Speeches (Lines) for EROS in "Antony and Cleopatra"

Total: 27
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 III / 5
  • There's strange news come, sir.
  • There's strange news come, sir.
  • DOMITIUS ENOBARBUS. How now, friend Eros!

    EROS. There's strange news come, sir.

2 III / 5
  • Caesar and Lepidus have made wars upon Pompey.
  • Caesar and Lepidus have made wars upon Pompey.
  • DOMITIUS ENOBARBUS. What, man?

    EROS. Caesar and Lepidus have made wars upon Pompey.

3 III / 5
  • Caesar, having made use of him in the wars 'gainst
    Pompey, presently denied...
  • Caesar, having made use of him in the wars 'gainst
    Pompey, presently denied him rivality; would not let
    him partake in the glory of the action: and not
    resting here, accuses him of letters he had formerly
    wrote to Pompey; upon his own appeal, seizes him: so
    the poor third is up, till death enlarge his confine.
  • DOMITIUS ENOBARBUS. This is old: what is the success?

    EROS. Caesar, having made use of him in the wars 'gainst
    Pompey, presently denied him rivality; would not let
    him partake in the glory of the action: and not
    resting here, accuses him of letters he had formerly
    wrote to Pompey; upon his own appeal, seizes him: so
    the poor third is up, till death enlarge his confine.

4 III / 5
  • He's walking in the garden--thus; and spurns
    The rush that lies before him;...
  • He's walking in the garden--thus; and spurns
    The rush that lies before him; cries, 'Fool Lepidus!'
    And threats the throat of that his officer
    That murder'd Pompey.
  • DOMITIUS ENOBARBUS. Then, world, thou hast a pair of chaps, no more;
    And throw between them all the food thou hast,
    They'll grind the one the other. Where's Antony?

    EROS. He's walking in the garden--thus; and spurns
    The rush that lies before him; cries, 'Fool Lepidus!'
    And threats the throat of that his officer
    That murder'd Pompey.

5 III / 5
  • For Italy and Caesar. More, Domitius;
    My lord desires you presently: my news...
  • For Italy and Caesar. More, Domitius;
    My lord desires you presently: my news
    I might have told hereafter.
  • DOMITIUS ENOBARBUS. Our great navy's rigg'd.

    EROS. For Italy and Caesar. More, Domitius;
    My lord desires you presently: my news
    I might have told hereafter.

6 III / 5
  • Come, sir.
  • Come, sir.
  • DOMITIUS ENOBARBUS. 'Twill be naught:
    But let it be. Bring me to Antony.

    EROS. Come, sir.

7 III / 11
  • Nay, gentle madam, to him, comfort him.
  • Nay, gentle madam, to him, comfort him.
  • ANTONY. I have fled myself; and have instructed cowards
    To run and show their shoulders. Friends, be gone;
    I have myself resolved upon a course
    Which has no need of you; be gone:
    My treasure's in the harbour, take it. O,
    I follow'd that I blush to look upon:
    My very hairs do mutiny; for the white
    Reprove the brown for rashness, and they them
    For fear and doting. Friends, be gone: you shall
    Have letters from me to some friends that will
    Sweep your way for you. Pray you, look not sad,
    Nor make replies of loathness: take the hint
    Which my despair proclaims; let that be left
    Which leaves itself: to the sea-side straightway:
    I will possess you of that ship and treasure.
    Leave me, I pray, a little: pray you now:
    Nay, do so; for, indeed, I have lost command,
    Therefore I pray you: I'll see you by and by.
    [Sits down]
    [Enter CLEOPATRA led by CHARMIAN and IRAS; EROS]
    following]

    EROS. Nay, gentle madam, to him, comfort him.

8 III / 11
  • See you here, sir?
  • See you here, sir?
  • ANTONY. No, no, no, no, no.

    EROS. See you here, sir?

9 III / 11
  • Sir, sir,--
  • Sir, sir,--
  • IRAS. Madam, O good empress!

    EROS. Sir, sir,--

10 III / 11
  • The queen, my lord, the queen.
  • The queen, my lord, the queen.
  • CLEOPATRA. Ah, stand by.

    EROS. The queen, my lord, the queen.

11 III / 11
  • Most noble sir, arise; the queen approaches:
    Her head's declined, and death...
  • Most noble sir, arise; the queen approaches:
    Her head's declined, and death will seize her, but
    Your comfort makes the rescue.
  • CLEOPATRA. Well then, sustain him: O!

    EROS. Most noble sir, arise; the queen approaches:
    Her head's declined, and death will seize her, but
    Your comfort makes the rescue.

12 III / 11
  • Sir, the queen.
  • Sir, the queen.
  • ANTONY. I have offended reputation,
    A most unnoble swerving.

    EROS. Sir, the queen.

13 IV / 4
  • Briefly, sir.
  • Briefly, sir.
  • ANTONY. Well, well;
    We shall thrive now. Seest thou, my good fellow?
    Go put on thy defences.

    EROS. Briefly, sir.

14 IV / 5
  • Sir, his chests and treasure
    He has not with him.
  • Sir, his chests and treasure
    He has not with him.
  • Soldier. Sir,
    He is with Caesar.

    EROS. Sir, his chests and treasure
    He has not with him.

15 IV / 7
  • They are beaten, sir, and our advantage serves
    For a fair victory.
  • They are beaten, sir, and our advantage serves
    For a fair victory.
  • SCARUS. We'll beat 'em into bench-holes: I have yet
    Room for six scotches more.

    EROS. They are beaten, sir, and our advantage serves
    For a fair victory.

16 IV / 14
  • Ay, noble lord.
  • Ay, noble lord.
  • ANTONY. Eros, thou yet behold'st me?

    EROS. Ay, noble lord.

17 IV / 14
  • Ay, my lord,
  • Ay, my lord,
  • ANTONY. Sometimes we see a cloud that's dragonish;
    A vapour sometime like a bear or lion,
    A tower'd citadel, a pendent rock,
    A forked mountain, or blue promontory
    With trees upon't, that nod unto the world,
    And mock our eyes with air: thou hast seen
    these signs;
    They are black vesper's pageants.

    EROS. Ay, my lord,

18 IV / 14
  • It does, my lord.
  • It does, my lord.
  • ANTONY. That which is now a horse, even with a thought
    The rack dislimns, and makes it indistinct,
    As water is in water.

    EROS. It does, my lord.

19 IV / 14
  • What would my lord?
  • What would my lord?
  • ANTONY. Unarm, Eros; the long day's task is done,
    And we must sleep.
    [To MARDIAN]
    That thou depart'st hence safe,
    Does pay thy labour richly; go.
    [Exit MARDIAN]
    Off, pluck off:
    The seven-fold shield of Ajax cannot keep
    The battery from my heart. O, cleave, my sides!
    Heart, once be stronger than thy continent,
    Crack thy frail case! Apace, Eros, apace.
    No more a soldier: bruised pieces, go;
    You have been nobly borne. From me awhile.
    [Exit EROS]
    I will o'ertake thee, Cleopatra, and
    Weep for my pardon. So it must be, for now
    All length is torture: since the torch is out,
    Lie down, and stray no farther: now all labour
    Mars what it does; yea, very force entangles
    Itself with strength: seal then, and all is done.
    Eros!--I come, my queen:--Eros!--Stay for me:
    Where souls do couch on flowers, we'll hand in hand,
    And with our sprightly port make the ghosts gaze:
    Dido and her AEneas shall want troops,
    And all the haunt be ours. Come, Eros, Eros!

    EROS. What would my lord?

20 IV / 14
  • The gods withhold me!
    Shall I do that which all the Parthian darts,
    Thou...
  • The gods withhold me!
    Shall I do that which all the Parthian darts,
    Though enemy, lost aim, and could not?
  • ANTONY. Since Cleopatra died,
    I have lived in such dishonour, that the gods
    Detest my baseness. I, that with my sword
    Quarter'd the world, and o'er green Neptune's back
    With ships made cities, condemn myself to lack
    The courage of a woman; less noble mind
    Than she which by her death our Caesar tells
    'I am conqueror of myself.' Thou art sworn, Eros,
    That, when the exigent should come, which now
    Is come indeed, when I should see behind me
    The inevitable prosecution of
    Disgrace and horror, that, on my command,
    Thou then wouldst kill me: do't; the time is come:
    Thou strikest not me, 'tis Caesar thou defeat'st.
    Put colour in thy cheek.

    EROS. The gods withhold me!
    Shall I do that which all the Parthian darts,
    Though enemy, lost aim, and could not?

21 IV / 14
  • I would not see't.
  • I would not see't.
  • ANTONY. Eros,
    Wouldst thou be window'd in great Rome and see
    Thy master thus with pleach'd arms, bending down
    His corrigible neck, his face subdued
    To penetrative shame, whilst the wheel'd seat
    Of fortunate Caesar, drawn before him, branded
    His baseness that ensued?

    EROS. I would not see't.

22 IV / 14
  • O, sir, pardon me!
  • O, sir, pardon me!
  • ANTONY. Come, then; for with a wound I must be cured.
    Draw that thy honest sword, which thou hast worn
    Most useful for thy country.

    EROS. O, sir, pardon me!

23 IV / 14
  • Turn from me, then, that noble countenance,
    Wherein the worship of the whole...
  • Turn from me, then, that noble countenance,
    Wherein the worship of the whole world lies.
  • ANTONY. When I did make thee free, sworest thou not then
    To do this when I bade thee? Do it at once;
    Or thy precedent services are all
    But accidents unpurposed. Draw, and come.

    EROS. Turn from me, then, that noble countenance,
    Wherein the worship of the whole world lies.

24 IV / 14
  • My sword is drawn.
  • My sword is drawn.
  • ANTONY. Lo thee!

    EROS. My sword is drawn.

25 IV / 14
  • My dear master,
    My captain, and my emperor, let me say,
    Before I strike...
  • My dear master,
    My captain, and my emperor, let me say,
    Before I strike this bloody stroke, farewell.
  • ANTONY. Then let it do at once
    The thing why thou hast drawn it.

    EROS. My dear master,
    My captain, and my emperor, let me say,
    Before I strike this bloody stroke, farewell.

26 IV / 14
  • Farewell, great chief. Shall I strike now?
  • Farewell, great chief. Shall I strike now?
  • ANTONY. 'Tis said, man; and farewell.

    EROS. Farewell, great chief. Shall I strike now?

27 IV / 14
  • Why, there then: thus I do escape the sorrow
    Of Antony's death.
  • Why, there then: thus I do escape the sorrow
    Of Antony's death.
  • ANTONY. Now, Eros.

    EROS. Why, there then: thus I do escape the sorrow
    Of Antony's death.

© Copyright 2017-2023 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.

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© Copyright 2017-2023 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.