Speeches (Lines) for First Lord in "The Tragedy of Coriolanus"

Total: 4
print
# Act / Scene Speech text
1 V / 6
  • And grieve to hear't.
    What faults he made before the last, I think
    Might...
  • And grieve to hear't.
    What faults he made before the last, I think
    Might have found easy fines: but there to end
    Where he was to begin and give away
    The benefit of our levies, answering us
    With our own charge, making a treaty where
    There was a yielding,--this admits no excuse.
  • All Lords. We have.

    First Lord. And grieve to hear't.
    What faults he made before the last, I think
    Might have found easy fines: but there to end
    Where he was to begin and give away
    The benefit of our levies, answering us
    With our own charge, making a treaty where
    There was a yielding,--this admits no excuse.

2 V / 6
  • Peace, both, and hear me speak.
  • Peace, both, and hear me speak.
  • Coriolanus. Measureless liar, thou hast made my heart
    Too great for what contains it. Boy! O slave!
    Pardon me, lords, 'tis the first time that ever
    I was forced to scold. Your judgments, my grave lords,
    Must give this cur the lie: and his own notion--
    Who wears my stripes impress'd upon him; that
    Must bear my beating to his grave--shall join
    To thrust the lie unto him.

    First Lord. Peace, both, and hear me speak.

3 V / 6
  • O Tullus,--
  • O Tullus,--
  • Tullus Aufidius. My noble masters, hear me speak.

    First Lord. O Tullus,--

4 V / 6
  • Bear from hence his body;
    And mourn you for him: let him be regarded
    As...
  • Bear from hence his body;
    And mourn you for him: let him be regarded
    As the most noble corse that ever herald
    Did follow to his urn.
  • Tullus Aufidius. My lords, when you shall know--as in this rage,
    Provoked by him, you cannot--the great danger
    Which this man's life did owe you, you'll rejoice
    That he is thus cut off. Please it your honours
    To call me to your senate, I'll deliver
    Myself your loyal servant, or endure
    Your heaviest censure.

    First Lord. Bear from hence his body;
    And mourn you for him: let him be regarded
    As the most noble corse that ever herald
    Did follow to his urn.

© Copyright 2017-2021 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.

shakespeare_network

© Copyright 2017-2021 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.