Speeches (Lines) for First Gaoler in "Cymbeline, King of Britain"

Total: 9
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 V / 4
  • You shall not now be stol'n, you have locks upon you;
    So graze as you find p...
  • You shall not now be stol'n, you have locks upon you;
    So graze as you find pasture.
  • Second British Captain. Lay hands on him; a dog!
    A leg of Rome shall not return to tell
    What crows have peck'd them here. He brags
    his service
    As if he were of note: bring him to the king.
    [Enter CYMBELINE, BELARIUS, GUIDERIUS, ARVIRAGUS,]
    PISANIO, Soldiers, Attendants, and Roman Captives.
    The Captains present POSTHUMUS LEONATUS to
    CYMBELINE, who delivers him over to a Gaoler:
    then exeunt omnes]

    First Gaoler. You shall not now be stol'n, you have locks upon you;
    So graze as you find pasture.

2 V / 4
  • Come, sir, are you ready for death?
  • Come, sir, are you ready for death?
  • Posthumus Leonatus. [Waking] Sleep, thou hast been a grandsire, and begot
    A father to me; and thou hast created
    A mother and two brothers: but, O scorn!
    Gone! they went hence so soon as they were born:
    And so I am awake. Poor wretches that depend
    On greatness' favour dream as I have done,
    Wake and find nothing. But, alas, I swerve:
    Many dream not to find, neither deserve,
    And yet are steep'd in favours: so am I,
    That have this golden chance and know not why.
    What fairies haunt this ground? A book? O rare one!
    Be not, as is our fangled world, a garment
    Nobler than that it covers: let thy effects
    So follow, to be most unlike our courtiers,
    As good as promise.
    [Reads]
    'When as a lion's whelp shall, to himself unknown,
    without seeking find, and be embraced by a piece of
    tender air; and when from a stately cedar shall be
    lopped branches, which, being dead many years,
    shall after revive, be jointed to the old stock and
    freshly grow; then shall Posthumus end his miseries,
    Britain be fortunate and flourish in peace and plenty.'
    'Tis still a dream, or else such stuff as madmen
    Tongue and brain not; either both or nothing;
    Or senseless speaking or a speaking such
    As sense cannot untie. Be what it is,
    The action of my life is like it, which
    I'll keep, if but for sympathy.

    First Gaoler. Come, sir, are you ready for death?

3 V / 4
  • Hanging is the word, sir: if
    you be ready for that, you are well cooked.
  • Hanging is the word, sir: if
    you be ready for that, you are well cooked.
  • Posthumus Leonatus. Over-roasted rather; ready long ago.

    First Gaoler. Hanging is the word, sir: if
    you be ready for that, you are well cooked.

4 V / 4
  • A heavy reckoning for you, sir. But the comfort is,
    you shall be called to n...
  • A heavy reckoning for you, sir. But the comfort is,
    you shall be called to no more payments, fear no
    more tavern-bills; which are often the sadness of
    parting, as the procuring of mirth: you come in
    flint for want of meat, depart reeling with too
    much drink; sorry that you have paid too much, and
    sorry that you are paid too much; purse and brain
    both empty; the brain the heavier for being too
    light, the purse too light, being drawn of
    heaviness: of this contradiction you shall now be
    quit. O, the charity of a penny cord! It sums up
    thousands in a trice: you have no true debitor and
    creditor but it; of what's past, is, and to come,
    the discharge: your neck, sir, is pen, book and
    counters; so the acquittance follows.
  • Posthumus Leonatus. So, if I prove a good repast to the
    spectators, the dish pays the shot.

    First Gaoler. A heavy reckoning for you, sir. But the comfort is,
    you shall be called to no more payments, fear no
    more tavern-bills; which are often the sadness of
    parting, as the procuring of mirth: you come in
    flint for want of meat, depart reeling with too
    much drink; sorry that you have paid too much, and
    sorry that you are paid too much; purse and brain
    both empty; the brain the heavier for being too
    light, the purse too light, being drawn of
    heaviness: of this contradiction you shall now be
    quit. O, the charity of a penny cord! It sums up
    thousands in a trice: you have no true debitor and
    creditor but it; of what's past, is, and to come,
    the discharge: your neck, sir, is pen, book and
    counters; so the acquittance follows.

5 V / 4
  • Indeed, sir, he that sleeps feels not the
    tooth-ache: but a man that were to...
  • Indeed, sir, he that sleeps feels not the
    tooth-ache: but a man that were to sleep your
    sleep, and a hangman to help him to bed, I think he
    would change places with his officer; for, look you,
    sir, you know not which way you shall go.
  • Posthumus Leonatus. I am merrier to die than thou art to live.

    First Gaoler. Indeed, sir, he that sleeps feels not the
    tooth-ache: but a man that were to sleep your
    sleep, and a hangman to help him to bed, I think he
    would change places with his officer; for, look you,
    sir, you know not which way you shall go.

6 V / 4
  • Your death has eyes in 's head then; I have not seen
    him so pictured: you mu...
  • Your death has eyes in 's head then; I have not seen
    him so pictured: you must either be directed by
    some that take upon them to know, or do take upon
    yourself that which I am sure you do not know, or
    jump the after inquiry on your own peril: and how
    you shall speed in your journey's end, I think you'll
    never return to tell one.
  • Posthumus Leonatus. Yes, indeed do I, fellow.

    First Gaoler. Your death has eyes in 's head then; I have not seen
    him so pictured: you must either be directed by
    some that take upon them to know, or do take upon
    yourself that which I am sure you do not know, or
    jump the after inquiry on your own peril: and how
    you shall speed in your journey's end, I think you'll
    never return to tell one.

7 V / 4
  • What an infinite mock is this, that a man should
    have the best use of eyes t...
  • What an infinite mock is this, that a man should
    have the best use of eyes to see the way of
    blindness! I am sure hanging's the way of winking.
  • Posthumus Leonatus. I tell thee, fellow, there are none want eyes to
    direct them the way I am going, but such as wink and
    will not use them.

    First Gaoler. What an infinite mock is this, that a man should
    have the best use of eyes to see the way of
    blindness! I am sure hanging's the way of winking.

8 V / 4
  • I'll be hang'd then.
  • I'll be hang'd then.
  • Posthumus Leonatus. Thou bring'st good news; I am called to be made free.

    First Gaoler. I'll be hang'd then.

9 V / 4
  • Unless a man would marry a gallows and beget young
    gibbets, I never saw one...
  • Unless a man would marry a gallows and beget young
    gibbets, I never saw one so prone. Yet, on my
    conscience, there are verier knaves desire to live,
    for all he be a Roman: and there be some of them
    too that die against their wills; so should I, if I
    were one. I would we were all of one mind, and one
    mind good; O, there were desolation of gaolers and
    gallowses! I speak against my present profit, but
    my wish hath a preferment in 't.
  • Posthumus Leonatus. Thou shalt be then freer than a gaoler; no bolts for the dead.

    First Gaoler. Unless a man would marry a gallows and beget young
    gibbets, I never saw one so prone. Yet, on my
    conscience, there are verier knaves desire to live,
    for all he be a Roman: and there be some of them
    too that die against their wills; so should I, if I
    were one. I would we were all of one mind, and one
    mind good; O, there were desolation of gaolers and
    gallowses! I speak against my present profit, but
    my wish hath a preferment in 't.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.