word with thee.

    Demetrius. I would I had your bond, for I perceive
    A weak bond holds you: I'll not trust your word.

24 III / 2
  • No, sir, she shall not, though you take her part.
  • No, sir, she shall not, though you take her part.
  • Lysander. Be not afraid; she shall not harm thee, Helena.

    Demetrius. No, sir, she shall not, though you take her part.

25 III / 2
  • You are too officious
    In her behalf that scorns your services.
    Let her a...
  • You are too officious
    In her behalf that scorns your services.
    Let her alone: speak not of Helena;
    Take not her part; for, if thou dost intend
    Never so little show of love to her,
    Thou shalt aby it.
  • Lysander. Get you gone, you dwarf;
    You minimus, of hindering knot-grass made;
    You bead, you acorn.

    Demetrius. You are too officious
    In her behalf that scorns your services.
    Let her alone: speak not of Helena;
    Take not her part; for, if thou dost intend
    Never so little show of love to her,
    Thou shalt aby it.

26 III / 2
  • Follow! nay, I'll go with thee, cheek by jole.
  • Follow! nay, I'll go with thee, cheek by jole.
  • Lysander. Now she holds me not;
    Now follow, if thou darest, to try whose right,
    Of thine or mine, is most in Helena.

    Demetrius. Follow! nay, I'll go with thee, cheek by jole.

27 III / 2
  • Lysander! speak again:
    Thou runaway, thou coward, art thou fled?
    Speak!...
  • Lysander! speak again:
    Thou runaway, thou coward, art thou fled?
    Speak! In some bush? Where dost thou hide thy head?
  • Puck. Follow me, then,
    To plainer ground.

    Demetrius. Lysander! speak again:
    Thou runaway, thou coward, art thou fled?
    Speak! In some bush? Where dost thou hide thy head?

28 III / 2
  • Yea, art thou there?
  • Yea, art thou there?
  • Puck. Thou coward, art thou bragging to the stars,
    Telling the bushes that thou look'st for wars,
    And wilt not come? Come, recreant; come, thou child;
    I'll whip thee with a rod: he is defiled
    That draws a sword on thee.

    Demetrius. Yea, art thou there?

29 III / 2
  • Abide me, if thou darest; for well I wot
    Thou runn'st before me, shifting ev...
  • Abide me, if thou darest; for well I wot
    Thou runn'st before me, shifting every place,
    And darest not stand, nor look me in the face.
    Where art thou now?
  • Puck. Ho, ho, ho! Coward, why comest thou not?

    Demetrius. Abide me, if thou darest; for well I wot
    Thou runn'st before me, shifting every place,
    And darest not stand, nor look me in the face.
    Where art thou now?

30 III / 2
  • Nay, then, thou mock'st me. Thou shalt buy this dear,
    If ever I thy face by...
  • Nay, then, thou mock'st me. Thou shalt buy this dear,
    If ever I thy face by daylight see:
    Now, go thy way. Faintness constraineth me
    To measure out my length on this cold bed.
    By day's approach look to be visited.
  • Puck. Come hither: I am here.

    Demetrius. Nay, then, thou mock'st me. Thou shalt buy this dear,
    If ever I thy face by daylight see:
    Now, go thy way. Faintness constraineth me
    To measure out my length on this cold bed.
    By day's approach look to be visited.

31 IV / 1
  • My lord, fair Helen told me of their stealth,
    Of this their purpose hither t...
  • My lord, fair Helen told me of their stealth,
    Of this their purpose hither to this wood;
    And I in fury hither follow'd them,
    Fair Helena in fancy following me.
    But, my good lord, I wot not by what power,--
    But by some power it is,--my love to Hermia,
    Melted as the snow, seems to me now
    As the remembrance of an idle gaud
    Which in my childhood I did dote upon;
    And all the faith, the virtue of my heart,
    The object and the pleasure of mine eye,
    Is only Helena. To her, my lord,
    Was I betroth'd ere I saw Hermia:
    But, like in sickness, did I loathe this food;
    But, as in health, come to my natural taste,
    Now I do wish it, love it, long for it,
    And will for evermore be true to it.
  • Egeus. Enough, enough, my lord; you have enough:
    I beg the law, the law, upon his head.
    They would have stolen away; they would, Demetrius,
    Thereby to have defeated you and me,
    You of your wife and me of my consent,
    Of my consent that she should be your wife.

    Demetrius. My lord, fair Helen told me of their stealth,
    Of this their purpose hither to this wood;
    And I in fury hither follow'd them,
    Fair Helena in fancy following me.
    But, my good lord, I wot not by what power,--
    But by some power it is,--my love to Hermia,
    Melted as the snow, seems to me now
    As the remembrance of an idle gaud
    Which in my childhood I did dote upon;
    And all the faith, the virtue of my heart,
    The object and the pleasure of mine eye,
    Is only Helena. To her, my lord,
    Was I betroth'd ere I saw Hermia:
    But, like in sickness, did I loathe this food;
    But, as in health, come to my natural taste,
    Now I do wish it, love it, long for it,
    And will for evermore be true to it.

32 IV / 1
  • These things seem small and undistinguishable,
  • These things seem small and undistinguishable,
  • Theseus. Fair lovers, you are fortunately met:
    Of this discourse we more will hear anon.
    Egeus, I will overbear your will;
    For in the temple by and by with us
    These couples shall eternally be knit:
    And, for the morning now is something worn,
    Our purposed hunting shall be set aside.
    Away with us to Athens; three and three,
    We'll hold a feast in great solemnity.
    Come, Hippolyta.

    Demetrius. These things seem small and undistinguishable,

33 IV / 1
  • Are you sure
    That we are awake? It seems to me
    That yet we sleep, we dre...
  • Are you sure
    That we are awake? It seems to me
    That yet we sleep, we dream. Do not you think
    The duke was here, and bid us follow him?
  • Helena. So methinks:
    And I have found Demetrius like a jewel,
    Mine own, and not mine own.

    Demetrius. Are you sure
    That we are awake? It seems to me
    That yet we sleep, we dream. Do not you think
    The duke was here, and bid us follow him?

34 IV / 1
  • Why, then, we are awake: let's follow him
    And by the way let us recount our...
  • Why, then, we are awake: let's follow him
    And by the way let us recount our dreams.
  • Lysander. And he did bid us follow to the temple.

    Demetrius. Why, then, we are awake: let's follow him
    And by the way let us recount our dreams.

35 V / 1
  • No wonder, my lord: one lion may, when many asses do.
  • No wonder, my lord: one lion may, when many asses do.
  • Theseus. I wonder if the lion be to speak.

    Demetrius. No wonder, my lord: one lion may, when many asses do.

36 V / 1
  • It is the wittiest partition that ever I heard
    discourse, my lord.
  • It is the wittiest partition that ever I heard
    discourse, my lord.
  • Theseus. Would you desire lime and hair to speak better?

    Demetrius. It is the wittiest partition that ever I heard
    discourse, my lord.

37 V / 1
  • No remedy, my lord, when walls are so wilful to hear
    without warning.
  • No remedy, my lord, when walls are so wilful to hear
    without warning.
  • Theseus. Now is the mural down between the two neighbours.

    Demetrius. No remedy, my lord, when walls are so wilful to hear
    without warning.

38 V / 1
  • The very best at a beast, my lord, that e'er I saw.
  • The very best at a beast, my lord, that e'er I saw.
  • Theseus. A very gentle beast, of a good conscience.

    Demetrius. The very best at a beast, my lord, that e'er I saw.

39 V / 1
  • Not so, my lord; for his valour cannot carry his
    discretion; and the fox car...
  • Not so, my lord; for his valour cannot carry his
    discretion; and the fox carries the goose.
  • Theseus. True; and a goose for his discretion.

    Demetrius. Not so, my lord; for his valour cannot carry his
    discretion; and the fox carries the goose.

40 V / 1
  • He should have worn the horns on his head.
  • He should have worn the horns on his head.
  • Starveling. [as Moonshine] This lanthorn doth the horned moon present;--

    Demetrius. He should have worn the horns on his head.

41 V / 1
  • He dares not come there for the candle; for, you
    see, it is already in snuff...
  • He dares not come there for the candle; for, you
    see, it is already in snuff.
  • Theseus. This is the greatest error of all the rest: the man
    should be put into the lanthorn. How is it else the
    man i' the moon?

    Demetrius. He dares not come there for the candle; for, you
    see, it is already in snuff.

42 V / 1
  • Why, all these should be in the lanthorn; for all
    these are in the moon. But...
  • Why, all these should be in the lanthorn; for all
    these are in the moon. But, silence! here comes Thisbe.
  • Starveling. [as Moonshine] All that I have to say, is, to tell you that the
    lanthorn is the moon; I, the man in the moon; this
    thorn-bush, my thorn-bush; and this dog, my dog.

    Demetrius. Why, all these should be in the lanthorn; for all
    these are in the moon. But, silence! here comes Thisbe.

43 V / 1
  • Well roared, Lion.
  • Well roared, Lion.
  • Snug. [as Lion] [Roaring] Oh--

    Demetrius. Well roared, Lion.

44 V / 1
  • And then came Pyramus.
  • And then came Pyramus.
  • Lysander. And so the lion vanished.

    Demetrius. And then came Pyramus.

45 V / 1
  • No die, but an ace, for him; for he is but one.
  • No die, but an ace, for him; for he is but one.
  • Bottom. O wherefore, Nature, didst thou lions frame?
    Since lion vile hath here deflower'd my dear:
    Which is--no, no--which was the fairest dame
    That lived, that loved, that liked, that look'd
    with cheer.
    Come, tears, confound;
    Out, sword, and wound
    The pap of Pyramus;
    Ay, that left pap,
    Where heart doth hop:
    [Stabs himself]
    Thus die I, thus, thus, thus.
    Now am I dead,
    Now am I fled;
    My soul is in the sky:
    Tongue, lose thy light;
    Moon take thy flight:
    [Exit Moonshine]
    Now die, die, die, die, die.

    Demetrius. No die, but an ace, for him; for he is but one.

46 V / 1
  • A mote will turn the balance, which Pyramus, which
    Thisbe, is the better; he...
  • A mote will turn the balance, which Pyramus, which
    Thisbe, is the better; he for a man, God warrant us;
    she for a woman, God bless us.
  • Hippolyta. Methinks she should not use a long one for such a
    Pyramus: I hope she will be brief.

    Demetrius. A mote will turn the balance, which Pyramus, which
    Thisbe, is the better; he for a man, God warrant us;
    she for a woman, God bless us.

47 V / 1
  • And thus she means, videlicet:--
  • And thus she means, videlicet:--
  • Lysander. She hath spied him already with those sweet eyes.

    Demetrius. And thus she means, videlicet:--

48 V / 1
  • Ay, and Wall too.
  • Ay, and Wall too.
  • Theseus. Moonshine and Lion are left to bury the dead.

    Demetrius. Ay, and Wall too.

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© Copyright 2017-2021 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.