Speeches (Lines) for First Lord in "The Tragedy of Timon of Athens"

Total: 28
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 1
  • What time o' day is't, Apemantus?
  • What time o' day is't, Apemantus?
  • Timon. Right welcome, sir!
    Ere we depart, we'll share a bounteous time
    In different pleasures. Pray you, let us in.

    First Lord. What time o' day is't, Apemantus?

2 I / 1
  • That time serves still.
  • That time serves still.
  • Apemantus. Time to be honest.

    First Lord. That time serves still.

3 I / 1
  • Hang thyself!
  • Hang thyself!
  • Apemantus. Shouldst have kept one to thyself, for I mean to
    give thee none.

    First Lord. Hang thyself!

4 I / 1
  • He's opposite to humanity. Come, shall we in,
    And taste Lord Timon's bounty?...
  • He's opposite to humanity. Come, shall we in,
    And taste Lord Timon's bounty? he outgoes
    The very heart of kindness.
  • Apemantus. I will fly, like a dog, the heels o' the ass.

    First Lord. He's opposite to humanity. Come, shall we in,
    And taste Lord Timon's bounty? he outgoes
    The very heart of kindness.

5 I / 1
  • The noblest mind he carries
    That ever govern'd man.
  • The noblest mind he carries
    That ever govern'd man.
  • Second Lord. He pours it out; Plutus, the god of gold,
    Is but his steward: no meed, but he repays
    Sevenfold above itself; no gift to him,
    But breeds the giver a return exceeding
    All use of quittance.

    First Lord. The noblest mind he carries
    That ever govern'd man.

6 I / 1
  • I'll keep you company.
  • I'll keep you company.
  • Second Lord. Long may he live in fortunes! Shall we in?

    First Lord. I'll keep you company.

7 I / 2
  • My lord, we always have confess'd it.
  • My lord, we always have confess'd it.
  • Timon. Nay, my lords,
    [They all stand ceremoniously looking on TIMON]
    Ceremony was but devised at first
    To set a gloss on faint deeds, hollow welcomes,
    Recanting goodness, sorry ere 'tis shown;
    But where there is true friendship, there needs none.
    Pray, sit; more welcome are ye to my fortunes
    Than my fortunes to me.

    First Lord. My lord, we always have confess'd it.

8 I / 2
  • Might we but have that happiness, my lord, that you
    would once use our heart...
  • Might we but have that happiness, my lord, that you
    would once use our hearts, whereby we might express
    some part of our zeals, we should think ourselves
    for ever perfect.
  • Apemantus. Would all those fatterers were thine enemies then,
    that then thou mightst kill 'em and bid me to 'em!

    First Lord. Might we but have that happiness, my lord, that you
    would once use our hearts, whereby we might express
    some part of our zeals, we should think ourselves
    for ever perfect.

9 I / 2
  • You see, my lord, how ample you're beloved.
    [Music. Re-enter Cupid with a ma...
  • You see, my lord, how ample you're beloved.
    [Music. Re-enter Cupid with a mask of Ladies]
    as Amazons, with lutes in their hands,
    dancing and playing]
  • Timon. They're welcome all; let 'em have kind admittance:
    Music, make their welcome!

    First Lord. You see, my lord, how ample you're beloved.
    [Music. Re-enter Cupid with a mask of Ladies]
    as Amazons, with lutes in their hands,
    dancing and playing]

10 I / 2
  • Where be our men?
  • Where be our men?
  • Flavius. Yes, my lord. More jewels yet!
    There is no crossing him in 's humour;
    [Aside]
    Else I should tell him,--well, i' faith I should,
    When all's spent, he 'ld be cross'd then, an he could.
    'Tis pity bounty had not eyes behind,
    That man might ne'er be wretched for his mind.

    First Lord. Where be our men?

11 I / 2
  • I am so far already in your gifts,--
  • I am so far already in your gifts,--
  • Timon. O my friends,
    I have one word to say to you: look you, my good lord,
    I must entreat you, honour me so much
    As to advance this jewel; accept it and wear it,
    Kind my lord.

    First Lord. I am so far already in your gifts,--

12 I / 2
  • We are so virtuously bound--
  • We are so virtuously bound--
  • Alcibiades. Ay, defiled land, my lord.

    First Lord. We are so virtuously bound--

13 I / 2
  • The best of happiness,
    Honour and fortunes, keep with you, Lord Timon!
  • The best of happiness,
    Honour and fortunes, keep with you, Lord Timon!
  • Timon. All to you. Lights, more lights!

    First Lord. The best of happiness,
    Honour and fortunes, keep with you, Lord Timon!

14 III / 6
  • The good time of day to you, sir.
  • The good time of day to you, sir.
  • Alcibiades. Now the gods keep you old enough; that you may live
    Only in bone, that none may look on you!
    I'm worse than mad: I have kept back their foes,
    While they have told their money and let out
    Their coin upon large interest, I myself
    Rich only in large hurts. All those for this?
    Is this the balsam that the usuring senate
    Pours into captains' wounds? Banishment!
    It comes not ill; I hate not to be banish'd;
    It is a cause worthy my spleen and fury,
    That I may strike at Athens. I'll cheer up
    My discontented troops, and lay for hearts.
    'Tis honour with most lands to be at odds;
    Soldiers should brook as little wrongs as gods.

    First Lord. The good time of day to you, sir.

15 III / 6
  • Upon that were my thoughts tiring, when we
    encountered: I hope it is not so...
  • Upon that were my thoughts tiring, when we
    encountered: I hope it is not so low with him as
    he made it seem in the trial of his several friends.
  • Second Lord. I also wish it to you. I think this honourable lord
    did but try us this other day.

    First Lord. Upon that were my thoughts tiring, when we
    encountered: I hope it is not so low with him as
    he made it seem in the trial of his several friends.

16 III / 6
  • I should think so: he hath sent me an earnest
    inviting, which many my near o...
  • I should think so: he hath sent me an earnest
    inviting, which many my near occasions did urge me
    to put off; but he hath conjured me beyond them, and
    I must needs appear.
  • Second Lord. It should not be, by the persuasion of his new feasting.

    First Lord. I should think so: he hath sent me an earnest
    inviting, which many my near occasions did urge me
    to put off; but he hath conjured me beyond them, and
    I must needs appear.

17 III / 6
  • I am sick of that grief too, as I understand how all
    things go.
  • I am sick of that grief too, as I understand how all
    things go.
  • Second Lord. In like manner was I in debt to my importunate
    business, but he would not hear my excuse. I am
    sorry, when he sent to borrow of me, that my
    provision was out.

    First Lord. I am sick of that grief too, as I understand how all
    things go.

18 III / 6
  • A thousand pieces.
  • A thousand pieces.
  • Second Lord. Every man here's so. What would he have borrowed of
    you?

    First Lord. A thousand pieces.

19 III / 6
  • What of you?
  • What of you?
  • Second Lord. A thousand pieces!

    First Lord. What of you?

20 III / 6
  • Ever at the best, hearing well of your lordship.
  • Ever at the best, hearing well of your lordship.
  • Timon. With all my heart, gentlemen both; and how fare you?

    First Lord. Ever at the best, hearing well of your lordship.

21 III / 6
  • I hope it remains not unkindly with your lordship
    that I returned you an emp...
  • I hope it remains not unkindly with your lordship
    that I returned you an empty messenger.
  • Timon. [Aside] Nor more willingly leaves winter; such
    summer-birds are men. Gentlemen, our dinner will not
    recompense this long stay: feast your ears with the
    music awhile, if they will fare so harshly o' the
    trumpet's sound; we shall to 't presently.

    First Lord. I hope it remains not unkindly with your lordship
    that I returned you an empty messenger.

22 III / 6
  • Royal cheer, I warrant you.
  • Royal cheer, I warrant you.
  • Second Lord. All covered dishes!

    First Lord. Royal cheer, I warrant you.

23 III / 6
  • How do you? What's the news?
  • How do you? What's the news?
  • Third Lord. Doubt not that, if money and the season can yield
    it.

    First Lord. How do you? What's the news?

24 III / 6
  • [with Second Lord] Alcibiades banished!
  • [with Second Lord] Alcibiades banished!
  • Third Lord. Alcibiades is banished: hear you of it?

    First Lord. [with Second Lord] Alcibiades banished!

25 III / 6
  • How! how!
  • How! how!
  • Third Lord. 'Tis so, be sure of it.

    First Lord. How! how!

26 III / 6
  • How now, my lords!
  • How now, my lords!
  • Timon. May you a better feast never behold,
    You knot of mouth-friends I smoke and lukewarm water
    Is your perfection. This is Timon's last;
    Who, stuck and spangled with your flatteries,
    Washes it off, and sprinkles in your faces
    Your reeking villany.
    [Throwing the water in their faces]
    Live loathed and long,
    Most smiling, smooth, detested parasites,
    Courteous destroyers, affable wolves, meek bears,
    You fools of fortune, trencher-friends, time's flies,
    Cap and knee slaves, vapours, and minute-jacks!
    Of man and beast the infinite malady
    Crust you quite o'er! What, dost thou go?
    Soft! take thy physic first--thou too--and thou;--
    Stay, I will lend thee money, borrow none.
    [Throws the dishes at them, and drives them out]
    What, all in motion? Henceforth be no feast,
    Whereat a villain's not a welcome guest.
    Burn, house! sink, Athens! henceforth hated be
    Of Timon man and all humanity!

    First Lord. How now, my lords!

27 III / 6
  • He's but a mad lord, and nought but humour sways him.
    He gave me a jewel th'...
  • He's but a mad lord, and nought but humour sways him.
    He gave me a jewel th' other day, and now he has
    beat it out of my hat: did you see my jewel?
  • Fourth Lord. I have lost my gown.

    First Lord. He's but a mad lord, and nought but humour sways him.
    He gave me a jewel th' other day, and now he has
    beat it out of my hat: did you see my jewel?

28 III / 6
  • Let's make no stay.
  • Let's make no stay.
  • Fourth Lord. Here lies my gown.

    First Lord. Let's make no stay.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.