Speeches (Lines) for Doctor in "The Tragedy of King Lear"

Total: 8
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 IV / 4
  • There is means, madam.
    Our foster nurse of nature is repose,
    The which h...
  • There is means, madam.
    Our foster nurse of nature is repose,
    The which he lacks. That to provoke in him
    Are many simples operative, whose power
    Will close the eye of anguish.
  • Cordelia. Alack, 'tis he! Why, he was met even now
    As mad as the vex'd sea, singing aloud,
    Crown'd with rank fumiter and furrow weeds,
    With harlocks, hemlock, nettles, cuckoo flow'rs,
    Darnel, and all the idle weeds that grow
    In our sustaining corn. A century send forth.
    Search every acre in the high-grown field
    And bring him to our eye. [Exit an Officer.] What can man's
    wisdom
    In the restoring his bereaved sense?
    He that helps him take all my outward worth.

    Doctor. There is means, madam.
    Our foster nurse of nature is repose,
    The which he lacks. That to provoke in him
    Are many simples operative, whose power
    Will close the eye of anguish.

2 IV / 7
  • Madam, sleeps still.
  • Madam, sleeps still.
  • Cordelia. Then be't so, my good lord. [To the Doctor] How, does the King?

    Doctor. Madam, sleeps still.

3 IV / 7
  • So please your Majesty
    That we may wake the King? He hath slept long.
  • So please your Majesty
    That we may wake the King? He hath slept long.
  • Cordelia. O you kind gods,
    Cure this great breach in his abused nature!
    Th' untun'd and jarring senses, O, wind up
    Of this child-changed father!

    Doctor. So please your Majesty
    That we may wake the King? He hath slept long.

4 IV / 7
  • Be by, good madam, when we do awake him.
    I doubt not of his temperance.
  • Be by, good madam, when we do awake him.
    I doubt not of his temperance.
  • Gentleman. Ay, madam. In the heaviness of sleep
    We put fresh garments on him.

    Doctor. Be by, good madam, when we do awake him.
    I doubt not of his temperance.

5 IV / 7
  • Please you draw near. Louder the music there!
  • Please you draw near. Louder the music there!
  • Cordelia. Very well.

    Doctor. Please you draw near. Louder the music there!

6 IV / 7
  • Madam, do you; 'tis fittest.
  • Madam, do you; 'tis fittest.
  • Cordelia. Had you not been their father, these white flakes
    Had challeng'd pity of them. Was this a face
    To be oppos'd against the warring winds?
    To stand against the deep dread-bolted thunder?
    In the most terrible and nimble stroke
    Of quick cross lightning? to watch- poor perdu!-
    With this thin helm? Mine enemy's dog,
    Though he had bit me, should have stood that night
    Against my fire; and wast thou fain, poor father,
    To hovel thee with swine and rogues forlorn,
    In short and musty straw? Alack, alack!
    'Tis wonder that thy life and wits at once
    Had not concluded all.- He wakes. Speak to him.

    Doctor. Madam, do you; 'tis fittest.

7 IV / 7
  • He's scarce awake. Let him alone awhile.
  • He's scarce awake. Let him alone awhile.
  • Cordelia. Still, still, far wide!

    Doctor. He's scarce awake. Let him alone awhile.

8 IV / 7
  • Be comforted, good madam. The great rage
    You see is kill'd in him; and yet i...
  • Be comforted, good madam. The great rage
    You see is kill'd in him; and yet it is danger
    To make him even o'er the time he has lost.
    Desire him to go in. Trouble him no more
    Till further settling.
  • Lear. Do not abuse me.

    Doctor. Be comforted, good madam. The great rage
    You see is kill'd in him; and yet it is danger
    To make him even o'er the time he has lost.
    Desire him to go in. Trouble him no more
    Till further settling.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.