Speeches (Lines) for Dull in "Love's Labour's Lost"

Total: 15
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# Act, Scene, Line Speech text
1 I, 1, 187
  • Which is the duke's own person?
  • Which is the duke's own person?
  • (stage directions). [Enter DULL with a letter, and COSTARD]

    Dull. Which is the duke's own person?

2 I, 1, 189
  • I myself reprehend his own person, for I am his
    grace's tharborough: but I w...
  • I myself reprehend his own person, for I am his
    grace's tharborough: but I would see his own person
    in flesh and blood.
  • Biron. This, fellow: what wouldst?

    Dull. I myself reprehend his own person, for I am his
    grace's tharborough: but I would see his own person
    in flesh and blood.

3 I, 1, 193
  • Signior Arme--Arme--commends you. There's villany
    abroad: this letter will t...
  • Signior Arme--Arme--commends you. There's villany
    abroad: this letter will tell you more.
  • Biron. This is he.

    Dull. Signior Arme--Arme--commends you. There's villany
    abroad: this letter will tell you more.

4 I, 1, 267
  • 'Me, an't shall please you; I am Anthony Dull.
  • 'Me, an't shall please you; I am Anthony Dull.
  • Ferdinand. [Reads] 'with a child of our grandmother Eve, a
    female; or, for thy more sweet understanding, a
    woman. Him I, as my ever-esteemed duty pricks me on,
    have sent to thee, to receive the meed of
    punishment, by thy sweet grace's officer, Anthony
    Dull; a man of good repute, carriage, bearing, and
    estimation.'

    Dull. 'Me, an't shall please you; I am Anthony Dull.

5 I, 2, 424
  • Sir, the duke's pleasure is, that you keep Costard
    safe: and you must suffer...
  • Sir, the duke's pleasure is, that you keep Costard
    safe: and you must suffer him to take no delight
    nor no penance; but a' must fast three days a week.
    For this damsel, I must keep her at the park: she
    is allowed for the day-woman. Fare you well.
  • (stage directions). [Enter DULL, COSTARD, and JAQUENETTA]

    Dull. Sir, the duke's pleasure is, that you keep Costard
    safe: and you must suffer him to take no delight
    nor no penance; but a' must fast three days a week.
    For this damsel, I must keep her at the park: she
    is allowed for the day-woman. Fare you well.

6 I, 2, 441
  • Come, Jaquenetta, away!
  • Come, Jaquenetta, away!
  • Jaquenetta. Fair weather after you!

    Dull. Come, Jaquenetta, away!

7 IV, 2, 1153
  • 'Twas not a haud credo; 'twas a pricket.
  • 'Twas not a haud credo; 'twas a pricket.
  • Holofernes. Sir Nathaniel, haud credo.

    Dull. 'Twas not a haud credo; 'twas a pricket.

8 IV, 2, 1162
  • I said the deer was not a haud credo; twas a pricket.
  • I said the deer was not a haud credo; twas a pricket.
  • Holofernes. Most barbarous intimation! yet a kind of
    insinuation, as it were, in via, in way, of
    explication; facere, as it were, replication, or
    rather, ostentare, to show, as it were, his
    inclination, after his undressed, unpolished,
    uneducated, unpruned, untrained, or rather,
    unlettered, or ratherest, unconfirmed fashion, to
    insert again my haud credo for a deer.

    Dull. I said the deer was not a haud credo; twas a pricket.

9 IV, 2, 1178
  • You two are book-men: can you tell me by your wit
    What was a month old at Ca...
  • You two are book-men: can you tell me by your wit
    What was a month old at Cain's birth, that's not five
    weeks old as yet?
  • Sir Nathaniel. Sir, he hath never fed of the dainties that are bred
    in a book; he hath not eat paper, as it were; he
    hath not drunk ink: his intellect is not
    replenished; he is only an animal, only sensible in
    the duller parts:
    And such barren plants are set before us, that we
    thankful should be,
    Which we of taste and feeling are, for those parts that
    do fructify in us more than he.
    For as it would ill become me to be vain, indiscreet, or a fool,
    So were there a patch set on learning, to see him in a school:
    But omne bene, say I; being of an old father's mind,
    Many can brook the weather that love not the wind.

    Dull. You two are book-men: can you tell me by your wit
    What was a month old at Cain's birth, that's not five
    weeks old as yet?

10 IV, 2, 1182
  • What is Dictynna?
  • What is Dictynna?
  • Holofernes. Dictynna, goodman Dull; Dictynna, goodman Dull.

    Dull. What is Dictynna?

11 IV, 2, 1188
  • 'Tis true indeed; the collusion holds in the exchange.
  • 'Tis true indeed; the collusion holds in the exchange.
  • Holofernes. The moon was a month old when Adam was no more,
    And raught not to five weeks when he came to
    five-score.
    The allusion holds in the exchange.

    Dull. 'Tis true indeed; the collusion holds in the exchange.

12 IV, 2, 1191
  • And I say, the pollusion holds in the exchange; for
    the moon is never but a...
  • And I say, the pollusion holds in the exchange; for
    the moon is never but a month old: and I say beside
    that, 'twas a pricket that the princess killed.
  • Holofernes. God comfort thy capacity! I say, the allusion holds
    in the exchange.

    Dull. And I say, the pollusion holds in the exchange; for
    the moon is never but a month old: and I say beside
    that, 'twas a pricket that the princess killed.

13 IV, 2, 1211
  • [Aside] If a talent be a claw, look how he claws
    him with a talent.
  • [Aside] If a talent be a claw, look how he claws
    him with a talent.
  • Sir Nathaniel. A rare talent!

    Dull. [Aside] If a talent be a claw, look how he claws
    him with a talent.

14 V, 1, 1874
  • Nor understood none neither, sir.
  • Nor understood none neither, sir.
  • Holofernes. Via, goodman Dull! thou hast spoken no word all this while.

    Dull. Nor understood none neither, sir.

15 V, 1, 1876
  • I'll make one in a dance, or so; or I will play
    On the tabour to the Worthie...
  • I'll make one in a dance, or so; or I will play
    On the tabour to the Worthies, and let them dance the hay.
  • Holofernes. Allons! we will employ thee.

    Dull. I'll make one in a dance, or so; or I will play
    On the tabour to the Worthies, and let them dance the hay.

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© Copyright 2017-2020 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.