Speeches (Lines) for First Lord in "The Winter's Tale"

Total: 14
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 II / 1
  • Behind the tuft of pines I met them; never
    Saw I men scour so on their way:...
  • Behind the tuft of pines I met them; never
    Saw I men scour so on their way: I eyed them
    Even to their ships.
  • Leontes. Was he met there? his train? Camillo with him?

    First Lord. Behind the tuft of pines I met them; never
    Saw I men scour so on their way: I eyed them
    Even to their ships.

2 II / 1
  • By his great authority;
    Which often hath no less prevail'd than so
    On yo...
  • By his great authority;
    Which often hath no less prevail'd than so
    On your command.
  • Leontes. How blest am I
    In my just censure, in my true opinion!
    Alack, for lesser knowledge! how accursed
    In being so blest! There may be in the cup
    A spider steep'd, and one may drink, depart,
    And yet partake no venom, for his knowledge
    Is not infected: but if one present
    The abhorr'd ingredient to his eye, make known
    How he hath drunk, he cracks his gorge, his sides,
    With violent hefts. I have drunk,
    and seen the spider.
    Camillo was his help in this, his pander:
    There is a plot against my life, my crown;
    All's true that is mistrusted: that false villain
    Whom I employ'd was pre-employ'd by him:
    He has discover'd my design, and I
    Remain a pinch'd thing; yea, a very trick
    For them to play at will. How came the posterns
    So easily open?

    First Lord. By his great authority;
    Which often hath no less prevail'd than so
    On your command.

3 II / 1
  • Beseech your highness, call the queen again.
  • Beseech your highness, call the queen again.
  • Leontes. Go, do our bidding; hence!

    First Lord. Beseech your highness, call the queen again.

4 II / 1
  • For her, my lord,
    I dare my life lay down and will do't, sir,
    Please you...
  • For her, my lord,
    I dare my life lay down and will do't, sir,
    Please you to accept it, that the queen is spotless
    I' the eyes of heaven and to you; I mean,
    In this which you accuse her.
  • Antigonus. Be certain what you do, sir, lest your justice
    Prove violence; in the which three great ones suffer,
    Yourself, your queen, your son.

    First Lord. For her, my lord,
    I dare my life lay down and will do't, sir,
    Please you to accept it, that the queen is spotless
    I' the eyes of heaven and to you; I mean,
    In this which you accuse her.

5 II / 1
  • Good my lord,--
  • Good my lord,--
  • Leontes. Hold your peaces.

    First Lord. Good my lord,--

6 II / 1
  • I had rather you did lack than I, my lord,
    Upon this ground; and more it wou...
  • I had rather you did lack than I, my lord,
    Upon this ground; and more it would content me
    To have her honour true than your suspicion,
    Be blamed for't how you might.
  • Leontes. What! lack I credit?

    First Lord. I had rather you did lack than I, my lord,
    Upon this ground; and more it would content me
    To have her honour true than your suspicion,
    Be blamed for't how you might.

7 II / 1
  • Well done, my lord.
  • Well done, my lord.
  • Leontes. How could that be?
    Either thou art most ignorant by age,
    Or thou wert born a fool. Camillo's flight,
    Added to their familiarity,
    Which was as gross as ever touch'd conjecture,
    That lack'd sight only, nought for approbation
    But only seeing, all other circumstances
    Made up to the deed, doth push on this proceeding:
    Yet, for a greater confirmation,
    For in an act of this importance 'twere
    Most piteous to be wild, I have dispatch'd in post
    To sacred Delphos, to Apollo's temple,
    Cleomenes and Dion, whom you know
    Of stuff'd sufficiency: now from the oracle
    They will bring all; whose spiritual counsel had,
    Shall stop or spur me. Have I done well?

    First Lord. Well done, my lord.

8 II / 3
  • You must not enter.
  • You must not enter.
  • Leontes. To see his nobleness!
    Conceiving the dishonour of his mother,
    He straight declined, droop'd, took it deeply,
    Fasten'd and fix'd the shame on't in himself,
    Threw off his spirit, his appetite, his sleep,
    And downright languish'd. Leave me solely: go,
    See how he fares.
    [Exit Servant]
    Fie, fie! no thought of him:
    The thought of my revenges that way
    Recoil upon me: in himself too mighty,
    And in his parties, his alliance; let him be
    Until a time may serve: for present vengeance,
    Take it on her. Camillo and Polixenes
    Laugh at me, make their pastime at my sorrow:
    They should not laugh if I could reach them, nor
    Shall she within my power.

    First Lord. You must not enter.

9 II / 3
  • Beseech your highness, give us better credit:
    We have always truly served yo...
  • Beseech your highness, give us better credit:
    We have always truly served you, and beseech you
    So to esteem of us, and on our knees we beg,
    As recompense of our dear services
    Past and to come, that you do change this purpose,
    Which being so horrible, so bloody, must
    Lead on to some foul issue: we all kneel.
  • Leontes. You're liars all.

    First Lord. Beseech your highness, give us better credit:
    We have always truly served you, and beseech you
    So to esteem of us, and on our knees we beg,
    As recompense of our dear services
    Past and to come, that you do change this purpose,
    Which being so horrible, so bloody, must
    Lead on to some foul issue: we all kneel.

10 II / 3
  • So please you, sir, their speed
    Hath been beyond account.
  • So please you, sir, their speed
    Hath been beyond account.
  • Servant. Please your highness, posts
    From those you sent to the oracle are come
    An hour since: Cleomenes and Dion,
    Being well arrived from Delphos, are both landed,
    Hasting to the court.

    First Lord. So please you, sir, their speed
    Hath been beyond account.

11 III / 2
  • This your request
    Is altogether just: therefore bring forth,
    And in Apol...
  • This your request
    Is altogether just: therefore bring forth,
    And in Apollos name, his oracle.
  • Hermione. Sir, spare your threats:
    The bug which you would fright me with I seek.
    To me can life be no commodity:
    The crown and comfort of my life, your favour,
    I do give lost; for I do feel it gone,
    But know not how it went. My second joy
    And first-fruits of my body, from his presence
    I am barr'd, like one infectious. My third comfort
    Starr'd most unluckily, is from my breast,
    The innocent milk in its most innocent mouth,
    Haled out to murder: myself on every post
    Proclaimed a strumpet: with immodest hatred
    The child-bed privilege denied, which 'longs
    To women of all fashion; lastly, hurried
    Here to this place, i' the open air, before
    I have got strength of limit. Now, my liege,
    Tell me what blessings I have here alive,
    That I should fear to die? Therefore proceed.
    But yet hear this: mistake me not; no life,
    I prize it not a straw, but for mine honour,
    Which I would free, if I shall be condemn'd
    Upon surmises, all proofs sleeping else
    But what your jealousies awake, I tell you
    'Tis rigor and not law. Your honours all,
    I do refer me to the oracle:
    Apollo be my judge!

    First Lord. This your request
    Is altogether just: therefore bring forth,
    And in Apollos name, his oracle.

12 III / 2
  • What fit is this, good lady?
  • What fit is this, good lady?
  • Paulina. Woe the while!
    O, cut my lace, lest my heart, cracking it,
    Break too.

    First Lord. What fit is this, good lady?

13 III / 2
  • The higher powers forbid!
  • The higher powers forbid!
  • Paulina. What studied torments, tyrant, hast for me?
    What wheels? racks? fires? what flaying? boiling?
    In leads or oils? what old or newer torture
    Must I receive, whose every word deserves
    To taste of thy most worst? Thy tyranny
    Together working with thy jealousies,
    Fancies too weak for boys, too green and idle
    For girls of nine, O, think what they have done
    And then run mad indeed, stark mad! for all
    Thy by-gone fooleries were but spices of it.
    That thou betray'dst Polixenes,'twas nothing;
    That did but show thee, of a fool, inconstant
    And damnable ingrateful: nor was't much,
    Thou wouldst have poison'd good Camillo's honour,
    To have him kill a king: poor trespasses,
    More monstrous standing by: whereof I reckon
    The casting forth to crows thy baby-daughter
    To be or none or little; though a devil
    Would have shed water out of fire ere done't:
    Nor is't directly laid to thee, the death
    Of the young prince, whose honourable thoughts,
    Thoughts high for one so tender, cleft the heart
    That could conceive a gross and foolish sire
    Blemish'd his gracious dam: this is not, no,
    Laid to thy answer: but the last,--O lords,
    When I have said, cry 'woe!' the queen, the queen,
    The sweet'st, dear'st creature's dead,
    and vengeance for't
    Not dropp'd down yet.

    First Lord. The higher powers forbid!

14 III / 2
  • Say no more:
    Howe'er the business goes, you have made fault
    I' the boldn...
  • Say no more:
    Howe'er the business goes, you have made fault
    I' the boldness of your speech.
  • Leontes. Go on, go on
    Thou canst not speak too much; I have deserved
    All tongues to talk their bitterest.

    First Lord. Say no more:
    Howe'er the business goes, you have made fault
    I' the boldness of your speech.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.