Speeches (Lines) for Flavius in "The Tragedy of Timon of Athens"

Total: 41
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 2
  • My lord?
  • My lord?
  • Timon. Flavius.

    Flavius. My lord?

2 I / 2
  • Yes, my lord. More jewels yet!
    There is no crossing him in 's humour;
    [A...
  • Yes, my lord. More jewels yet!
    There is no crossing him in 's humour;
    [Aside]
    Else I should tell him,--well, i' faith I should,
    When all's spent, he 'ld be cross'd then, an he could.
    'Tis pity bounty had not eyes behind,
    That man might ne'er be wretched for his mind.
  • Timon. The little casket bring me hither.

    Flavius. Yes, my lord. More jewels yet!
    There is no crossing him in 's humour;
    [Aside]
    Else I should tell him,--well, i' faith I should,
    When all's spent, he 'ld be cross'd then, an he could.
    'Tis pity bounty had not eyes behind,
    That man might ne'er be wretched for his mind.

3 I / 2
  • I beseech your honour,
    Vouchsafe me a word; it does concern you near.
  • I beseech your honour,
    Vouchsafe me a word; it does concern you near.
  • Timon. They are fairly welcome.

    Flavius. I beseech your honour,
    Vouchsafe me a word; it does concern you near.

4 I / 2
  • [Aside] I scarce know how.
  • [Aside] I scarce know how.
  • Timon. Near! why then, another time I'll hear thee:
    I prithee, let's be provided to show them
    entertainment.

    Flavius. [Aside] I scarce know how.

5 I / 2
  • [Aside] What will this come to?
    He commands us to provide, and give great gi...
  • [Aside] What will this come to?
    He commands us to provide, and give great gifts,
    And all out of an empty coffer:
    Nor will he know his purse, or yield me this,
    To show him what a beggar his heart is,
    Being of no power to make his wishes good:
    His promises fly so beyond his state
    That what he speaks is all in debt; he owes
    For every word: he is so kind that he now
    Pays interest for 't; his land's put to their books.
    Well, would I were gently put out of office
    Before I were forced out!
    Happier is he that has no friend to feed
    Than such that do e'en enemies exceed.
    I bleed inwardly for my lord.
  • Timon. I'll hunt with him; and let them be received,
    Not without fair reward.

    Flavius. [Aside] What will this come to?
    He commands us to provide, and give great gifts,
    And all out of an empty coffer:
    Nor will he know his purse, or yield me this,
    To show him what a beggar his heart is,
    Being of no power to make his wishes good:
    His promises fly so beyond his state
    That what he speaks is all in debt; he owes
    For every word: he is so kind that he now
    Pays interest for 't; his land's put to their books.
    Well, would I were gently put out of office
    Before I were forced out!
    Happier is he that has no friend to feed
    Than such that do e'en enemies exceed.
    I bleed inwardly for my lord.

6 II / 2
  • No care, no stop! so senseless of expense,
    That he will neither know how to...
  • No care, no stop! so senseless of expense,
    That he will neither know how to maintain it,
    Nor cease his flow of riot: takes no account
    How things go from him, nor resumes no care
    Of what is to continue: never mind
    Was to be so unwise, to be so kind.
    What shall be done? he will not hear, till feel:
    I must be round with him, now he comes from hunting.
    Fie, fie, fie, fie!
  • Senator. Go.

    Flavius. No care, no stop! so senseless of expense,
    That he will neither know how to maintain it,
    Nor cease his flow of riot: takes no account
    How things go from him, nor resumes no care
    Of what is to continue: never mind
    Was to be so unwise, to be so kind.
    What shall be done? he will not hear, till feel:
    I must be round with him, now he comes from hunting.
    Fie, fie, fie, fie!

7 II / 2
  • Please you, gentlemen,
    The time is unagreeable to this business:
    Your im...
  • Please you, gentlemen,
    The time is unagreeable to this business:
    Your importunacy cease till after dinner,
    That I may make his lordship understand
    Wherefore you are not paid.
  • Timon. Give me breath.
    I do beseech you, good my lords, keep on;
    I'll wait upon you instantly.
    [Exeunt ALCIBIADES and Lords]
    [To FLAVIUS]
    Come hither: pray you,
    How goes the world, that I am thus encounter'd
    With clamourous demands of date-broke bonds,
    And the detention of long-since-due debts,
    Against my honour?

    Flavius. Please you, gentlemen,
    The time is unagreeable to this business:
    Your importunacy cease till after dinner,
    That I may make his lordship understand
    Wherefore you are not paid.

8 II / 2
  • Pray, draw near.
  • Pray, draw near.
  • Timon. Do so, my friends. See them well entertain'd.

    Flavius. Pray, draw near.

9 II / 2
  • Pray you, walk near: I'll speak with you anon.
  • Pray you, walk near: I'll speak with you anon.
  • Fool. I do not always follow lover, elder brother and
    woman; sometime the philosopher.

    Flavius. Pray you, walk near: I'll speak with you anon.

10 II / 2
  • You would not hear me,
    At many leisures I proposed.
  • You would not hear me,
    At many leisures I proposed.
  • Timon. You make me marvel: wherefore ere this time
    Had you not fully laid my state before me,
    That I might so have rated my expense,
    As I had leave of means?

    Flavius. You would not hear me,
    At many leisures I proposed.

11 II / 2
  • O my good lord,
    At many times I brought in my accounts,
    Laid them before...
  • O my good lord,
    At many times I brought in my accounts,
    Laid them before you; you would throw them off,
    And say, you found them in mine honesty.
    When, for some trifling present, you have bid me
    Return so much, I have shook my head and wept;
    Yea, 'gainst the authority of manners, pray'd you
    To hold your hand more close: I did endure
    Not seldom, nor no slight cheques, when I have
    Prompted you in the ebb of your estate
    And your great flow of debts. My loved lord,
    Though you hear now, too late--yet now's a time--
    The greatest of your having lacks a half
    To pay your present debts.
  • Timon. Go to:
    Perchance some single vantages you took.
    When my indisposition put you back:
    And that unaptness made your minister,
    Thus to excuse yourself.

    Flavius. O my good lord,
    At many times I brought in my accounts,
    Laid them before you; you would throw them off,
    And say, you found them in mine honesty.
    When, for some trifling present, you have bid me
    Return so much, I have shook my head and wept;
    Yea, 'gainst the authority of manners, pray'd you
    To hold your hand more close: I did endure
    Not seldom, nor no slight cheques, when I have
    Prompted you in the ebb of your estate
    And your great flow of debts. My loved lord,
    Though you hear now, too late--yet now's a time--
    The greatest of your having lacks a half
    To pay your present debts.

12 II / 2
  • 'Tis all engaged, some forfeited and gone;
    And what remains will hardly stop...
  • 'Tis all engaged, some forfeited and gone;
    And what remains will hardly stop the mouth
    Of present dues: the future comes apace:
    What shall defend the interim? and at length
    How goes our reckoning?
  • Timon. Let all my land be sold.

    Flavius. 'Tis all engaged, some forfeited and gone;
    And what remains will hardly stop the mouth
    Of present dues: the future comes apace:
    What shall defend the interim? and at length
    How goes our reckoning?

13 II / 2
  • O my good lord, the world is but a word:
    Were it all yours to give it in a b...
  • O my good lord, the world is but a word:
    Were it all yours to give it in a breath,
    How quickly were it gone!
  • Timon. To Lacedaemon did my land extend.

    Flavius. O my good lord, the world is but a word:
    Were it all yours to give it in a breath,
    How quickly were it gone!

14 II / 2
  • If you suspect my husbandry or falsehood,
    Call me before the exactest audito...
  • If you suspect my husbandry or falsehood,
    Call me before the exactest auditors
    And set me on the proof. So the gods bless me,
    When all our offices have been oppress'd
    With riotous feeders, when our vaults have wept
    With drunken spilth of wine, when every room
    Hath blazed with lights and bray'd with minstrelsy,
    I have retired me to a wasteful cock,
    And set mine eyes at flow.
  • Timon. You tell me true.

    Flavius. If you suspect my husbandry or falsehood,
    Call me before the exactest auditors
    And set me on the proof. So the gods bless me,
    When all our offices have been oppress'd
    With riotous feeders, when our vaults have wept
    With drunken spilth of wine, when every room
    Hath blazed with lights and bray'd with minstrelsy,
    I have retired me to a wasteful cock,
    And set mine eyes at flow.

15 II / 2
  • Heavens, have I said, the bounty of this lord!
    How many prodigal bits have s...
  • Heavens, have I said, the bounty of this lord!
    How many prodigal bits have slaves and peasants
    This night englutted! Who is not Timon's?
    What heart, head, sword, force, means, but is
    Lord Timon's?
    Great Timon, noble, worthy, royal Timon!
    Ah, when the means are gone that buy this praise,
    The breath is gone whereof this praise is made:
    Feast-won, fast-lost; one cloud of winter showers,
    These flies are couch'd.
  • Timon. Prithee, no more.

    Flavius. Heavens, have I said, the bounty of this lord!
    How many prodigal bits have slaves and peasants
    This night englutted! Who is not Timon's?
    What heart, head, sword, force, means, but is
    Lord Timon's?
    Great Timon, noble, worthy, royal Timon!
    Ah, when the means are gone that buy this praise,
    The breath is gone whereof this praise is made:
    Feast-won, fast-lost; one cloud of winter showers,
    These flies are couch'd.

16 II / 2
  • Assurance bless your thoughts!
  • Assurance bless your thoughts!
  • Timon. Come, sermon me no further:
    No villanous bounty yet hath pass'd my heart;
    Unwisely, not ignobly, have I given.
    Why dost thou weep? Canst thou the conscience lack,
    To think I shall lack friends? Secure thy heart;
    If I would broach the vessels of my love,
    And try the argument of hearts by borrowing,
    Men and men's fortunes could I frankly use
    As I can bid thee speak.

    Flavius. Assurance bless your thoughts!

17 II / 2
  • [Aside] Lord Lucius and Lucullus? hum!
  • [Aside] Lord Lucius and Lucullus? hum!
  • Flaminius. As you have said, my lord.

    Flavius. [Aside] Lord Lucius and Lucullus? hum!

18 II / 2
  • I have been bold--
    For that I knew it the most general way--
    To them to...
  • I have been bold--
    For that I knew it the most general way--
    To them to use your signet and your name;
    But they do shake their heads, and I am here
    No richer in return.
  • Timon. Go you, sir, to the senators--
    Of whom, even to the state's best health, I have
    Deserved this hearing--bid 'em send o' the instant
    A thousand talents to me.

    Flavius. I have been bold--
    For that I knew it the most general way--
    To them to use your signet and your name;
    But they do shake their heads, and I am here
    No richer in return.

19 II / 2
  • They answer, in a joint and corporate voice,
    That now they are at fall, want...
  • They answer, in a joint and corporate voice,
    That now they are at fall, want treasure, cannot
    Do what they would; are sorry--you are honourable,--
    But yet they could have wish'd--they know not--
    Something hath been amiss--a noble nature
    May catch a wrench--would all were well--'tis pity;--
    And so, intending other serious matters,
    After distasteful looks and these hard fractions,
    With certain half-caps and cold-moving nods
    They froze me into silence.
  • Timon. Is't true? can't be?

    Flavius. They answer, in a joint and corporate voice,
    That now they are at fall, want treasure, cannot
    Do what they would; are sorry--you are honourable,--
    But yet they could have wish'd--they know not--
    Something hath been amiss--a noble nature
    May catch a wrench--would all were well--'tis pity;--
    And so, intending other serious matters,
    After distasteful looks and these hard fractions,
    With certain half-caps and cold-moving nods
    They froze me into silence.

20 II / 2
  • I would I could not think it: that thought is
    bounty's foe;
    Being free i...
  • I would I could not think it: that thought is
    bounty's foe;
    Being free itself, it thinks all others so.
  • Timon. You gods, reward them!
    Prithee, man, look cheerly. These old fellows
    Have their ingratitude in them hereditary:
    Their blood is caked, 'tis cold, it seldom flows;
    'Tis lack of kindly warmth they are not kind;
    And nature, as it grows again toward earth,
    Is fashion'd for the journey, dull and heavy.
    [To a Servant]
    Go to Ventidius.
    [To FLAVIUS]
    Prithee, be not sad,
    Thou art true and honest; ingeniously I speak.
    No blame belongs to thee.
    [To Servant]
    Ventidius lately
    Buried his father; by whose death he's stepp'd
    Into a great estate: when he was poor,
    Imprison'd and in scarcity of friends,
    I clear'd him with five talents: greet him from me;
    Bid him suppose some good necessity
    Touches his friend, which craves to be remember'd
    With those five talents.
    [Exit Servant]
    [To FLAVIUS]
    That had, give't these fellows
    To whom 'tis instant due. Ne'er speak, or think,
    That Timon's fortunes 'mong his friends can sink.

    Flavius. I would I could not think it: that thought is
    bounty's foe;
    Being free itself, it thinks all others so.

21 III / 4
  • What do ye ask of me, my friend?
  • What do ye ask of me, my friend?
  • Second Servant. By your leave, sir,--

    Flavius. What do ye ask of me, my friend?

22 III / 4
  • Ay,
    If money were as certain as your waiting,
    'Twere sure enough.
    Wh...
  • Ay,
    If money were as certain as your waiting,
    'Twere sure enough.
    Why then preferr'd you not your sums and bills,
    When your false masters eat of my lord's meat?
    Then they could smile and fawn upon his debts
    And take down the interest into their
    gluttonous maws.
    You do yourselves but wrong to stir me up;
    Let me pass quietly:
    Believe 't, my lord and I have made an end;
    I have no more to reckon, he to spend.
  • Titus. We wait for certain money here, sir.

    Flavius. Ay,
    If money were as certain as your waiting,
    'Twere sure enough.
    Why then preferr'd you not your sums and bills,
    When your false masters eat of my lord's meat?
    Then they could smile and fawn upon his debts
    And take down the interest into their
    gluttonous maws.
    You do yourselves but wrong to stir me up;
    Let me pass quietly:
    Believe 't, my lord and I have made an end;
    I have no more to reckon, he to spend.

23 III / 4
  • If 'twill not serve,'tis not so base as you;
    For you serve knaves.
  • If 'twill not serve,'tis not so base as you;
    For you serve knaves.
  • Flavius. Ay,
    If money were as certain as your waiting,
    'Twere sure enough.
    Why then preferr'd you not your sums and bills,
    When your false masters eat of my lord's meat?
    Then they could smile and fawn upon his debts
    And take down the interest into their
    gluttonous maws.
    You do yourselves but wrong to stir me up;
    Let me pass quietly:
    Believe 't, my lord and I have made an end;
    I have no more to reckon, he to spend.

    Flavius. If 'twill not serve,'tis not so base as you;
    For you serve knaves.

24 III / 4
  • My dear lord,--
  • My dear lord,--
  • Timon. They have e'en put my breath from me, the slaves.
    Creditors? devils!

    Flavius. My dear lord,--

25 III / 4
  • My lord,--
  • My lord,--
  • Timon. What if it should be so?

    Flavius. My lord,--

26 III / 4
  • Here, my lord.
  • Here, my lord.
  • Timon. I'll have it so. My steward!

    Flavius. Here, my lord.

27 III / 4
  • O my lord,
    You only speak from your distracted soul;
    There is not so muc...
  • O my lord,
    You only speak from your distracted soul;
    There is not so much left, to furnish out
    A moderate table.
  • Timon. So fitly? Go, bid all my friends again,
    Lucius, Lucullus, and Sempronius:
    All, sirrah, all:
    I'll once more feast the rascals.

    Flavius. O my lord,
    You only speak from your distracted soul;
    There is not so much left, to furnish out
    A moderate table.

28 IV / 2
  • Alack, my fellows, what should I say to you?
    Let me be recorded by the right...
  • Alack, my fellows, what should I say to you?
    Let me be recorded by the righteous gods,
    I am as poor as you.
  • First Servant. Hear you, master steward, where's our master?
    Are we undone? cast off? nothing remaining?

    Flavius. Alack, my fellows, what should I say to you?
    Let me be recorded by the righteous gods,
    I am as poor as you.

29 IV / 2
  • All broken implements of a ruin'd house.
  • All broken implements of a ruin'd house.
  • Second Servant. As we do turn our backs
    From our companion thrown into his grave,
    So his familiars to his buried fortunes
    Slink all away, leave their false vows with him,
    Like empty purses pick'd; and his poor self,
    A dedicated beggar to the air,
    With his disease of all-shunn'd poverty,
    Walks, like contempt, alone. More of our fellows.

    Flavius. All broken implements of a ruin'd house.

30 IV / 2
  • Good fellows all,
    The latest of my wealth I'll share amongst you.
    Wherev...
  • Good fellows all,
    The latest of my wealth I'll share amongst you.
    Wherever we shall meet, for Timon's sake,
    Let's yet be fellows; let's shake our heads, and say,
    As 'twere a knell unto our master's fortunes,
    'We have seen better days.' Let each take some;
    Nay, put out all your hands. Not one word more:
    Thus part we rich in sorrow, parting poor.
    [Servants embrace, and part several ways]
    O, the fierce wretchedness that glory brings us!
    Who would not wish to be from wealth exempt,
    Since riches point to misery and contempt?
    Who would be so mock'd with glory? or to live
    But in a dream of friendship?
    To have his pomp and all what state compounds
    But only painted, like his varnish'd friends?
    Poor honest lord, brought low by his own heart,
    Undone by goodness! Strange, unusual blood,
    When man's worst sin is, he does too much good!
    Who, then, dares to be half so kind again?
    For bounty, that makes gods, does still mar men.
    My dearest lord, bless'd, to be most accursed,
    Rich, only to be wretched, thy great fortunes
    Are made thy chief afflictions. Alas, kind lord!
    He's flung in rage from this ingrateful seat
    Of monstrous friends, nor has he with him to
    Supply his life, or that which can command it.
    I'll follow and inquire him out:
    I'll ever serve his mind with my best will;
    Whilst I have gold, I'll be his steward still.
  • Third Servant. Yet do our hearts wear Timon's livery;
    That see I by our faces; we are fellows still,
    Serving alike in sorrow: leak'd is our bark,
    And we, poor mates, stand on the dying deck,
    Hearing the surges threat: we must all part
    Into this sea of air.

    Flavius. Good fellows all,
    The latest of my wealth I'll share amongst you.
    Wherever we shall meet, for Timon's sake,
    Let's yet be fellows; let's shake our heads, and say,
    As 'twere a knell unto our master's fortunes,
    'We have seen better days.' Let each take some;
    Nay, put out all your hands. Not one word more:
    Thus part we rich in sorrow, parting poor.
    [Servants embrace, and part several ways]
    O, the fierce wretchedness that glory brings us!
    Who would not wish to be from wealth exempt,
    Since riches point to misery and contempt?
    Who would be so mock'd with glory? or to live
    But in a dream of friendship?
    To have his pomp and all what state compounds
    But only painted, like his varnish'd friends?
    Poor honest lord, brought low by his own heart,
    Undone by goodness! Strange, unusual blood,
    When man's worst sin is, he does too much good!
    Who, then, dares to be half so kind again?
    For bounty, that makes gods, does still mar men.
    My dearest lord, bless'd, to be most accursed,
    Rich, only to be wretched, thy great fortunes
    Are made thy chief afflictions. Alas, kind lord!
    He's flung in rage from this ingrateful seat
    Of monstrous friends, nor has he with him to
    Supply his life, or that which can command it.
    I'll follow and inquire him out:
    I'll ever serve his mind with my best will;
    Whilst I have gold, I'll be his steward still.

31 IV / 3
  • O you gods!
    Is yond despised and ruinous man my lord?
    Full of decay and...
  • O you gods!
    Is yond despised and ruinous man my lord?
    Full of decay and failing? O monument
    And wonder of good deeds evilly bestow'd!
    What an alteration of honour
    Has desperate want made!
    What viler thing upon the earth than friends
    Who can bring noblest minds to basest ends!
    How rarely does it meet with this time's guise,
    When man was wish'd to love his enemies!
    Grant I may ever love, and rather woo
    Those that would mischief me than those that do!
    Has caught me in his eye: I will present
    My honest grief unto him; and, as my lord,
    Still serve him with my life. My dearest master!
  • First Bandit. Let us first see peace in Athens: there is no time
    so miserable but a man may be true.

    Flavius. O you gods!
    Is yond despised and ruinous man my lord?
    Full of decay and failing? O monument
    And wonder of good deeds evilly bestow'd!
    What an alteration of honour
    Has desperate want made!
    What viler thing upon the earth than friends
    Who can bring noblest minds to basest ends!
    How rarely does it meet with this time's guise,
    When man was wish'd to love his enemies!
    Grant I may ever love, and rather woo
    Those that would mischief me than those that do!
    Has caught me in his eye: I will present
    My honest grief unto him; and, as my lord,
    Still serve him with my life. My dearest master!

32 IV / 3
  • Have you forgot me, sir?
  • Have you forgot me, sir?
  • Timon. Away! what art thou?

    Flavius. Have you forgot me, sir?

33 IV / 3
  • An honest poor servant of yours.
  • An honest poor servant of yours.
  • Timon. Why dost ask that? I have forgot all men;
    Then, if thou grant'st thou'rt a man, I have forgot thee.

    Flavius. An honest poor servant of yours.

34 IV / 3
  • The gods are witness,
    Ne'er did poor steward wear a truer grief
    For his...
  • The gods are witness,
    Ne'er did poor steward wear a truer grief
    For his undone lord than mine eyes for you.
  • Timon. Then I know thee not:
    I never had honest man about me, I; all
    I kept were knaves, to serve in meat to villains.

    Flavius. The gods are witness,
    Ne'er did poor steward wear a truer grief
    For his undone lord than mine eyes for you.

35 IV / 3
  • I beg of you to know me, good my lord,
    To accept my grief and whilst this po...
  • I beg of you to know me, good my lord,
    To accept my grief and whilst this poor wealth lasts
    To entertain me as your steward still.
  • Timon. What, dost thou weep? Come nearer. Then I
    love thee,
    Because thou art a woman, and disclaim'st
    Flinty mankind; whose eyes do never give
    But thorough lust and laughter. Pity's sleeping:
    Strange times, that weep with laughing, not with weeping!

    Flavius. I beg of you to know me, good my lord,
    To accept my grief and whilst this poor wealth lasts
    To entertain me as your steward still.

36 IV / 3
  • No, my most worthy master; in whose breast
    Doubt and suspect, alas, are plac...
  • No, my most worthy master; in whose breast
    Doubt and suspect, alas, are placed too late:
    You should have fear'd false times when you did feast:
    Suspect still comes where an estate is least.
    That which I show, heaven knows, is merely love,
    Duty and zeal to your unmatched mind,
    Care of your food and living; and, believe it,
    My most honour'd lord,
    For any benefit that points to me,
    Either in hope or present, I'ld exchange
    For this one wish, that you had power and wealth
    To requite me, by making rich yourself.
  • Timon. Had I a steward
    So true, so just, and now so comfortable?
    It almost turns my dangerous nature mild.
    Let me behold thy face. Surely, this man
    Was born of woman.
    Forgive my general and exceptless rashness,
    You perpetual-sober gods! I do proclaim
    One honest man--mistake me not--but one;
    No more, I pray,--and he's a steward.
    How fain would I have hated all mankind!
    And thou redeem'st thyself: but all, save thee,
    I fell with curses.
    Methinks thou art more honest now than wise;
    For, by oppressing and betraying me,
    Thou mightst have sooner got another service:
    For many so arrive at second masters,
    Upon their first lord's neck. But tell me true--
    For I must ever doubt, though ne'er so sure--
    Is not thy kindness subtle, covetous,
    If not a usuring kindness, and, as rich men deal gifts,
    Expecting in return twenty for one?

    Flavius. No, my most worthy master; in whose breast
    Doubt and suspect, alas, are placed too late:
    You should have fear'd false times when you did feast:
    Suspect still comes where an estate is least.
    That which I show, heaven knows, is merely love,
    Duty and zeal to your unmatched mind,
    Care of your food and living; and, believe it,
    My most honour'd lord,
    For any benefit that points to me,
    Either in hope or present, I'ld exchange
    For this one wish, that you had power and wealth
    To requite me, by making rich yourself.

37 IV / 3
  • O, let me stay,
    And comfort you, my master.
  • O, let me stay,
    And comfort you, my master.
  • Timon. Look thee, 'tis so! Thou singly honest man,
    Here, take: the gods out of my misery
    Have sent thee treasure. Go, live rich and happy;
    But thus condition'd: thou shalt build from men;
    Hate all, curse all, show charity to none,
    But let the famish'd flesh slide from the bone,
    Ere thou relieve the beggar; give to dogs
    What thou deny'st to men; let prisons swallow 'em,
    Debts wither 'em to nothing; be men like
    blasted woods,
    And may diseases lick up their false bloods!
    And so farewell and thrive.

    Flavius. O, let me stay,
    And comfort you, my master.

38 V / 1
  • It is in vain that you would speak with Timon;
    For he is set so only to hims...
  • It is in vain that you would speak with Timon;
    For he is set so only to himself
    That nothing but himself which looks like man
    Is friendly with him.
  • Timon. You that way and you this, but two in company;
    Each man apart, all single and alone,
    Yet an arch-villain keeps him company.
    If where thou art two villains shall not be,
    Come not near him. If thou wouldst not reside
    But where one villain is, then him abandon.
    Hence, pack! there's gold; you came for gold, ye slaves:
    [To Painter]
    You have work'd for me; there's payment for you: hence!
    [To Poet]
    You are an alchemist; make gold of that.
    Out, rascal dogs!

    Flavius. It is in vain that you would speak with Timon;
    For he is set so only to himself
    That nothing but himself which looks like man
    Is friendly with him.

39 V / 1
  • Here is his cave.
    Peace and content be here! Lord Timon! Timon!
    Look out...
  • Here is his cave.
    Peace and content be here! Lord Timon! Timon!
    Look out, and speak to friends: the Athenians,
    By two of their most reverend senate, greet thee:
    Speak to them, noble Timon.
  • Second Senator. At all times alike
    Men are not still the same: 'twas time and griefs
    That framed him thus: time, with his fairer hand,
    Offering the fortunes of his former days,
    The former man may make him. Bring us to him,
    And chance it as it may.

    Flavius. Here is his cave.
    Peace and content be here! Lord Timon! Timon!
    Look out, and speak to friends: the Athenians,
    By two of their most reverend senate, greet thee:
    Speak to them, noble Timon.

40 V / 1
  • Stay not, all's in vain.
  • Stay not, all's in vain.
  • Timon. Well, sir, I will; therefore, I will, sir; thus:
    If Alcibiades kill my countrymen,
    Let Alcibiades know this of Timon,
    That Timon cares not. But if be sack fair Athens,
    And take our goodly aged men by the beards,
    Giving our holy virgins to the stain
    Of contumelious, beastly, mad-brain'd war,
    Then let him know, and tell him Timon speaks it,
    In pity of our aged and our youth,
    I cannot choose but tell him, that I care not,
    And let him take't at worst; for their knives care not,
    While you have throats to answer: for myself,
    There's not a whittle in the unruly camp
    But I do prize it at my love before
    The reverend'st throat in Athens. So I leave you
    To the protection of the prosperous gods,
    As thieves to keepers.

    Flavius. Stay not, all's in vain.

41 V / 1
  • Trouble him no further; thus you still shall find him.
  • Trouble him no further; thus you still shall find him.
  • Timon. I have a tree, which grows here in my close,
    That mine own use invites me to cut down,
    And shortly must I fell it: tell my friends,
    Tell Athens, in the sequence of degree
    From high to low throughout, that whoso please
    To stop affliction, let him take his haste,
    Come hither, ere my tree hath felt the axe,
    And hang himself. I pray you, do my greeting.

    Flavius. Trouble him no further; thus you still shall find him.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.