Speeches (Lines) for Desdemona in "The Tragedy of Othello; or, The Moor of Venice"

Total: 165
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 3
  • My noble father,
    I do perceive here a divided duty:
    To you I am bound fo...
  • My noble father,
    I do perceive here a divided duty:
    To you I am bound for life and education;
    My life and education both do learn me
    How to respect you; you are the lord of duty;
    I am hitherto your daughter: but here's my husband,
    And so much duty as my mother show'd
    To you, preferring you before her father,
    So much I challenge that I may profess
    Due to the Moor my lord.
  • Brabantio. I pray you, hear her speak:
    If she confess that she was half the wooer,
    Destruction on my head, if my bad blame
    Light on the man! Come hither, gentle mistress:
    Do you perceive in all this noble company
    Where most you owe obedience?

    Desdemona. My noble father,
    I do perceive here a divided duty:
    To you I am bound for life and education;
    My life and education both do learn me
    How to respect you; you are the lord of duty;
    I am hitherto your daughter: but here's my husband,
    And so much duty as my mother show'd
    To you, preferring you before her father,
    So much I challenge that I may profess
    Due to the Moor my lord.

2 I / 3
  • Nor I; I would not there reside,
    To put my father in impatient thoughts
    ...
  • Nor I; I would not there reside,
    To put my father in impatient thoughts
    By being in his eye. Most gracious duke,
    To my unfolding lend your prosperous ear;
    And let me find a charter in your voice,
    To assist my simpleness.
  • Othello. Nor I.

    Desdemona. Nor I; I would not there reside,
    To put my father in impatient thoughts
    By being in his eye. Most gracious duke,
    To my unfolding lend your prosperous ear;
    And let me find a charter in your voice,
    To assist my simpleness.

3 I / 3
  • That I did love the Moor to live with him,
    My downright violence and storm o...
  • That I did love the Moor to live with him,
    My downright violence and storm of fortunes
    May trumpet to the world: my heart's subdued
    Even to the very quality of my lord:
    I saw Othello's visage in his mind,
    And to his honour and his valiant parts
    Did I my soul and fortunes consecrate.
    So that, dear lords, if I be left behind,
    A moth of peace, and he go to the war,
    The rites for which I love him are bereft me,
    And I a heavy interim shall support
    By his dear absence. Let me go with him.
  • Duke of Venice. What would You, Desdemona?

    Desdemona. That I did love the Moor to live with him,
    My downright violence and storm of fortunes
    May trumpet to the world: my heart's subdued
    Even to the very quality of my lord:
    I saw Othello's visage in his mind,
    And to his honour and his valiant parts
    Did I my soul and fortunes consecrate.
    So that, dear lords, if I be left behind,
    A moth of peace, and he go to the war,
    The rites for which I love him are bereft me,
    And I a heavy interim shall support
    By his dear absence. Let me go with him.

4 II / 1
  • I thank you, valiant Cassio.
    What tidings can you tell me of my lord?
  • I thank you, valiant Cassio.
    What tidings can you tell me of my lord?
  • Cassio. She that I spake of, our great captain's captain,
    Left in the conduct of the bold Iago,
    Whose footing here anticipates our thoughts
    A se'nnight's speed. Great Jove, Othello guard,
    And swell his sail with thine own powerful breath,
    That he may bless this bay with his tall ship,
    Make love's quick pants in Desdemona's arms,
    Give renew'd fire to our extincted spirits
    And bring all Cyprus comfort!
    [Enter DESDEMONA, EMILIA, IAGO, RODERIGO, and Attendants]
    O, behold,
    The riches of the ship is come on shore!
    Ye men of Cyprus, let her have your knees.
    Hail to thee, lady! and the grace of heaven,
    Before, behind thee, and on every hand,
    Enwheel thee round!

    Desdemona. I thank you, valiant Cassio.
    What tidings can you tell me of my lord?

5 II / 1
  • O, but I fear--How lost you company?
  • O, but I fear--How lost you company?
  • Cassio. He is not yet arrived: nor know I aught
    But that he's well and will be shortly here.

    Desdemona. O, but I fear--How lost you company?

6 II / 1
  • Alas, she has no speech.
  • Alas, she has no speech.
  • Iago. Sir, would she give you so much of her lips
    As of her tongue she oft bestows on me,
    You'll have enough.

    Desdemona. Alas, she has no speech.

7 II / 1
  • O, fie upon thee, slanderer!
  • O, fie upon thee, slanderer!
  • Iago. Come on, come on; you are pictures out of doors,
    Bells in your parlors, wild-cats in your kitchens,
    Saints m your injuries, devils being offended,
    Players in your housewifery, and housewives' in your beds.

    Desdemona. O, fie upon thee, slanderer!

8 II / 1
  • What wouldst thou write of me, if thou shouldst
    praise me?
  • What wouldst thou write of me, if thou shouldst
    praise me?
  • Iago. No, let me not.

    Desdemona. What wouldst thou write of me, if thou shouldst
    praise me?

9 II / 1
  • Come on assay. There's one gone to the harbour?
  • Come on assay. There's one gone to the harbour?
  • Iago. O gentle lady, do not put me to't;
    For I am nothing, if not critical.

    Desdemona. Come on assay. There's one gone to the harbour?

10 II / 1
  • I am not merry; but I do beguile
    The thing I am, by seeming otherwise.
    C...
  • I am not merry; but I do beguile
    The thing I am, by seeming otherwise.
    Come, how wouldst thou praise me?
  • Iago. Ay, madam.

    Desdemona. I am not merry; but I do beguile
    The thing I am, by seeming otherwise.
    Come, how wouldst thou praise me?

11 II / 1
  • Well praised! How if she be black and witty?
  • Well praised! How if she be black and witty?
  • Iago. I am about it; but indeed my invention
    Comes from my pate as birdlime does from frize;
    It plucks out brains and all: but my Muse labours,
    And thus she is deliver'd.
    If she be fair and wise, fairness and wit,
    The one's for use, the other useth it.

    Desdemona. Well praised! How if she be black and witty?

12 II / 1
  • Worse and worse.
  • Worse and worse.
  • Iago. If she be black, and thereto have a wit,
    She'll find a white that shall her blackness fit.

    Desdemona. Worse and worse.

13 II / 1
  • These are old fond paradoxes to make fools laugh i'
    the alehouse. What miser...
  • These are old fond paradoxes to make fools laugh i'
    the alehouse. What miserable praise hast thou for
    her that's foul and foolish?
  • Iago. She never yet was foolish that was fair;
    For even her folly help'd her to an heir.

    Desdemona. These are old fond paradoxes to make fools laugh i'
    the alehouse. What miserable praise hast thou for
    her that's foul and foolish?

14 II / 1
  • O heavy ignorance! thou praisest the worst best.
    But what praise couldst tho...
  • O heavy ignorance! thou praisest the worst best.
    But what praise couldst thou bestow on a deserving
    woman indeed, one that, in the authority of her
    merit, did justly put on the vouch of very malice itself?
  • Iago. There's none so foul and foolish thereunto,
    But does foul pranks which fair and wise ones do.

    Desdemona. O heavy ignorance! thou praisest the worst best.
    But what praise couldst thou bestow on a deserving
    woman indeed, one that, in the authority of her
    merit, did justly put on the vouch of very malice itself?

15 II / 1
  • To do what?
  • To do what?
  • Iago. She that was ever fair and never proud,
    Had tongue at will and yet was never loud,
    Never lack'd gold and yet went never gay,
    Fled from her wish and yet said 'Now I may,'
    She that being anger'd, her revenge being nigh,
    Bade her wrong stay and her displeasure fly,
    She that in wisdom never was so frail
    To change the cod's head for the salmon's tail;
    She that could think and ne'er disclose her mind,
    See suitors following and not look behind,
    She was a wight, if ever such wight were,--

    Desdemona. To do what?

16 II / 1
  • O most lame and impotent conclusion! Do not learn
    of him, Emilia, though he...
  • O most lame and impotent conclusion! Do not learn
    of him, Emilia, though he be thy husband. How say
    you, Cassio? is he not a most profane and liberal
    counsellor?
  • Iago. To suckle fools and chronicle small beer.

    Desdemona. O most lame and impotent conclusion! Do not learn
    of him, Emilia, though he be thy husband. How say
    you, Cassio? is he not a most profane and liberal
    counsellor?

17 II / 1
  • Let's meet him and receive him.
  • Let's meet him and receive him.
  • Cassio. 'Tis truly so.

    Desdemona. Let's meet him and receive him.

18 II / 1
  • My dear Othello!
  • My dear Othello!
  • Othello. O my fair warrior!

    Desdemona. My dear Othello!

19 II / 1
  • The heavens forbid
    But that our loves and comforts should increase,
    Even...
  • The heavens forbid
    But that our loves and comforts should increase,
    Even as our days do grow!
  • Othello. It gives me wonder great as my content
    To see you here before me. O my soul's joy!
    If after every tempest come such calms,
    May the winds blow till they have waken'd death!
    And let the labouring bark climb hills of seas
    Olympus-high and duck again as low
    As hell's from heaven! If it were now to die,
    'Twere now to be most happy; for, I fear,
    My soul hath her content so absolute
    That not another comfort like to this
    Succeeds in unknown fate.

    Desdemona. The heavens forbid
    But that our loves and comforts should increase,
    Even as our days do grow!

20 II / 3
  • What's the matter?
  • What's the matter?
  • Othello. I know, Iago,
    Thy honesty and love doth mince this matter,
    Making it light to Cassio. Cassio, I love thee
    But never more be officer of mine.
    [Re-enter DESDEMONA, attended]
    Look, if my gentle love be not raised up!
    I'll make thee an example.

    Desdemona. What's the matter?

21 III / 3
  • Be thou assured, good Cassio, I will do
    All my abilities in thy behalf.
  • Be thou assured, good Cassio, I will do
    All my abilities in thy behalf.
  • Gentleman. We'll wait upon your lordship.

    Desdemona. Be thou assured, good Cassio, I will do
    All my abilities in thy behalf.

22 III / 3
  • O, that's an honest fellow. Do not doubt, Cassio,
    But I will have my lord an...
  • O, that's an honest fellow. Do not doubt, Cassio,
    But I will have my lord and you again
    As friendly as you were.
  • Emilia. Good madam, do: I warrant it grieves my husband,
    As if the case were his.

    Desdemona. O, that's an honest fellow. Do not doubt, Cassio,
    But I will have my lord and you again
    As friendly as you were.

23 III / 3
  • I know't; I thank you. You do love my lord:
    You have known him long; and be...
  • I know't; I thank you. You do love my lord:
    You have known him long; and be you well assured
    He shall in strangeness stand no further off
    Than in a polite distance.
  • Cassio. Bounteous madam,
    Whatever shall become of Michael Cassio,
    He's never any thing but your true servant.

    Desdemona. I know't; I thank you. You do love my lord:
    You have known him long; and be you well assured
    He shall in strangeness stand no further off
    Than in a polite distance.

24 III / 3
  • Do not doubt that; before Emilia here
    I give thee warrant of thy place: assu...
  • Do not doubt that; before Emilia here
    I give thee warrant of thy place: assure thee,
    If I do vow a friendship, I'll perform it
    To the last article: my lord shall never rest;
    I'll watch him tame and talk him out of patience;
    His bed shall seem a school, his board a shrift;
    I'll intermingle every thing he does
    With Cassio's suit: therefore be merry, Cassio;
    For thy solicitor shall rather die
    Than give thy cause away.
  • Cassio. Ay, but, lady,
    That policy may either last so long,
    Or feed upon such nice and waterish diet,
    Or breed itself so out of circumstance,
    That, I being absent and my place supplied,
    My general will forget my love and service.

    Desdemona. Do not doubt that; before Emilia here
    I give thee warrant of thy place: assure thee,
    If I do vow a friendship, I'll perform it
    To the last article: my lord shall never rest;
    I'll watch him tame and talk him out of patience;
    His bed shall seem a school, his board a shrift;
    I'll intermingle every thing he does
    With Cassio's suit: therefore be merry, Cassio;
    For thy solicitor shall rather die
    Than give thy cause away.

25 III / 3
  • Why, stay, and hear me speak.
  • Why, stay, and hear me speak.
  • Cassio. Madam, I'll take my leave.

    Desdemona. Why, stay, and hear me speak.

26 III / 3
  • Well, do your discretion.
  • Well, do your discretion.
  • Cassio. Madam, not now: I am very ill at ease,
    Unfit for mine own purposes.

    Desdemona. Well, do your discretion.

27 III / 3
  • How now, my lord!
    I have been talking with a suitor here,
    A man that lan...
  • How now, my lord!
    I have been talking with a suitor here,
    A man that languishes in your displeasure.
  • Othello. I do believe 'twas he.

    Desdemona. How now, my lord!
    I have been talking with a suitor here,
    A man that languishes in your displeasure.

28 III / 3
  • Why, your lieutenant, Cassio. Good my lord,
    If I have any grace or power to...
  • Why, your lieutenant, Cassio. Good my lord,
    If I have any grace or power to move you,
    His present reconciliation take;
    For if he be not one that truly loves you,
    That errs in ignorance and not in cunning,
    I have no judgment in an honest face:
    I prithee, call him back.
  • Othello. Who is't you mean?

    Desdemona. Why, your lieutenant, Cassio. Good my lord,
    If I have any grace or power to move you,
    His present reconciliation take;
    For if he be not one that truly loves you,
    That errs in ignorance and not in cunning,
    I have no judgment in an honest face:
    I prithee, call him back.

29 III / 3
  • Ay, sooth; so humbled
    That he hath left part of his grief with me,
    To su...
  • Ay, sooth; so humbled
    That he hath left part of his grief with me,
    To suffer with him. Good love, call him back.
  • Othello. Went he hence now?

    Desdemona. Ay, sooth; so humbled
    That he hath left part of his grief with me,
    To suffer with him. Good love, call him back.

30 III / 3
  • But shall't be shortly?
  • But shall't be shortly?
  • Othello. Not now, sweet Desdemona; some other time.

    Desdemona. But shall't be shortly?

31 III / 3
  • Shall't be to-night at supper?
  • Shall't be to-night at supper?
  • Othello. The sooner, sweet, for you.

    Desdemona. Shall't be to-night at supper?

32 III / 3
  • To-morrow dinner, then?
  • To-morrow dinner, then?
  • Othello. No, not to-night.

    Desdemona. To-morrow dinner, then?

33 III / 3
  • Why, then, to-morrow night; or Tuesday morn;
    On Tuesday noon, or night; on W...
  • Why, then, to-morrow night; or Tuesday morn;
    On Tuesday noon, or night; on Wednesday morn:
    I prithee, name the time, but let it not
    Exceed three days: in faith, he's penitent;
    And yet his trespass, in our common reason--
    Save that, they say, the wars must make examples
    Out of their best--is not almost a fault
    To incur a private cheque. When shall he come?
    Tell me, Othello: I wonder in my soul,
    What you would ask me, that I should deny,
    Or stand so mammering on. What! Michael Cassio,
    That came a-wooing with you, and so many a time,
    When I have spoke of you dispraisingly,
    Hath ta'en your part; to have so much to do
    To bring him in! Trust me, I could do much,--
  • Othello. I shall not dine at home;
    I meet the captains at the citadel.

    Desdemona. Why, then, to-morrow night; or Tuesday morn;
    On Tuesday noon, or night; on Wednesday morn:
    I prithee, name the time, but let it not
    Exceed three days: in faith, he's penitent;
    And yet his trespass, in our common reason--
    Save that, they say, the wars must make examples
    Out of their best--is not almost a fault
    To incur a private cheque. When shall he come?
    Tell me, Othello: I wonder in my soul,
    What you would ask me, that I should deny,
    Or stand so mammering on. What! Michael Cassio,
    That came a-wooing with you, and so many a time,
    When I have spoke of you dispraisingly,
    Hath ta'en your part; to have so much to do
    To bring him in! Trust me, I could do much,--

34 III / 3
  • Why, this is not a boon;
    'Tis as I should entreat you wear your gloves,
    ...
  • Why, this is not a boon;
    'Tis as I should entreat you wear your gloves,
    Or feed on nourishing dishes, or keep you warm,
    Or sue to you to do a peculiar profit
    To your own person: nay, when I have a suit
    Wherein I mean to touch your love indeed,
    It shall be full of poise and difficult weight
    And fearful to be granted.
  • Othello. Prithee, no more: let him come when he will;
    I will deny thee nothing.

    Desdemona. Why, this is not a boon;
    'Tis as I should entreat you wear your gloves,
    Or feed on nourishing dishes, or keep you warm,
    Or sue to you to do a peculiar profit
    To your own person: nay, when I have a suit
    Wherein I mean to touch your love indeed,
    It shall be full of poise and difficult weight
    And fearful to be granted.

35 III / 3
  • Shall I deny you? no: farewell, my lord.
  • Shall I deny you? no: farewell, my lord.
  • Othello. I will deny thee nothing:
    Whereon, I do beseech thee, grant me this,
    To leave me but a little to myself.

    Desdemona. Shall I deny you? no: farewell, my lord.

36 III / 3
  • Emilia, come. Be as your fancies teach you;
    Whate'er you be, I am obedient.
  • Emilia, come. Be as your fancies teach you;
    Whate'er you be, I am obedient.
  • Othello. Farewell, my Desdemona: I'll come to thee straight.

    Desdemona. Emilia, come. Be as your fancies teach you;
    Whate'er you be, I am obedient.

37 III / 3
  • How now, my dear Othello!
    Your dinner, and the generous islanders
    By you...
  • How now, my dear Othello!
    Your dinner, and the generous islanders
    By you invited, do attend your presence.
  • Othello. This fellow's of exceeding honesty,
    And knows all qualities, with a learned spirit,
    Of human dealings. If I do prove her haggard,
    Though that her jesses were my dear heartstrings,
    I'ld whistle her off and let her down the wind,
    To pray at fortune. Haply, for I am black
    And have not those soft parts of conversation
    That chamberers have, or for I am declined
    Into the vale of years,--yet that's not much--
    She's gone. I am abused; and my relief
    Must be to loathe her. O curse of marriage,
    That we can call these delicate creatures ours,
    And not their appetites! I had rather be a toad,
    And live upon the vapour of a dungeon,
    Than keep a corner in the thing I love
    For others' uses. Yet, 'tis the plague of great ones;
    Prerogatived are they less than the base;
    'Tis destiny unshunnable, like death:
    Even then this forked plague is fated to us
    When we do quicken. Desdemona comes:
    [Re-enter DESDEMONA and EMILIA]
    If she be false, O, then heaven mocks itself!
    I'll not believe't.

    Desdemona. How now, my dear Othello!
    Your dinner, and the generous islanders
    By you invited, do attend your presence.

38 III / 3
  • Why do you speak so faintly?
    Are you not well?
  • Why do you speak so faintly?
    Are you not well?
  • Othello. I am to blame.

    Desdemona. Why do you speak so faintly?
    Are you not well?

39 III / 3
  • 'Faith, that's with watching; 'twill away again:
    Let me but bind it hard, wi...
  • 'Faith, that's with watching; 'twill away again:
    Let me but bind it hard, within this hour
    It will be well.
  • Othello. I have a pain upon my forehead here.

    Desdemona. 'Faith, that's with watching; 'twill away again:
    Let me but bind it hard, within this hour
    It will be well.

40 III / 3
  • I am very sorry that you are not well.
  • I am very sorry that you are not well.
  • Othello. Your napkin is too little:
    [He puts the handkerchief from him; and it drops]
    Let it alone. Come, I'll go in with you.

    Desdemona. I am very sorry that you are not well.

41 III / 4
  • Do you know, sirrah, where Lieutenant Cassio lies?
  • Do you know, sirrah, where Lieutenant Cassio lies?
  • Iago. I am your own for ever.

    Desdemona. Do you know, sirrah, where Lieutenant Cassio lies?

42 III / 4
  • Why, man?
  • Why, man?
  • Clown. I dare not say he lies any where.

    Desdemona. Why, man?

43 III / 4
  • Go to: where lodges he?
  • Go to: where lodges he?
  • Clown. He's a soldier, and for one to say a soldier lies,
    is stabbing.

    Desdemona. Go to: where lodges he?

44 III / 4
  • Can any thing be made of this?
  • Can any thing be made of this?
  • Clown. To tell you where he lodges, is to tell you where I lie.

    Desdemona. Can any thing be made of this?

45 III / 4
  • Can you inquire him out, and be edified by report?
  • Can you inquire him out, and be edified by report?
  • Clown. I know not where he lodges, and for me to devise a
    lodging and say he lies here or he lies there, were
    to lie in mine own throat.

    Desdemona. Can you inquire him out, and be edified by report?

46 III / 4
  • Seek him, bid him come hither: tell him I have
    moved my lord on his behalf,...
  • Seek him, bid him come hither: tell him I have
    moved my lord on his behalf, and hope all will be well.
  • Clown. I will catechise the world for him; that is, make
    questions, and by them answer.

    Desdemona. Seek him, bid him come hither: tell him I have
    moved my lord on his behalf, and hope all will be well.

47 III / 4
  • Where should I lose that handkerchief, Emilia?
  • Where should I lose that handkerchief, Emilia?
  • Clown. To do this is within the compass of man's wit: and
    therefore I will attempt the doing it.

    Desdemona. Where should I lose that handkerchief, Emilia?

48 III / 4
  • Believe me, I had rather have lost my purse
    Full of crusadoes: and, but my n...
  • Believe me, I had rather have lost my purse
    Full of crusadoes: and, but my noble Moor
    Is true of mind and made of no such baseness
    As jealous creatures are, it were enough
    To put him to ill thinking.
  • Emilia. I know not, madam.

    Desdemona. Believe me, I had rather have lost my purse
    Full of crusadoes: and, but my noble Moor
    Is true of mind and made of no such baseness
    As jealous creatures are, it were enough
    To put him to ill thinking.

49 III / 4
  • Who, he? I think the sun where he was born
    Drew all such humours from him.
  • Who, he? I think the sun where he was born
    Drew all such humours from him.
  • Emilia. Is he not jealous?

    Desdemona. Who, he? I think the sun where he was born
    Drew all such humours from him.

50 III / 4
  • I will not leave him now till Cassio
    Be call'd to him.
    [Enter OTHELLO] <...
  • I will not leave him now till Cassio
    Be call'd to him.
    [Enter OTHELLO]
    How is't with you, my lord
  • Emilia. Look, where he comes.

    Desdemona. I will not leave him now till Cassio
    Be call'd to him.
    [Enter OTHELLO]
    How is't with you, my lord

51 III / 4
  • Well, my good lord.
  • Well, my good lord.
  • Othello. Well, my good lady.
    [Aside]
    O, hardness to dissemble!--
    How do you, Desdemona?

    Desdemona. Well, my good lord.

52 III / 4
  • It yet hath felt no age nor known no sorrow.
  • It yet hath felt no age nor known no sorrow.
  • Othello. Give me your hand: this hand is moist, my lady.

    Desdemona. It yet hath felt no age nor known no sorrow.

53 III / 4
  • You may, indeed, say so;
    For 'twas that hand that gave away my heart.
  • You may, indeed, say so;
    For 'twas that hand that gave away my heart.
  • Othello. This argues fruitfulness and liberal heart:
    Hot, hot, and moist: this hand of yours requires
    A sequester from liberty, fasting and prayer,
    Much castigation, exercise devout;
    For here's a young and sweating devil here,
    That commonly rebels. 'Tis a good hand,
    A frank one.

    Desdemona. You may, indeed, say so;
    For 'twas that hand that gave away my heart.

54 III / 4
  • I cannot speak of this. Come now, your promise.
  • I cannot speak of this. Come now, your promise.
  • Othello. A liberal hand: the hearts of old gave hands;
    But our new heraldry is hands, not hearts.

    Desdemona. I cannot speak of this. Come now, your promise.

55 III / 4
  • I have sent to bid Cassio come speak with you.
  • I have sent to bid Cassio come speak with you.
  • Othello. What promise, chuck?

    Desdemona. I have sent to bid Cassio come speak with you.

56 III / 4
  • Here, my lord.
  • Here, my lord.
  • Othello. I have a salt and sorry rheum offends me;
    Lend me thy handkerchief.

    Desdemona. Here, my lord.

57 III / 4
  • I have it not about me.
  • I have it not about me.
  • Othello. That which I gave you.

    Desdemona. I have it not about me.

58 III / 4
  • No, indeed, my lord.
  • No, indeed, my lord.
  • Othello. Not?

    Desdemona. No, indeed, my lord.

59 III / 4
  • Is't possible?
  • Is't possible?
  • Othello. That is a fault.
    That handkerchief
    Did an Egyptian to my mother give;
    She was a charmer, and could almost read
    The thoughts of people: she told her, while
    she kept it,
    'Twould make her amiable and subdue my father
    Entirely to her love, but if she lost it
    Or made gift of it, my father's eye
    Should hold her loathed and his spirits should hunt
    After new fancies: she, dying, gave it me;
    And bid me, when my fate would have me wive,
    To give it her. I did so: and take heed on't;
    Make it a darling like your precious eye;
    To lose't or give't away were such perdition
    As nothing else could match.

    Desdemona. Is't possible?

60 III / 4
  • Indeed! is't true?
  • Indeed! is't true?
  • Othello. 'Tis true: there's magic in the web of it:
    A sibyl, that had number'd in the world
    The sun to course two hundred compasses,
    In her prophetic fury sew'd the work;
    The worms were hallow'd that did breed the silk;
    And it was dyed in mummy which the skilful
    Conserved of maidens' hearts.

    Desdemona. Indeed! is't true?

61 III / 4
  • Then would to God that I had never seen't!
  • Then would to God that I had never seen't!
  • Othello. Most veritable; therefore look to't well.

    Desdemona. Then would to God that I had never seen't!

62 III / 4
  • Why do you speak so startingly and rash?
  • Why do you speak so startingly and rash?
  • Othello. Ha! wherefore?

    Desdemona. Why do you speak so startingly and rash?

63 III / 4
  • Heaven bless us!
  • Heaven bless us!
  • Othello. Is't lost? is't gone? speak, is it out
    o' the way?

    Desdemona. Heaven bless us!

64 III / 4
  • It is not lost; but what an if it were?
  • It is not lost; but what an if it were?
  • Othello. Say you?

    Desdemona. It is not lost; but what an if it were?

65 III / 4
  • I say, it is not lost.
  • I say, it is not lost.
  • Othello. How!

    Desdemona. I say, it is not lost.

66 III / 4
  • Why, so I can, sir, but I will not now.
    This is a trick to put me from my su...
  • Why, so I can, sir, but I will not now.
    This is a trick to put me from my suit:
    Pray you, let Cassio be received again.
  • Othello. Fetch't, let me see't.

    Desdemona. Why, so I can, sir, but I will not now.
    This is a trick to put me from my suit:
    Pray you, let Cassio be received again.

67 III / 4
  • Come, come;
    You'll never meet a more sufficient man.
  • Come, come;
    You'll never meet a more sufficient man.
  • Othello. Fetch me the handkerchief: my mind misgives.

    Desdemona. Come, come;
    You'll never meet a more sufficient man.

68 III / 4
  • I pray, talk me of Cassio.
  • I pray, talk me of Cassio.
  • Othello. The handkerchief!

    Desdemona. I pray, talk me of Cassio.

69 III / 4
  • A man that all his time
    Hath founded his good fortunes on your love,
    Sha...
  • A man that all his time
    Hath founded his good fortunes on your love,
    Shared dangers with you,--
  • Othello. The handkerchief!

    Desdemona. A man that all his time
    Hath founded his good fortunes on your love,
    Shared dangers with you,--

70 III / 4
  • In sooth, you are to blame.
  • In sooth, you are to blame.
  • Othello. The handkerchief!

    Desdemona. In sooth, you are to blame.

71 III / 4
  • I ne'er saw this before.
    Sure, there's some wonder in this handkerchief:
  • I ne'er saw this before.
    Sure, there's some wonder in this handkerchief:
    I am most unhappy in the loss of it.
  • Emilia. Is not this man jealous?

    Desdemona. I ne'er saw this before.
    Sure, there's some wonder in this handkerchief:
    I am most unhappy in the loss of it.

72 III / 4
  • How now, good Cassio! what's the news with you?
  • How now, good Cassio! what's the news with you?
  • Iago. There is no other way; 'tis she must do't:
    And, lo, the happiness! go, and importune her.

    Desdemona. How now, good Cassio! what's the news with you?

73 III / 4
  • Alas, thrice-gentle Cassio!
    My advocation is not now in tune;
    My lord is...
  • Alas, thrice-gentle Cassio!
    My advocation is not now in tune;
    My lord is not my lord; nor should I know him,
    Were he in favour as in humour alter'd.
    So help me every spirit sanctified,
    As I have spoken for you all my best
    And stood within the blank of his displeasure
    For my free speech! you must awhile be patient:
    What I can do I will; and more I will
    Than for myself I dare: let that suffice you.
  • Cassio. Madam, my former suit: I do beseech you
    That by your virtuous means I may again
    Exist, and be a member of his love
    Whom I with all the office of my heart
    Entirely honour: I would not be delay'd.
    If my offence be of such mortal kind
    That nor my service past, nor present sorrows,
    Nor purposed merit in futurity,
    Can ransom me into his love again,
    But to know so must be my benefit;
    So shall I clothe me in a forced content,
    And shut myself up in some other course,
    To fortune's alms.

    Desdemona. Alas, thrice-gentle Cassio!
    My advocation is not now in tune;
    My lord is not my lord; nor should I know him,
    Were he in favour as in humour alter'd.
    So help me every spirit sanctified,
    As I have spoken for you all my best
    And stood within the blank of his displeasure
    For my free speech! you must awhile be patient:
    What I can do I will; and more I will
    Than for myself I dare: let that suffice you.

74 III / 4
  • I prithee, do so.
    [Exit IAGO]
    Something, sure, of state,
    Either from...
  • I prithee, do so.
    [Exit IAGO]
    Something, sure, of state,
    Either from Venice, or some unhatch'd practise
    Made demonstrable here in Cyprus to him,
    Hath puddled his clear spirit: and in such cases
    Men's natures wrangle with inferior things,
    Though great ones are their object. 'Tis even so;
    For let our finger ache, and it indues
    Our other healthful members even to that sense
    Of pain: nay, we must think men are not gods,
    Nor of them look for such observances
    As fit the bridal. Beshrew me much, Emilia,
    I was, unhandsome warrior as I am,
    Arraigning his unkindness with my soul;
    But now I find I had suborn'd the witness,
    And he's indicted falsely.
  • Iago. Can he be angry? I have seen the cannon,
    When it hath blown his ranks into the air,
    And, like the devil, from his very arm
    Puff'd his own brother:--and can he be angry?
    Something of moment then: I will go meet him:
    There's matter in't indeed, if he be angry.

    Desdemona. I prithee, do so.
    [Exit IAGO]
    Something, sure, of state,
    Either from Venice, or some unhatch'd practise
    Made demonstrable here in Cyprus to him,
    Hath puddled his clear spirit: and in such cases
    Men's natures wrangle with inferior things,
    Though great ones are their object. 'Tis even so;
    For let our finger ache, and it indues
    Our other healthful members even to that sense
    Of pain: nay, we must think men are not gods,
    Nor of them look for such observances
    As fit the bridal. Beshrew me much, Emilia,
    I was, unhandsome warrior as I am,
    Arraigning his unkindness with my soul;
    But now I find I had suborn'd the witness,
    And he's indicted falsely.

75 III / 4
  • Alas the day! I never gave him cause.
  • Alas the day! I never gave him cause.
  • Emilia. Pray heaven it be state-matters, as you think,
    And no conception nor no jealous toy
    Concerning you.

    Desdemona. Alas the day! I never gave him cause.

76 III / 4
  • Heaven keep that monster from Othello's mind!
  • Heaven keep that monster from Othello's mind!
  • Emilia. But jealous souls will not be answer'd so;
    They are not ever jealous for the cause,
    But jealous for they are jealous: 'tis a monster
    Begot upon itself, born on itself.

    Desdemona. Heaven keep that monster from Othello's mind!

77 III / 4
  • I will go seek him. Cassio, walk hereabout:
    If I do find him fit, I'll move...
  • I will go seek him. Cassio, walk hereabout:
    If I do find him fit, I'll move your suit
    And seek to effect it to my uttermost.
  • Emilia. Lady, amen.

    Desdemona. I will go seek him. Cassio, walk hereabout:
    If I do find him fit, I'll move your suit
    And seek to effect it to my uttermost.

78 IV / 1
  • And what's the news, good cousin Lodovico?
  • And what's the news, good cousin Lodovico?
  • Othello. I kiss the instrument of their pleasures.

    Desdemona. And what's the news, good cousin Lodovico?

79 IV / 1
  • Cousin, there's fall'n between him and my lord
    An unkind breach: but you sha...
  • Cousin, there's fall'n between him and my lord
    An unkind breach: but you shall make all well.
  • Iago. Lives, sir.

    Desdemona. Cousin, there's fall'n between him and my lord
    An unkind breach: but you shall make all well.

80 IV / 1
  • My lord?
  • My lord?
  • Othello. Are you sure of that?

    Desdemona. My lord?

81 IV / 1
  • A most unhappy one: I would do much
    To atone them, for the love I bear to Ca...
  • A most unhappy one: I would do much
    To atone them, for the love I bear to Cassio.
  • Lodovico. He did not call; he's busy in the paper.
    Is there division 'twixt my lord and Cassio?

    Desdemona. A most unhappy one: I would do much
    To atone them, for the love I bear to Cassio.

82 IV / 1
  • My lord?
  • My lord?
  • Othello. Fire and brimstone!

    Desdemona. My lord?

83 IV / 1
  • What, is he angry?
  • What, is he angry?
  • Othello. Are you wise?

    Desdemona. What, is he angry?

84 IV / 1
  • Trust me, I am glad on't.
  • Trust me, I am glad on't.
  • Lodovico. May be the letter moved him;
    For, as I think, they do command him home,
    Deputing Cassio in his government.

    Desdemona. Trust me, I am glad on't.

85 IV / 1
  • My lord?
  • My lord?
  • Othello. Indeed!

    Desdemona. My lord?

86 IV / 1
  • Why, sweet Othello,--
  • Why, sweet Othello,--
  • Othello. I am glad to see you mad.

    Desdemona. Why, sweet Othello,--

87 IV / 1
  • I have not deserved this.
  • I have not deserved this.
  • Othello. [Striking her] Devil!

    Desdemona. I have not deserved this.

88 IV / 1
  • I will not stay to offend you.
  • I will not stay to offend you.
  • Othello. O devil, devil!
    If that the earth could teem with woman's tears,
    Each drop she falls would prove a crocodile.
    Out of my sight!

    Desdemona. I will not stay to offend you.

89 IV / 1
  • My lord?
  • My lord?
  • Othello. Mistress!

    Desdemona. My lord?

90 IV / 2
  • My lord, what is your will?
  • My lord, what is your will?
  • Othello. Bid her come hither: go.
    [Exit EMILIA]
    She says enough; yet she's a simple bawd
    That cannot say as much. This is a subtle whore,
    A closet lock and key of villanous secrets
    And yet she'll kneel and pray; I have seen her do't.

    Desdemona. My lord, what is your will?

91 IV / 2
  • What is your pleasure?
  • What is your pleasure?
  • Othello. Pray, chuck, come hither.

    Desdemona. What is your pleasure?

92 IV / 2
  • What horrible fancy's this?
  • What horrible fancy's this?
  • Othello. Let me see your eyes;
    Look in my face.

    Desdemona. What horrible fancy's this?

93 IV / 2
  • Upon my knees, what doth your speech import?
    I understand a fury in your wor...
  • Upon my knees, what doth your speech import?
    I understand a fury in your words.
    But not the words.
  • Othello. [To EMILIA] Some of your function, mistress;
    Leave procreants alone and shut the door;
    Cough, or cry 'hem,' if any body come:
    Your mystery, your mystery: nay, dispatch.

    Desdemona. Upon my knees, what doth your speech import?
    I understand a fury in your words.
    But not the words.

94 IV / 2
  • Your wife, my lord; your true
    And loyal wife.
  • Your wife, my lord; your true
    And loyal wife.
  • Othello. Why, what art thou?

    Desdemona. Your wife, my lord; your true
    And loyal wife.

95 IV / 2
  • Heaven doth truly know it.
  • Heaven doth truly know it.
  • Othello. Come, swear it, damn thyself
    Lest, being like one of heaven, the devils themselves
    Should fear to seize thee: therefore be double damn'd:
    Swear thou art honest.

    Desdemona. Heaven doth truly know it.

96 IV / 2
  • To whom, my lord? with whom? how am I false?
  • To whom, my lord? with whom? how am I false?
  • Othello. Heaven truly knows that thou art false as hell.

    Desdemona. To whom, my lord? with whom? how am I false?

97 IV / 2
  • Alas the heavy day! Why do you weep?
    Am I the motive of these tears, my lord...
  • Alas the heavy day! Why do you weep?
    Am I the motive of these tears, my lord?
    If haply you my father do suspect
    An instrument of this your calling back,
    Lay not your blame on me: If you have lost him,
    Why, I have lost him too.
  • Othello. O Desdemona! away! away! away!

    Desdemona. Alas the heavy day! Why do you weep?
    Am I the motive of these tears, my lord?
    If haply you my father do suspect
    An instrument of this your calling back,
    Lay not your blame on me: If you have lost him,
    Why, I have lost him too.

98 IV / 2
  • I hope my noble lord esteems me honest.
  • I hope my noble lord esteems me honest.
  • Othello. Had it pleased heaven
    To try me with affliction; had they rain'd
    All kinds of sores and shames on my bare head.
    Steep'd me in poverty to the very lips,
    Given to captivity me and my utmost hopes,
    I should have found in some place of my soul
    A drop of patience: but, alas, to make me
    A fixed figure for the time of scorn
    To point his slow unmoving finger at!
    Yet could I bear that too; well, very well:
    But there, where I have garner'd up my heart,
    Where either I must live, or bear no life;
    The fountain from the which my current runs,
    Or else dries up; to be discarded thence!
    Or keep it as a cistern for foul toads
    To knot and gender in! Turn thy complexion there,
    Patience, thou young and rose-lipp'd cherubin,--
    Ay, there, look grim as hell!

    Desdemona. I hope my noble lord esteems me honest.

99 IV / 2
  • Alas, what ignorant sin have I committed?
  • Alas, what ignorant sin have I committed?
  • Othello. O, ay; as summer flies are in the shambles,
    That quicken even with blowing. O thou weed,
    Who art so lovely fair and smell'st so sweet
    That the sense aches at thee, would thou hadst
    ne'er been born!

    Desdemona. Alas, what ignorant sin have I committed?

100 IV / 2
  • By heaven, you do me wrong.
  • By heaven, you do me wrong.
  • Othello. Was this fair paper, this most goodly book,
    Made to write 'whore' upon? What committed!
    Committed! O thou public commoner!
    I should make very forges of my cheeks,
    That would to cinders burn up modesty,
    Did I but speak thy deeds. What committed!
    Heaven stops the nose at it and the moon winks,
    The bawdy wind that kisses all it meets
    Is hush'd within the hollow mine of earth,
    And will not hear it. What committed!
    Impudent strumpet!

    Desdemona. By heaven, you do me wrong.

101 IV / 2
  • No, as I am a Christian:
    If to preserve this vessel for my lord
    From any...
  • No, as I am a Christian:
    If to preserve this vessel for my lord
    From any other foul unlawful touch
    Be not to be a strumpet, I am none.
  • Othello. Are you not a strumpet?

    Desdemona. No, as I am a Christian:
    If to preserve this vessel for my lord
    From any other foul unlawful touch
    Be not to be a strumpet, I am none.

102 IV / 2
  • No, as I shall be saved.
  • No, as I shall be saved.
  • Othello. What, not a whore?

    Desdemona. No, as I shall be saved.

103 IV / 2
  • O, heaven forgive us!
  • O, heaven forgive us!
  • Othello. Is't possible?

    Desdemona. O, heaven forgive us!

104 IV / 2
  • 'Faith, half asleep.
  • 'Faith, half asleep.
  • Emilia. Alas, what does this gentleman conceive?
    How do you, madam? how do you, my good lady?

    Desdemona. 'Faith, half asleep.

105 IV / 2
  • With who?
  • With who?
  • Emilia. Good madam, what's the matter with my lord?

    Desdemona. With who?

106 IV / 2
  • Who is thy lord?
  • Who is thy lord?
  • Emilia. Why, with my lord, madam.

    Desdemona. Who is thy lord?

107 IV / 2
  • I have none: do not talk to me, Emilia;
    I cannot weep; nor answer have I non...
  • I have none: do not talk to me, Emilia;
    I cannot weep; nor answer have I none,
    But what should go by water. Prithee, tonight
    Lay on my bed my wedding sheets: remember;
    And call thy husband hither.
  • Emilia. He that is yours, sweet lady.

    Desdemona. I have none: do not talk to me, Emilia;
    I cannot weep; nor answer have I none,
    But what should go by water. Prithee, tonight
    Lay on my bed my wedding sheets: remember;
    And call thy husband hither.

108 IV / 2
  • 'Tis meet I should be used so, very meet.
    How have I been behaved, that he m...
  • 'Tis meet I should be used so, very meet.
    How have I been behaved, that he might stick
    The small'st opinion on my least misuse?
  • Emilia. Here's a change indeed!

    Desdemona. 'Tis meet I should be used so, very meet.
    How have I been behaved, that he might stick
    The small'st opinion on my least misuse?

109 IV / 2
  • I cannot tell. Those that do teach young babes
    Do it with gentle means and e...
  • I cannot tell. Those that do teach young babes
    Do it with gentle means and easy tasks:
    He might have chid me so; for, in good faith,
    I am a child to chiding.
  • Iago. What is your pleasure, madam?
    How is't with you?

    Desdemona. I cannot tell. Those that do teach young babes
    Do it with gentle means and easy tasks:
    He might have chid me so; for, in good faith,
    I am a child to chiding.

110 IV / 2
  • Am I that name, Iago?
  • Am I that name, Iago?
  • Emilia. Alas, Iago, my lord hath so bewhored her.
    Thrown such despite and heavy terms upon her,
    As true hearts cannot bear.

    Desdemona. Am I that name, Iago?

111 IV / 2
  • Such as she says my lord did say I was.
  • Such as she says my lord did say I was.
  • Iago. What name, fair lady?

    Desdemona. Such as she says my lord did say I was.

112 IV / 2
  • I do not know; I am sure I am none such.
  • I do not know; I am sure I am none such.
  • Iago. Why did he so?

    Desdemona. I do not know; I am sure I am none such.

113 IV / 2
  • It is my wretched fortune.
  • It is my wretched fortune.
  • Emilia. Hath she forsook so many noble matches,
    Her father and her country and her friends,
    To be call'd whore? would it not make one weep?

    Desdemona. It is my wretched fortune.

114 IV / 2
  • Nay, heaven doth know.
  • Nay, heaven doth know.
  • Iago. Beshrew him for't!
    How comes this trick upon him?

    Desdemona. Nay, heaven doth know.

115 IV / 2
  • If any such there be, heaven pardon him!
  • If any such there be, heaven pardon him!
  • Iago. Fie, there is no such man; it is impossible.

    Desdemona. If any such there be, heaven pardon him!

116 IV / 2
  • O good Iago,
    What shall I do to win my lord again?
    Good friend, go to hi...
  • O good Iago,
    What shall I do to win my lord again?
    Good friend, go to him; for, by this light of heaven,
    I know not how I lost him. Here I kneel:
    If e'er my will did trespass 'gainst his love,
    Either in discourse of thought or actual deed,
    Or that mine eyes, mine ears, or any sense,
    Delighted them in any other form;
    Or that I do not yet, and ever did.
    And ever will--though he do shake me off
    To beggarly divorcement--love him dearly,
    Comfort forswear me! Unkindness may do much;
    And his unkindness may defeat my life,
    But never taint my love. I cannot say 'whore:'
    It does abhor me now I speak the word;
    To do the act that might the addition earn
    Not the world's mass of vanity could make me.
  • Iago. You are a fool; go to.

    Desdemona. O good Iago,
    What shall I do to win my lord again?
    Good friend, go to him; for, by this light of heaven,
    I know not how I lost him. Here I kneel:
    If e'er my will did trespass 'gainst his love,
    Either in discourse of thought or actual deed,
    Or that mine eyes, mine ears, or any sense,
    Delighted them in any other form;
    Or that I do not yet, and ever did.
    And ever will--though he do shake me off
    To beggarly divorcement--love him dearly,
    Comfort forswear me! Unkindness may do much;
    And his unkindness may defeat my life,
    But never taint my love. I cannot say 'whore:'
    It does abhor me now I speak the word;
    To do the act that might the addition earn
    Not the world's mass of vanity could make me.

117 IV / 2
  • If 'twere no other--
  • If 'twere no other--
  • Iago. I pray you, be content; 'tis but his humour:
    The business of the state does him offence,
    And he does chide with you.

    Desdemona. If 'twere no other--

118 IV / 3
  • Your honour is most welcome.
  • Your honour is most welcome.
  • Lodovico. Madam, good night; I humbly thank your ladyship.

    Desdemona. Your honour is most welcome.

119 IV / 3
  • My lord?
  • My lord?
  • Othello. Will you walk, sir?
    O,--Desdemona,--

    Desdemona. My lord?

120 IV / 3
  • I will, my lord.
  • I will, my lord.
  • Othello. Get you to bed on the instant; I will be returned
    forthwith: dismiss your attendant there: look it be done.

    Desdemona. I will, my lord.

121 IV / 3
  • He says he will return incontinent:
    He hath commanded me to go to bed,
    A...
  • He says he will return incontinent:
    He hath commanded me to go to bed,
    And bade me to dismiss you.
  • Emilia. How goes it now? he looks gentler than he did.

    Desdemona. He says he will return incontinent:
    He hath commanded me to go to bed,
    And bade me to dismiss you.

122 IV / 3
  • It was his bidding: therefore, good Emilia,.
    Give me my nightly wearing, and...
  • It was his bidding: therefore, good Emilia,.
    Give me my nightly wearing, and adieu:
    We must not now displease him.
  • Emilia. Dismiss me!

    Desdemona. It was his bidding: therefore, good Emilia,.
    Give me my nightly wearing, and adieu:
    We must not now displease him.

123 IV / 3
  • So would not I. my love doth so approve him,
    That even his stubbornness, his...
  • So would not I. my love doth so approve him,
    That even his stubbornness, his cheques, his frowns--
    Prithee, unpin me,--have grace and favour in them.
  • Emilia. I would you had never seen him!

    Desdemona. So would not I. my love doth so approve him,
    That even his stubbornness, his cheques, his frowns--
    Prithee, unpin me,--have grace and favour in them.

124 IV / 3
  • All's one. Good faith, how foolish are our minds!
    If I do die before thee pr...
  • All's one. Good faith, how foolish are our minds!
    If I do die before thee prithee, shroud me
    In one of those same sheets.
  • Emilia. I have laid those sheets you bade me on the bed.

    Desdemona. All's one. Good faith, how foolish are our minds!
    If I do die before thee prithee, shroud me
    In one of those same sheets.

125 IV / 3
  • My mother had a maid call'd Barbara:
    She was in love, and he she loved prove...
  • My mother had a maid call'd Barbara:
    She was in love, and he she loved proved mad
    And did forsake her: she had a song of 'willow;'
    An old thing 'twas, but it express'd her fortune,
    And she died singing it: that song to-night
    Will not go from my mind; I have much to do,
    But to go hang my head all at one side,
    And sing it like poor Barbara. Prithee, dispatch.
  • Emilia. Come, come you talk.

    Desdemona. My mother had a maid call'd Barbara:
    She was in love, and he she loved proved mad
    And did forsake her: she had a song of 'willow;'
    An old thing 'twas, but it express'd her fortune,
    And she died singing it: that song to-night
    Will not go from my mind; I have much to do,
    But to go hang my head all at one side,
    And sing it like poor Barbara. Prithee, dispatch.

126 IV / 3
  • No, unpin me here.
    This Lodovico is a proper man.
  • No, unpin me here.
    This Lodovico is a proper man.
  • Emilia. Shall I go fetch your night-gown?

    Desdemona. No, unpin me here.
    This Lodovico is a proper man.

127 IV / 3
  • He speaks well.
  • He speaks well.
  • Emilia. A very handsome man.

    Desdemona. He speaks well.

128 IV / 3
  • [Singing] The poor soul sat sighing by a sycamore tree,
    Sing all a green wil...
  • [Singing] The poor soul sat sighing by a sycamore tree,
    Sing all a green willow:
    Her hand on her bosom, her head on her knee,
    Sing willow, willow, willow:
    The fresh streams ran by her, and murmur'd her moans;
    Sing willow, willow, willow;
    Her salt tears fell from her, and soften'd the stones;
    Lay by these:--
    [Singing]
    Sing willow, willow, willow;
    Prithee, hie thee; he'll come anon:--
    [Singing]
    Sing all a green willow must be my garland.
    Let nobody blame him; his scorn I approve,-
    Nay, that's not next.--Hark! who is't that knocks?
  • Emilia. I know a lady in Venice would have walked barefoot
    to Palestine for a touch of his nether lip.

    Desdemona. [Singing] The poor soul sat sighing by a sycamore tree,
    Sing all a green willow:
    Her hand on her bosom, her head on her knee,
    Sing willow, willow, willow:
    The fresh streams ran by her, and murmur'd her moans;
    Sing willow, willow, willow;
    Her salt tears fell from her, and soften'd the stones;
    Lay by these:--
    [Singing]
    Sing willow, willow, willow;
    Prithee, hie thee; he'll come anon:--
    [Singing]
    Sing all a green willow must be my garland.
    Let nobody blame him; his scorn I approve,-
    Nay, that's not next.--Hark! who is't that knocks?

129 IV / 3
  • [Singing] I call'd my love false love; but what
    said he then?
    Sing willo...
  • [Singing] I call'd my love false love; but what
    said he then?
    Sing willow, willow, willow:
    If I court moe women, you'll couch with moe men!
    So, get thee gone; good night Ate eyes do itch;
    Doth that bode weeping?
  • Emilia. It's the wind.

    Desdemona. [Singing] I call'd my love false love; but what
    said he then?
    Sing willow, willow, willow:
    If I court moe women, you'll couch with moe men!
    So, get thee gone; good night Ate eyes do itch;
    Doth that bode weeping?

130 IV / 3
  • I have heard it said so. O, these men, these men!
    Dost thou in conscience th...
  • I have heard it said so. O, these men, these men!
    Dost thou in conscience think,--tell me, Emilia,--
    That there be women do abuse their husbands
    In such gross kind?
  • Emilia. 'Tis neither here nor there.

    Desdemona. I have heard it said so. O, these men, these men!
    Dost thou in conscience think,--tell me, Emilia,--
    That there be women do abuse their husbands
    In such gross kind?

131 IV / 3
  • Wouldst thou do such a deed for all the world?
  • Wouldst thou do such a deed for all the world?
  • Emilia. There be some such, no question.

    Desdemona. Wouldst thou do such a deed for all the world?

132 IV / 3
  • No, by this heavenly light!
  • No, by this heavenly light!
  • Emilia. Why, would not you?

    Desdemona. No, by this heavenly light!

133 IV / 3
  • Wouldst thou do such a deed for all the world?
  • Wouldst thou do such a deed for all the world?
  • Emilia. Nor I neither by this heavenly light;
    I might do't as well i' the dark.

    Desdemona. Wouldst thou do such a deed for all the world?

134 IV / 3
  • In troth, I think thou wouldst not.
  • In troth, I think thou wouldst not.
  • Emilia. The world's a huge thing: it is a great price.
    For a small vice.

    Desdemona. In troth, I think thou wouldst not.

135 IV / 3
  • Beshrew me, if I would do such a wrong
    For the whole world.
  • Beshrew me, if I would do such a wrong
    For the whole world.
  • Emilia. In troth, I think I should; and undo't when I had
    done. Marry, I would not do such a thing for a
    joint-ring, nor for measures of lawn, nor for
    gowns, petticoats, nor caps, nor any petty
    exhibition; but for the whole world,--why, who would
    not make her husband a cuckold to make him a
    monarch? I should venture purgatory for't.

    Desdemona. Beshrew me, if I would do such a wrong
    For the whole world.

136 IV / 3
  • I do not think there is any such woman.
  • I do not think there is any such woman.
  • Emilia. Why the wrong is but a wrong i' the world: and
    having the world for your labour, tis a wrong in your
    own world, and you might quickly make it right.

    Desdemona. I do not think there is any such woman.

137 IV / 3
  • Good night, good night: heaven me such uses send,
    Not to pick bad from bad,...
  • Good night, good night: heaven me such uses send,
    Not to pick bad from bad, but by bad mend!
  • Emilia. Yes, a dozen; and as many to the vantage as would
    store the world they played for.
    But I do think it is their husbands' faults
    If wives do fall: say that they slack their duties,
    And pour our treasures into foreign laps,
    Or else break out in peevish jealousies,
    Throwing restraint upon us; or say they strike us,
    Or scant our former having in despite;
    Why, we have galls, and though we have some grace,
    Yet have we some revenge. Let husbands know
    Their wives have sense like them: they see and smell
    And have their palates both for sweet and sour,
    As husbands have. What is it that they do
    When they change us for others? Is it sport?
    I think it is: and doth affection breed it?
    I think it doth: is't frailty that thus errs?
    It is so too: and have not we affections,
    Desires for sport, and frailty, as men have?
    Then let them use us well: else let them know,
    The ills we do, their ills instruct us so.

    Desdemona. Good night, good night: heaven me such uses send,
    Not to pick bad from bad, but by bad mend!

138 V / 2
  • Who's there? Othello?
  • Who's there? Othello?
  • Othello. It is the cause, it is the cause, my soul,--
    Let me not name it to you, you chaste stars!--
    It is the cause. Yet I'll not shed her blood;
    Nor scar that whiter skin of hers than snow,
    And smooth as monumental alabaster.
    Yet she must die, else she'll betray more men.
    Put out the light, and then put out the light:
    If I quench thee, thou flaming minister,
    I can again thy former light restore,
    Should I repent me: but once put out thy light,
    Thou cunning'st pattern of excelling nature,
    I know not where is that Promethean heat
    That can thy light relume. When I have pluck'd the rose,
    I cannot give it vital growth again.
    It must needs wither: I'll smell it on the tree.
    [Kissing her]
    Ah balmy breath, that dost almost persuade
    Justice to break her sword! One more, one more.
    Be thus when thou art dead, and I will kill thee,
    And love thee after. One more, and this the last:
    So sweet was ne'er so fatal. I must weep,
    But they are cruel tears: this sorrow's heavenly;
    It strikes where it doth love. She wakes.

    Desdemona. Who's there? Othello?

139 V / 2
  • Will you come to bed, my lord?
  • Will you come to bed, my lord?
  • Othello. Ay. Desdemona.

    Desdemona. Will you come to bed, my lord?

140 V / 2
  • Ay, my lord.
  • Ay, my lord.
  • Othello. Have you pray'd to-night, Desdemona?

    Desdemona. Ay, my lord.

141 V / 2
  • Alas, my lord, what do you mean by that?
  • Alas, my lord, what do you mean by that?
  • Othello. If you bethink yourself of any crime
    Unreconciled as yet to heaven and grace,
    Solicit for it straight.

    Desdemona. Alas, my lord, what do you mean by that?

142 V / 2
  • Talk you of killing?
  • Talk you of killing?
  • Othello. Well, do it, and be brief; I will walk by:
    I would not kill thy unprepared spirit;
    No; heaven forfend! I would not kill thy soul.

    Desdemona. Talk you of killing?

143 V / 2
  • Then heaven
    Have mercy on me!
  • Then heaven
    Have mercy on me!
  • Othello. Ay, I do.

    Desdemona. Then heaven
    Have mercy on me!

144 V / 2
  • If you say so, I hope you will not kill me.
  • If you say so, I hope you will not kill me.
  • Othello. Amen, with all my heart!

    Desdemona. If you say so, I hope you will not kill me.

145 V / 2
  • And yet I fear you; for you are fatal then
    When your eyes roll so: why I sho...
  • And yet I fear you; for you are fatal then
    When your eyes roll so: why I should fear I know not,
    Since guiltiness I know not; but yet I feel I fear.
  • Othello. Hum!

    Desdemona. And yet I fear you; for you are fatal then
    When your eyes roll so: why I should fear I know not,
    Since guiltiness I know not; but yet I feel I fear.

146 V / 2
  • They are loves I bear to you.
  • They are loves I bear to you.
  • Othello. Think on thy sins.

    Desdemona. They are loves I bear to you.

147 V / 2
  • That death's unnatural that kills for loving.
    Alas, why gnaw you so your net...
  • That death's unnatural that kills for loving.
    Alas, why gnaw you so your nether lip?
    Some bloody passion shakes your very frame:
    These are portents; but yet I hope, I hope,
    They do not point on me.
  • Othello. Ay, and for that thou diest.

    Desdemona. That death's unnatural that kills for loving.
    Alas, why gnaw you so your nether lip?
    Some bloody passion shakes your very frame:
    These are portents; but yet I hope, I hope,
    They do not point on me.

148 V / 2
  • I will so. What's the matter?
  • I will so. What's the matter?
  • Othello. Peace, and be still!

    Desdemona. I will so. What's the matter?

149 V / 2
  • No, by my life and soul!
    Send for the man, and ask him.
  • No, by my life and soul!
    Send for the man, and ask him.
  • Othello. That handkerchief which I so loved and gave thee
    Thou gavest to Cassio.

    Desdemona. No, by my life and soul!
    Send for the man, and ask him.

150 V / 2
  • Ay, but not yet to die.
  • Ay, but not yet to die.
  • Othello. Sweet soul, take heed,
    Take heed of perjury; thou art on thy deathbed.

    Desdemona. Ay, but not yet to die.

151 V / 2
  • Then Lord have mercy on me!
  • Then Lord have mercy on me!
  • Othello. Yes, presently:
    Therefore confess thee freely of thy sin;
    For to deny each article with oath
    Cannot remove nor choke the strong conception
    That I do groan withal. Thou art to die.

    Desdemona. Then Lord have mercy on me!

152 V / 2
  • And have you mercy too! I never did
    Offend you in my life; never loved Cassi...
  • And have you mercy too! I never did
    Offend you in my life; never loved Cassio
    But with such general warranty of heaven
    As I might love: I never gave him token.
  • Othello. I say, amen.

    Desdemona. And have you mercy too! I never did
    Offend you in my life; never loved Cassio
    But with such general warranty of heaven
    As I might love: I never gave him token.

153 V / 2
  • He found it then;
    I never gave it him: send for him hither;
    Let him conf...
  • He found it then;
    I never gave it him: send for him hither;
    Let him confess a truth.
  • Othello. By heaven, I saw my handkerchief in's hand.
    O perjured woman! thou dost stone my heart,
    And makest me call what I intend to do
    A murder, which I thought a sacrifice:
    I saw the handkerchief.

    Desdemona. He found it then;
    I never gave it him: send for him hither;
    Let him confess a truth.

154 V / 2
  • What, my lord?
  • What, my lord?
  • Othello. He hath confess'd.

    Desdemona. What, my lord?

155 V / 2
  • How? unlawfully?
  • How? unlawfully?
  • Othello. That he hath used thee.

    Desdemona. How? unlawfully?

156 V / 2
  • He will not say so.
  • He will not say so.
  • Othello. Ay.

    Desdemona. He will not say so.

157 V / 2
  • O! my fear interprets: what, is he dead?
  • O! my fear interprets: what, is he dead?
  • Othello. No, his mouth is stopp'd;
    Honest Iago hath ta'en order for't.

    Desdemona. O! my fear interprets: what, is he dead?

158 V / 2
  • Alas! he is betray'd and I undone.
  • Alas! he is betray'd and I undone.
  • Othello. Had all his hairs been lives, my great revenge
    Had stomach for them all.

    Desdemona. Alas! he is betray'd and I undone.

159 V / 2
  • O, banish me, my lord, but kill me not!
  • O, banish me, my lord, but kill me not!
  • Othello. Out, strumpet! weep'st thou for him to my face?

    Desdemona. O, banish me, my lord, but kill me not!

160 V / 2
  • Kill me to-morrow: let me live to-night!
  • Kill me to-morrow: let me live to-night!
  • Othello. Down, strumpet!

    Desdemona. Kill me to-morrow: let me live to-night!

161 V / 2
  • But half an hour!
  • But half an hour!
  • Othello. Nay, if you strive--

    Desdemona. But half an hour!

162 V / 2
  • But while I say one prayer!
  • But while I say one prayer!
  • Othello. Being done, there is no pause.

    Desdemona. But while I say one prayer!

163 V / 2
  • O, falsely, falsely murder'd!
  • O, falsely, falsely murder'd!
  • Othello. Not Cassio kill'd! then murder's out of tune,
    And sweet revenge grows harsh.

    Desdemona. O, falsely, falsely murder'd!

164 V / 2
  • A guiltless death I die.
  • A guiltless death I die.
  • Emilia. Out, and alas! that was my lady's voice.
    Help! help, ho! help! O lady, speak again!
    Sweet Desdemona! O sweet mistress, speak!

    Desdemona. A guiltless death I die.

165 V / 2
  • Nobody; I myself. Farewell
    Commend me to my kind lord: O, farewell!
  • Nobody; I myself. Farewell
    Commend me to my kind lord: O, farewell!
  • Emilia. O, who hath done this deed?

    Desdemona. Nobody; I myself. Farewell
    Commend me to my kind lord: O, farewell!

© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.