Speeches (Lines) for Fabian in "Twelfth Night; or, What You Will"

Total: 51
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 II / 5
  • Nay, I'll come: if I lose a scruple of this sport,
    let me be boiled to death...
  • Nay, I'll come: if I lose a scruple of this sport,
    let me be boiled to death with melancholy.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Come thy ways, Signior Fabian.

    Fabian. Nay, I'll come: if I lose a scruple of this sport,
    let me be boiled to death with melancholy.

2 II / 5
  • I would exult, man: you know, he brought me out o'
    favour with my lady about...
  • I would exult, man: you know, he brought me out o'
    favour with my lady about a bear-baiting here.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Wouldst thou not be glad to have the niggardly
    rascally sheep-biter come by some notable shame?

    Fabian. I would exult, man: you know, he brought me out o'
    favour with my lady about a bear-baiting here.

3 II / 5
  • O, peace! Contemplation makes a rare turkey-cock
    of him: how he jets under h...
  • O, peace! Contemplation makes a rare turkey-cock
    of him: how he jets under his advanced plumes!
  • Sir Toby Belch. Here's an overweening rogue!

    Fabian. O, peace! Contemplation makes a rare turkey-cock
    of him: how he jets under his advanced plumes!

4 II / 5
  • O, peace! now he's deeply in: look how
    imagination blows him.
  • O, peace! now he's deeply in: look how
    imagination blows him.
  • Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Fie on him, Jezebel!

    Fabian. O, peace! now he's deeply in: look how
    imagination blows him.

5 II / 5
  • O, peace, peace!
  • O, peace, peace!
  • Sir Toby Belch. Fire and brimstone!

    Fabian. O, peace, peace!

6 II / 5
  • O peace, peace, peace! now, now.
  • O peace, peace, peace! now, now.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Bolts and shackles!

    Fabian. O peace, peace, peace! now, now.

7 II / 5
  • Though our silence be drawn from us with cars, yet peace.
  • Though our silence be drawn from us with cars, yet peace.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Shall this fellow live?

    Fabian. Though our silence be drawn from us with cars, yet peace.

8 II / 5
  • Nay, patience, or we break the sinews of our plot.
  • Nay, patience, or we break the sinews of our plot.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Out, scab!

    Fabian. Nay, patience, or we break the sinews of our plot.

9 II / 5
  • Now is the woodcock near the gin.
  • Now is the woodcock near the gin.
  • Malvolio. What employment have we here?

    Fabian. Now is the woodcock near the gin.

10 II / 5
  • This wins him, liver and all.
  • This wins him, liver and all.
  • Malvolio. [Reads] 'To the unknown beloved, this, and my good
    wishes:'--her very phrases! By your leave, wax.
    Soft! and the impressure her Lucrece, with which she
    uses to seal: 'tis my lady. To whom should this be?

    Fabian. This wins him, liver and all.

11 II / 5
  • A fustian riddle!
  • A fustian riddle!
  • Malvolio. [Reads]
    I may command where I adore;
    But silence, like a Lucrece knife,
    With bloodless stroke my heart doth gore:
    M, O, A, I, doth sway my life.

    Fabian. A fustian riddle!

12 II / 5
  • What dish o' poison has she dressed him!
  • What dish o' poison has she dressed him!
  • Malvolio. 'M, O, A, I, doth sway my life.' Nay, but first, let
    me see, let me see, let me see.

    Fabian. What dish o' poison has she dressed him!

13 II / 5
  • Sowter will cry upon't for all this, though it be as
    rank as a fox.
  • Sowter will cry upon't for all this, though it be as
    rank as a fox.
  • Sir Toby Belch. O, ay, make up that: he is now at a cold scent.

    Fabian. Sowter will cry upon't for all this, though it be as
    rank as a fox.

14 II / 5
  • Did not I say he would work it out? the cur is
    excellent at faults.
  • Did not I say he would work it out? the cur is
    excellent at faults.
  • Malvolio. M,--Malvolio; M,--why, that begins my name.

    Fabian. Did not I say he would work it out? the cur is
    excellent at faults.

15 II / 5
  • And O shall end, I hope.
  • And O shall end, I hope.
  • Malvolio. M,--but then there is no consonancy in the sequel;
    that suffers under probation A should follow but O does.

    Fabian. And O shall end, I hope.

16 II / 5
  • Ay, an you had any eye behind you, you might see
    more detraction at your hee...
  • Ay, an you had any eye behind you, you might see
    more detraction at your heels than fortunes before
    you.
  • Malvolio. And then I comes behind.

    Fabian. Ay, an you had any eye behind you, you might see
    more detraction at your heels than fortunes before
    you.

17 II / 5
  • I will not give my part of this sport for a pension
    of thousands to be paid...
  • I will not give my part of this sport for a pension
    of thousands to be paid from the Sophy.
  • Malvolio. M, O, A, I; this simulation is not as the former: and
    yet, to crush this a little, it would bow to me, for
    every one of these letters are in my name. Soft!
    here follows prose.
    [Reads]
    'If this fall into thy hand, revolve. In my stars I
    am above thee; but be not afraid of greatness: some
    are born great, some achieve greatness, and some
    have greatness thrust upon 'em. Thy Fates open
    their hands; let thy blood and spirit embrace them;
    and, to inure thyself to what thou art like to be,
    cast thy humble slough and appear fresh. Be
    opposite with a kinsman, surly with servants; let
    thy tongue tang arguments of state; put thyself into
    the trick of singularity: she thus advises thee
    that sighs for thee. Remember who commended thy
    yellow stockings, and wished to see thee ever
    cross-gartered: I say, remember. Go to, thou art
    made, if thou desirest to be so; if not, let me see
    thee a steward still, the fellow of servants, and
    not worthy to touch Fortune's fingers. Farewell.
    She that would alter services with thee,
    THE FORTUNATE-UNHAPPY.'
    Daylight and champaign discovers not more: this is
    open. I will be proud, I will read politic authors,
    I will baffle Sir Toby, I will wash off gross
    acquaintance, I will be point-devise the very man.
    I do not now fool myself, to let imagination jade
    me; for every reason excites to this, that my lady
    loves me. She did commend my yellow stockings of
    late, she did praise my leg being cross-gartered;
    and in this she manifests herself to my love, and
    with a kind of injunction drives me to these habits
    of her liking. I thank my stars I am happy. I will
    be strange, stout, in yellow stockings, and
    cross-gartered, even with the swiftness of putting
    on. Jove and my stars be praised! Here is yet a
    postscript.
    [Reads]
    'Thou canst not choose but know who I am. If thou
    entertainest my love, let it appear in thy smiling;
    thy smiles become thee well; therefore in my
    presence still smile, dear my sweet, I prithee.'
    Jove, I thank thee: I will smile; I will do
    everything that thou wilt have me.

    Fabian. I will not give my part of this sport for a pension
    of thousands to be paid from the Sophy.

18 II / 5
  • Here comes my noble gull-catcher.
  • Here comes my noble gull-catcher.
  • Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Nor I neither.

    Fabian. Here comes my noble gull-catcher.

19 III / 2
  • You must needs yield your reason, Sir Andrew.
  • You must needs yield your reason, Sir Andrew.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Thy reason, dear venom, give thy reason.

    Fabian. You must needs yield your reason, Sir Andrew.

20 III / 2
  • This was a great argument of love in her toward you.
  • This was a great argument of love in her toward you.
  • Sir Andrew Aguecheek. As plain as I see you now.

    Fabian. This was a great argument of love in her toward you.

21 III / 2
  • I will prove it legitimate, sir, upon the oaths of
    judgment and reason.
  • I will prove it legitimate, sir, upon the oaths of
    judgment and reason.
  • Sir Andrew Aguecheek. 'Slight, will you make an ass o' me?

    Fabian. I will prove it legitimate, sir, upon the oaths of
    judgment and reason.

22 III / 2
  • She did show favour to the youth in your sight only
    to exasperate you, to aw...
  • She did show favour to the youth in your sight only
    to exasperate you, to awake your dormouse valour, to
    put fire in your heart and brimstone in your liver.
    You should then have accosted her; and with some
    excellent jests, fire-new from the mint, you should
    have banged the youth into dumbness. This was
    looked for at your hand, and this was balked: the
    double gilt of this opportunity you let time wash
    off, and you are now sailed into the north of my
    lady's opinion; where you will hang like an icicle
    on a Dutchman's beard, unless you do redeem it by
    some laudable attempt either of valour or policy.
  • Sir Toby Belch. And they have been grand-jury-men since before Noah
    was a sailor.

    Fabian. She did show favour to the youth in your sight only
    to exasperate you, to awake your dormouse valour, to
    put fire in your heart and brimstone in your liver.
    You should then have accosted her; and with some
    excellent jests, fire-new from the mint, you should
    have banged the youth into dumbness. This was
    looked for at your hand, and this was balked: the
    double gilt of this opportunity you let time wash
    off, and you are now sailed into the north of my
    lady's opinion; where you will hang like an icicle
    on a Dutchman's beard, unless you do redeem it by
    some laudable attempt either of valour or policy.

23 III / 2
  • There is no way but this, Sir Andrew.
  • There is no way but this, Sir Andrew.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Why, then, build me thy fortunes upon the basis of
    valour. Challenge me the count's youth to fight
    with him; hurt him in eleven places: my niece shall
    take note of it; and assure thyself, there is no
    love-broker in the world can more prevail in man's
    commendation with woman than report of valour.

    Fabian. There is no way but this, Sir Andrew.

24 III / 2
  • This is a dear manikin to you, Sir Toby.
  • This is a dear manikin to you, Sir Toby.
  • Sir Toby Belch. We'll call thee at the cubiculo: go.

    Fabian. This is a dear manikin to you, Sir Toby.

25 III / 2
  • We shall have a rare letter from him: but you'll
    not deliver't?
  • We shall have a rare letter from him: but you'll
    not deliver't?
  • Sir Toby Belch. I have been dear to him, lad, some two thousand
    strong, or so.

    Fabian. We shall have a rare letter from him: but you'll
    not deliver't?

26 III / 2
  • And his opposite, the youth, bears in his visage no
    great presage of cruelty...
  • And his opposite, the youth, bears in his visage no
    great presage of cruelty.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Never trust me, then; and by all means stir on the
    youth to an answer. I think oxen and wainropes
    cannot hale them together. For Andrew, if he were
    opened, and you find so much blood in his liver as
    will clog the foot of a flea, I'll eat the rest of
    the anatomy.

    Fabian. And his opposite, the youth, bears in his visage no
    great presage of cruelty.

27 III / 4
  • Here he is, here he is. How is't with you, sir?
    how is't with you, man?
  • Here he is, here he is. How is't with you, sir?
    how is't with you, man?
  • Sir Toby Belch. Which way is he, in the name of sanctity? If all
    the devils of hell be drawn in little, and Legion
    himself possessed him, yet I'll speak to him.

    Fabian. Here he is, here he is. How is't with you, sir?
    how is't with you, man?

28 III / 4
  • Carry his water to the wise woman.
  • Carry his water to the wise woman.
  • Maria. La you, an you speak ill of the devil, how he takes
    it at heart! Pray God, he be not bewitched!

    Fabian. Carry his water to the wise woman.

29 III / 4
  • No way but gentleness; gently, gently: the fiend is
    rough, and will not be r...
  • No way but gentleness; gently, gently: the fiend is
    rough, and will not be roughly used.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Prithee, hold thy peace; this is not the way: do
    you not see you move him? let me alone with him.

    Fabian. No way but gentleness; gently, gently: the fiend is
    rough, and will not be roughly used.

30 III / 4
  • If this were played upon a stage now, I could
    condemn it as an improbable fi...
  • If this were played upon a stage now, I could
    condemn it as an improbable fiction.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Is't possible?

    Fabian. If this were played upon a stage now, I could
    condemn it as an improbable fiction.

31 III / 4
  • Why, we shall make him mad indeed.
  • Why, we shall make him mad indeed.
  • Maria. Nay, pursue him now, lest the device take air and taint.

    Fabian. Why, we shall make him mad indeed.

32 III / 4
  • More matter for a May morning.
  • More matter for a May morning.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Come, we'll have him in a dark room and bound. My
    niece is already in the belief that he's mad: we
    may carry it thus, for our pleasure and his penance,
    till our very pastime, tired out of breath, prompt
    us to have mercy on him: at which time we will
    bring the device to the bar and crown thee for a
    finder of madmen. But see, but see.

    Fabian. More matter for a May morning.

33 III / 4
  • Is't so saucy?
  • Is't so saucy?
  • Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Here's the challenge, read it: warrant there's
    vinegar and pepper in't.

    Fabian. Is't so saucy?

34 III / 4
  • Good, and valiant.
  • Good, and valiant.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Give me.
    [Reads]
    'Youth, whatsoever thou art, thou art but a scurvy fellow.'

    Fabian. Good, and valiant.

35 III / 4
  • A good note; that keeps you from the blow of the law.
  • A good note; that keeps you from the blow of the law.
  • Sir Toby Belch. [Reads] 'Wonder not, nor admire not in thy mind,
    why I do call thee so, for I will show thee no reason for't.'

    Fabian. A good note; that keeps you from the blow of the law.

36 III / 4
  • Very brief, and to exceeding good sense--less.
  • Very brief, and to exceeding good sense--less.
  • Sir Toby Belch. [Reads] 'Thou comest to the lady Olivia, and in my
    sight she uses thee kindly: but thou liest in thy
    throat; that is not the matter I challenge thee for.'

    Fabian. Very brief, and to exceeding good sense--less.

37 III / 4
  • Good.
  • Good.
  • Sir Toby Belch. [Reads] 'I will waylay thee going home; where if it
    be thy chance to kill me,'--

    Fabian. Good.

38 III / 4
  • Still you keep o' the windy side of the law: good.
  • Still you keep o' the windy side of the law: good.
  • Sir Toby Belch. [Reads] 'Thou killest me like a rogue and a villain.'

    Fabian. Still you keep o' the windy side of the law: good.

39 III / 4
  • Here he comes with your niece: give them way till
    he take leave, and present...
  • Here he comes with your niece: give them way till
    he take leave, and presently after him.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Now will not I deliver his letter: for the behavior
    of the young gentleman gives him out to be of good
    capacity and breeding; his employment between his
    lord and my niece confirms no less: therefore this
    letter, being so excellently ignorant, will breed no
    terror in the youth: he will find it comes from a
    clodpole. But, sir, I will deliver his challenge by
    word of mouth; set upon Aguecheek a notable report
    of valour; and drive the gentleman, as I know his
    youth will aptly receive it, into a most hideous
    opinion of his rage, skill, fury and impetuosity.
    This will so fright them both that they will kill
    one another by the look, like cockatrices.

    Fabian. Here he comes with your niece: give them way till
    he take leave, and presently after him.

40 III / 4
  • I know the knight is incensed against you, even to a
    mortal arbitrement; but...
  • I know the knight is incensed against you, even to a
    mortal arbitrement; but nothing of the circumstance more.
  • Viola. Pray you, sir, do you know of this matter?

    Fabian. I know the knight is incensed against you, even to a
    mortal arbitrement; but nothing of the circumstance more.

41 III / 4
  • Nothing of that wonderful promise, to read him by
    his form, as you are like...
  • Nothing of that wonderful promise, to read him by
    his form, as you are like to find him in the proof
    of his valour. He is, indeed, sir, the most skilful,
    bloody and fatal opposite that you could possibly
    have found in any part of Illyria. Will you walk
    towards him? I will make your peace with him if I
    can.
  • Viola. I beseech you, what manner of man is he?

    Fabian. Nothing of that wonderful promise, to read him by
    his form, as you are like to find him in the proof
    of his valour. He is, indeed, sir, the most skilful,
    bloody and fatal opposite that you could possibly
    have found in any part of Illyria. Will you walk
    towards him? I will make your peace with him if I
    can.

42 III / 4
  • He is as horribly conceited of him; and pants and
    looks pale, as if a bear w...
  • He is as horribly conceited of him; and pants and
    looks pale, as if a bear were at his heels.
  • Sir Toby Belch. I'll make the motion: stand here, make a good show
    on't: this shall end without the perdition of souls.
    [Aside]
    Marry, I'll ride your horse as well as I ride you.
    [Re-enter FABIAN and VIOLA]
    [To FABIAN]
    I have his horse to take up the quarrel:
    I have persuaded him the youth's a devil.

    Fabian. He is as horribly conceited of him; and pants and
    looks pale, as if a bear were at his heels.

43 III / 4
  • Give ground, if you see him furious.
  • Give ground, if you see him furious.
  • Viola. [Aside] Pray God defend me! A little thing would
    make me tell them how much I lack of a man.

    Fabian. Give ground, if you see him furious.

44 III / 4
  • O good Sir Toby, hold! here come the officers.
  • O good Sir Toby, hold! here come the officers.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Nay, if you be an undertaker, I am for you.

    Fabian. O good Sir Toby, hold! here come the officers.

45 III / 4
  • A coward, a most devout coward, religious in it.
  • A coward, a most devout coward, religious in it.
  • Sir Toby Belch. A very dishonest paltry boy, and more a coward than
    a hare: his dishonesty appears in leaving his
    friend here in necessity and denying him; and for
    his cowardship, ask Fabian.

    Fabian. A coward, a most devout coward, religious in it.

46 III / 4
  • Come, let's see the event.
  • Come, let's see the event.
  • Sir Andrew Aguecheek. An I do not,--

    Fabian. Come, let's see the event.

47 V / 1
  • Now, as thou lovest me, let me see his letter.
  • Now, as thou lovest me, let me see his letter.
  • Olivia. Then lead the way, good father; and heavens so shine,
    That they may fairly note this act of mine!

    Fabian. Now, as thou lovest me, let me see his letter.

48 V / 1
  • Any thing.
  • Any thing.
  • Feste. Good Master Fabian, grant me another request.

    Fabian. Any thing.

49 V / 1
  • This is, to give a dog, and in recompense desire my
    dog again.
  • This is, to give a dog, and in recompense desire my
    dog again.
  • Feste. Do not desire to see this letter.

    Fabian. This is, to give a dog, and in recompense desire my
    dog again.

50 V / 1
  • [Reads] 'By the Lord, madam, you wrong me, and the
    world shall know it: thou...
  • [Reads] 'By the Lord, madam, you wrong me, and the
    world shall know it: though you have put me into
    darkness and given your drunken cousin rule over
    me, yet have I the benefit of my senses as well as
    your ladyship. I have your own letter that induced
    me to the semblance I put on; with the which I doubt
    not but to do myself much right, or you much shame.
    Think of me as you please. I leave my duty a little
    unthought of and speak out of my injury.
    THE MADLY-USED MALVOLIO.'
  • Olivia. Read it you, sirrah.

    Fabian. [Reads] 'By the Lord, madam, you wrong me, and the
    world shall know it: though you have put me into
    darkness and given your drunken cousin rule over
    me, yet have I the benefit of my senses as well as
    your ladyship. I have your own letter that induced
    me to the semblance I put on; with the which I doubt
    not but to do myself much right, or you much shame.
    Think of me as you please. I leave my duty a little
    unthought of and speak out of my injury.
    THE MADLY-USED MALVOLIO.'

51 V / 1
  • Good madam, hear me speak,
    And let no quarrel nor no brawl to come
    Taint...
  • Good madam, hear me speak,
    And let no quarrel nor no brawl to come
    Taint the condition of this present hour,
    Which I have wonder'd at. In hope it shall not,
    Most freely I confess, myself and Toby
    Set this device against Malvolio here,
    Upon some stubborn and uncourteous parts
    We had conceived against him: Maria writ
    The letter at Sir Toby's great importance;
    In recompense whereof he hath married her.
    How with a sportful malice it was follow'd,
    May rather pluck on laughter than revenge;
    If that the injuries be justly weigh'd
    That have on both sides pass'd.
  • Olivia. Alas, Malvolio, this is not my writing,
    Though, I confess, much like the character
    But out of question 'tis Maria's hand.
    And now I do bethink me, it was she
    First told me thou wast mad; then camest in smiling,
    And in such forms which here were presupposed
    Upon thee in the letter. Prithee, be content:
    This practise hath most shrewdly pass'd upon thee;
    But when we know the grounds and authors of it,
    Thou shalt be both the plaintiff and the judge
    Of thine own cause.

    Fabian. Good madam, hear me speak,
    And let no quarrel nor no brawl to come
    Taint the condition of this present hour,
    Which I have wonder'd at. In hope it shall not,
    Most freely I confess, myself and Toby
    Set this device against Malvolio here,
    Upon some stubborn and uncourteous parts
    We had conceived against him: Maria writ
    The letter at Sir Toby's great importance;
    In recompense whereof he hath married her.
    How with a sportful malice it was follow'd,
    May rather pluck on laughter than revenge;
    If that the injuries be justly weigh'd
    That have on both sides pass'd.

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