Speeches (Lines) for First Officer in "The Tragedy of Coriolanus"

Total: 4
print
# Act / Scene Speech text
1 II / 2
  • Come, come, they are almost here. How many stand
    for consulships?
  • Come, come, they are almost here. How many stand
    for consulships?
  • Sicinius Velutus. Have with you.

    First Officer. Come, come, they are almost here. How many stand
    for consulships?

2 II / 2
  • That's a brave fellow; but he's vengeance proud, and
    loves not the common pe...
  • That's a brave fellow; but he's vengeance proud, and
    loves not the common people.
  • Second Officer. Three, they say: but 'tis thought of every one
    Coriolanus will carry it.

    First Officer. That's a brave fellow; but he's vengeance proud, and
    loves not the common people.

3 II / 2
  • If he did not care whether he had their love or no,
    he waved indifferently '...
  • If he did not care whether he had their love or no,
    he waved indifferently 'twixt doing them neither
    good nor harm: but he seeks their hate with greater
    devotion than can render it him; and leaves
    nothing undone that may fully discover him their
    opposite. Now, to seem to affect the malice and
    displeasure of the people is as bad as that which he
    dislikes, to flatter them for their love.
  • Second Officer. Faith, there had been many great men that have
    flattered the people, who ne'er loved them; and there
    be many that they have loved, they know not
    wherefore: so that, if they love they know not why,
    they hate upon no better a ground: therefore, for
    Coriolanus neither to care whether they love or hate
    him manifests the true knowledge he has in their
    disposition; and out of his noble carelessness lets
    them plainly see't.

    First Officer. If he did not care whether he had their love or no,
    he waved indifferently 'twixt doing them neither
    good nor harm: but he seeks their hate with greater
    devotion than can render it him; and leaves
    nothing undone that may fully discover him their
    opposite. Now, to seem to affect the malice and
    displeasure of the people is as bad as that which he
    dislikes, to flatter them for their love.

4 II / 2
  • No more of him; he is a worthy man: make way, they
    are coming.
    [A sennet...
  • No more of him; he is a worthy man: make way, they
    are coming.
    [A sennet. Enter, with actors before them, COMINIUS]
    the consul, MENENIUS, CORIOLANUS, Senators,
    SICINIUS and BRUTUS. The Senators take their
    places; the Tribunes take their Places by
    themselves. CORIOLANUS stands]
  • Second Officer. He hath deserved worthily of his country: and his
    ascent is not by such easy degrees as those who,
    having been supple and courteous to the people,
    bonneted, without any further deed to have them at
    an into their estimation and report: but he hath so
    planted his honours in their eyes, and his actions
    in their hearts, that for their tongues to be
    silent, and not confess so much, were a kind of
    ingrateful injury; to report otherwise, were a
    malice, that, giving itself the lie, would pluck
    reproof and rebuke from every ear that heard it.

    First Officer. No more of him; he is a worthy man: make way, they
    are coming.
    [A sennet. Enter, with actors before them, COMINIUS]
    the consul, MENENIUS, CORIOLANUS, Senators,
    SICINIUS and BRUTUS. The Senators take their
    places; the Tribunes take their Places by
    themselves. CORIOLANUS stands]

© Copyright 2017-2021 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.

shakespeare_network

© Copyright 2017-2021 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.