Speeches (Lines) for First Soldier in "All's Well That Ends Well"

Total: 37
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 IV / 1
  • Good captain, let me be the interpreter.
  • Good captain, let me be the interpreter.
  • Lord E.. He can come no other way but by this hedge-corner.
    When you sally upon him, speak what terrible
    language you will: though you understand it not
    yourselves, no matter; for we must not seem to
    understand him, unless some one among us whom we
    must produce for an interpreter.

    First Soldier. Good captain, let me be the interpreter.

2 IV / 1
  • No, sir, I warrant you.
  • No, sir, I warrant you.
  • Lord E.. Art not acquainted with him? knows he not thy voice?

    First Soldier. No, sir, I warrant you.

3 IV / 1
  • E'en such as you speak to me.
  • E'en such as you speak to me.
  • Lord E.. But what linsey-woolsey hast thou to speak to us again?

    First Soldier. E'en such as you speak to me.

4 IV / 1
  • Boskos thromuldo boskos.
  • Boskos thromuldo boskos.
  • Parolles. O, ransom, ransom! do not hide mine eyes.

    First Soldier. Boskos thromuldo boskos.

5 IV / 1
  • Boskos vauvado: I understand thee, and can speak
    thy tongue. Kerely bonto, s...
  • Boskos vauvado: I understand thee, and can speak
    thy tongue. Kerely bonto, sir, betake thee to thy
    faith, for seventeen poniards are at thy bosom.
  • Parolles. I know you are the Muskos' regiment:
    And I shall lose my life for want of language;
    If there be here German, or Dane, low Dutch,
    Italian, or French, let him speak to me; I'll
    Discover that which shall undo the Florentine.

    First Soldier. Boskos vauvado: I understand thee, and can speak
    thy tongue. Kerely bonto, sir, betake thee to thy
    faith, for seventeen poniards are at thy bosom.

6 IV / 1
  • O, pray, pray, pray! Manka revania dulche.
  • O, pray, pray, pray! Manka revania dulche.
  • Parolles. O!

    First Soldier. O, pray, pray, pray! Manka revania dulche.

7 IV / 1
  • The general is content to spare thee yet;
    And, hoodwink'd as thou art, will...
  • The general is content to spare thee yet;
    And, hoodwink'd as thou art, will lead thee on
    To gather from thee: haply thou mayst inform
    Something to save thy life.
  • Lord E.. Oscorbidulchos volivorco.

    First Soldier. The general is content to spare thee yet;
    And, hoodwink'd as thou art, will lead thee on
    To gather from thee: haply thou mayst inform
    Something to save thy life.

8 IV / 1
  • But wilt thou faithfully?
  • But wilt thou faithfully?
  • Parolles. O, let me live!
    And all the secrets of our camp I'll show,
    Their force, their purposes; nay, I'll speak that
    Which you will wonder at.

    First Soldier. But wilt thou faithfully?

9 IV / 1
  • Acordo linta.
    Come on; thou art granted space.
  • Acordo linta.
    Come on; thou art granted space.
  • Parolles. If I do not, damn me.

    First Soldier. Acordo linta.
    Come on; thou art granted space.

10 IV / 3
  • He calls for the tortures: what will you say
    without 'em?
  • He calls for the tortures: what will you say
    without 'em?
  • Lord G.. Hoodman comes! Portotartarosa

    First Soldier. He calls for the tortures: what will you say
    without 'em?

11 IV / 3
  • Bosko chimurcho.
  • Bosko chimurcho.
  • Parolles. I will confess what I know without constraint: if
    ye pinch me like a pasty, I can say no more.

    First Soldier. Bosko chimurcho.

12 IV / 3
  • You are a merciful general. Our general bids you
    answer to what I shall ask...
  • You are a merciful general. Our general bids you
    answer to what I shall ask you out of a note.
  • Lord G.. Boblibindo chicurmurco.

    First Soldier. You are a merciful general. Our general bids you
    answer to what I shall ask you out of a note.

13 IV / 3
  • [Reads] 'First demand of him how many horse the
    duke is strong.' What say yo...
  • [Reads] 'First demand of him how many horse the
    duke is strong.' What say you to that?
  • Parolles. And truly, as I hope to live.

    First Soldier. [Reads] 'First demand of him how many horse the
    duke is strong.' What say you to that?

14 IV / 3
  • Shall I set down your answer so?
  • Shall I set down your answer so?
  • Parolles. Five or six thousand; but very weak and
    unserviceable: the troops are all scattered, and
    the commanders very poor rogues, upon my reputation
    and credit and as I hope to live.

    First Soldier. Shall I set down your answer so?

15 IV / 3
  • Well, that's set down.
  • Well, that's set down.
  • Lord E.. I will never trust a man again for keeping his sword
    clean. nor believe he can have every thing in him
    by wearing his apparel neatly.

    First Soldier. Well, that's set down.

16 IV / 3
  • Well, that's set down.
  • Well, that's set down.
  • Parolles. Poor rogues, I pray you, say.

    First Soldier. Well, that's set down.

17 IV / 3
  • [Reads] 'Demand of him, of what strength they are
    a-foot.' What say you to t...
  • [Reads] 'Demand of him, of what strength they are
    a-foot.' What say you to that?
  • Parolles. I humbly thank you, sir: a truth's a truth, the
    rogues are marvellous poor.

    First Soldier. [Reads] 'Demand of him, of what strength they are
    a-foot.' What say you to that?

18 IV / 3
  • Well, that's set down.
    [Reads]
    'You shall demand of him, whether one Cap...
  • Well, that's set down.
    [Reads]
    'You shall demand of him, whether one Captain Dumain
    be i' the camp, a Frenchman; what his reputation is
    with the duke; what his valour, honesty, and
    expertness in wars; or whether he thinks it were not
    possible, with well-weighing sums of gold, to
    corrupt him to revolt.' What say you to this? what
    do you know of it?
  • Lord G.. Nothing, but let him have thanks. Demand of him my
    condition, and what credit I have with the duke.

    First Soldier. Well, that's set down.
    [Reads]
    'You shall demand of him, whether one Captain Dumain
    be i' the camp, a Frenchman; what his reputation is
    with the duke; what his valour, honesty, and
    expertness in wars; or whether he thinks it were not
    possible, with well-weighing sums of gold, to
    corrupt him to revolt.' What say you to this? what
    do you know of it?

19 IV / 3
  • Do you know this Captain Dumain?
  • Do you know this Captain Dumain?
  • Parolles. I beseech you, let me answer to the particular of
    the inter'gatories: demand them singly.

    First Soldier. Do you know this Captain Dumain?

20 IV / 3
  • Well, is this captain in the duke of Florence's camp?
  • Well, is this captain in the duke of Florence's camp?
  • Bertram. Nay, by your leave, hold your hands; though I know
    his brains are forfeit to the next tile that falls.

    First Soldier. Well, is this captain in the duke of Florence's camp?

21 IV / 3
  • What is his reputation with the duke?
  • What is his reputation with the duke?
  • Lord G.. Nay look not so upon me; we shall hear of your
    lordship anon.

    First Soldier. What is his reputation with the duke?

22 IV / 3
  • Marry, we'll search.
  • Marry, we'll search.
  • Parolles. The duke knows him for no other but a poor officer
    of mine; and writ to me this other day to turn him
    out o' the band: I think I have his letter in my pocket.

    First Soldier. Marry, we'll search.

23 IV / 3
  • Here 'tis; here's a paper: shall I read it to you?
  • Here 'tis; here's a paper: shall I read it to you?
  • Parolles. In good sadness, I do not know; either it is there,
    or it is upon a file with the duke's other letters
    in my tent.

    First Soldier. Here 'tis; here's a paper: shall I read it to you?

24 IV / 3
  • [Reads] 'Dian, the count's a fool, and full of gold,'--
  • [Reads] 'Dian, the count's a fool, and full of gold,'--
  • Lord G.. Excellently.

    First Soldier. [Reads] 'Dian, the count's a fool, and full of gold,'--

25 IV / 3
  • Nay, I'll read it first, by your favour.
  • Nay, I'll read it first, by your favour.
  • Parolles. That is not the duke's letter, sir; that is an
    advertisement to a proper maid in Florence, one
    Diana, to take heed of the allurement of one Count
    Rousillon, a foolish idle boy, but for all that very
    ruttish: I pray you, sir, put it up again.

    First Soldier. Nay, I'll read it first, by your favour.

26 IV / 3
  • [Reads] 'When he swears oaths, bid him drop gold, and take it;
    After he scor...
  • [Reads] 'When he swears oaths, bid him drop gold, and take it;
    After he scores, he never pays the score:
    Half won is match well made; match, and well make it;
    He ne'er pays after-debts, take it before;
    And say a soldier, Dian, told thee this,
    Men are to mell with, boys are not to kiss:
    For count of this, the count's a fool, I know it,
    Who pays before, but not when he does owe it.
    Thine, as he vowed to thee in thine ear,
    PAROLLES.'
  • Bertram. Damnable both-sides rogue!

    First Soldier. [Reads] 'When he swears oaths, bid him drop gold, and take it;
    After he scores, he never pays the score:
    Half won is match well made; match, and well make it;
    He ne'er pays after-debts, take it before;
    And say a soldier, Dian, told thee this,
    Men are to mell with, boys are not to kiss:
    For count of this, the count's a fool, I know it,
    Who pays before, but not when he does owe it.
    Thine, as he vowed to thee in thine ear,
    PAROLLES.'

27 IV / 3
  • I perceive, sir, by the general's looks, we shall be
    fain to hang you.
  • I perceive, sir, by the general's looks, we shall be
    fain to hang you.
  • Bertram. I could endure any thing before but a cat, and now
    he's a cat to me.

    First Soldier. I perceive, sir, by the general's looks, we shall be
    fain to hang you.

28 IV / 3
  • We'll see what may be done, so you confess freely;
    therefore, once more to t...
  • We'll see what may be done, so you confess freely;
    therefore, once more to this Captain Dumain: you
    have answered to his reputation with the duke and to
    his valour: what is his honesty?
  • Parolles. My life, sir, in any case: not that I am afraid to
    die; but that, my offences being many, I would
    repent out the remainder of nature: let me live,
    sir, in a dungeon, i' the stocks, or any where, so I may live.

    First Soldier. We'll see what may be done, so you confess freely;
    therefore, once more to this Captain Dumain: you
    have answered to his reputation with the duke and to
    his valour: what is his honesty?

29 IV / 3
  • What say you to his expertness in war?
  • What say you to his expertness in war?
  • Bertram. For this description of thine honesty? A pox upon
    him for me, he's more and more a cat.

    First Soldier. What say you to his expertness in war?

30 IV / 3
  • His qualities being at this poor price, I need not
    to ask you if gold will c...
  • His qualities being at this poor price, I need not
    to ask you if gold will corrupt him to revolt.
  • Bertram. A pox on him, he's a cat still.

    First Soldier. His qualities being at this poor price, I need not
    to ask you if gold will corrupt him to revolt.

31 IV / 3
  • What's his brother, the other Captain Dumain?
  • What's his brother, the other Captain Dumain?
  • Parolles. Sir, for a quart d'ecu he will sell the fee-simple
    of his salvation, the inheritance of it; and cut the
    entail from all remainders, and a perpetual
    succession for it perpetually.

    First Soldier. What's his brother, the other Captain Dumain?

32 IV / 3
  • What's he?
  • What's he?
  • Lord E.. Why does be ask him of me?

    First Soldier. What's he?

33 IV / 3
  • If your life be saved, will you undertake to betray
    the Florentine?
  • If your life be saved, will you undertake to betray
    the Florentine?
  • Parolles. E'en a crow o' the same nest; not altogether so
    great as the first in goodness, but greater a great
    deal in evil: he excels his brother for a coward,
    yet his brother is reputed one of the best that is:
    in a retreat he outruns any lackey; marry, in coming
    on he has the cramp.

    First Soldier. If your life be saved, will you undertake to betray
    the Florentine?

34 IV / 3
  • I'll whisper with the general, and know his pleasure.
  • I'll whisper with the general, and know his pleasure.
  • Parolles. Ay, and the captain of his horse, Count Rousillon.

    First Soldier. I'll whisper with the general, and know his pleasure.

35 IV / 3
  • There is no remedy, sir, but you must die: the
    general says, you that have s...
  • There is no remedy, sir, but you must die: the
    general says, you that have so traitorously
    discovered the secrets of your army and made such
    pestiferous reports of men very nobly held, can
    serve the world for no honest use; therefore you
    must die. Come, headsman, off with his head.
  • Parolles. [Aside] I'll no more drumming; a plague of all
    drums! Only to seem to deserve well, and to
    beguile the supposition of that lascivious young boy
    the count, have I run into this danger. Yet who
    would have suspected an ambush where I was taken?

    First Soldier. There is no remedy, sir, but you must die: the
    general says, you that have so traitorously
    discovered the secrets of your army and made such
    pestiferous reports of men very nobly held, can
    serve the world for no honest use; therefore you
    must die. Come, headsman, off with his head.

36 IV / 3
  • You are undone, captain, all but your scarf; that
    has a knot on't yet
  • You are undone, captain, all but your scarf; that
    has a knot on't yet
  • Lord G.. Good captain, will you give me a copy of the sonnet
    you writ to Diana in behalf of the Count Rousillon?
    an I were not a very coward, I'ld compel it of you:
    but fare you well.

    First Soldier. You are undone, captain, all but your scarf; that
    has a knot on't yet

37 IV / 3
  • If you could find out a country where but women were
    that had received so mu...
  • If you could find out a country where but women were
    that had received so much shame, you might begin an
    impudent nation. Fare ye well, sir; I am for France
    too: we shall speak of you there.
  • Parolles. Who cannot be crushed with a plot?

    First Soldier. If you could find out a country where but women were
    that had received so much shame, you might begin an
    impudent nation. Fare ye well, sir; I am for France
    too: we shall speak of you there.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.