Speeches (Lines) for Florizel in "The Winter's Tale"

Total: 45
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 IV / 4
  • These your unusual weeds to each part of you
    Do give a life: no shepherdess,...
  • These your unusual weeds to each part of you
    Do give a life: no shepherdess, but Flora
    Peering in April's front. This your sheep-shearing
    Is as a meeting of the petty gods,
    And you the queen on't.
  • Autolycus. Prosper you, sweet sir!
    [Exit Clown]
    Your purse is not hot enough to purchase your spice.
    I'll be with you at your sheep-shearing too: if I
    make not this cheat bring out another and the
    shearers prove sheep, let me be unrolled and my name
    put in the book of virtue!
    [Sings]
    Jog on, jog on, the foot-path way,
    And merrily hent the stile-a:
    A merry heart goes all the day,
    Your sad tires in a mile-a.

    Florizel. These your unusual weeds to each part of you
    Do give a life: no shepherdess, but Flora
    Peering in April's front. This your sheep-shearing
    Is as a meeting of the petty gods,
    And you the queen on't.

2 IV / 4
  • I bless the time
    When my good falcon made her flight across
    Thy father's...
  • I bless the time
    When my good falcon made her flight across
    Thy father's ground.
  • Perdita. Sir, my gracious lord,
    To chide at your extremes it not becomes me:
    O, pardon, that I name them! Your high self,
    The gracious mark o' the land, you have obscured
    With a swain's wearing, and me, poor lowly maid,
    Most goddess-like prank'd up: but that our feasts
    In every mess have folly and the feeders
    Digest it with a custom, I should blush
    To see you so attired, sworn, I think,
    To show myself a glass.

    Florizel. I bless the time
    When my good falcon made her flight across
    Thy father's ground.

3 IV / 4
  • Apprehend
    Nothing but jollity. The gods themselves,
    Humbling their deiti...
  • Apprehend
    Nothing but jollity. The gods themselves,
    Humbling their deities to love, have taken
    The shapes of beasts upon them: Jupiter
    Became a bull, and bellow'd; the green Neptune
    A ram, and bleated; and the fire-robed god,
    Golden Apollo, a poor humble swain,
    As I seem now. Their transformations
    Were never for a piece of beauty rarer,
    Nor in a way so chaste, since my desires
    Run not before mine honour, nor my lusts
    Burn hotter than my faith.
  • Perdita. Now Jove afford you cause!
    To me the difference forges dread; your greatness
    Hath not been used to fear. Even now I tremble
    To think your father, by some accident,
    Should pass this way as you did: O, the Fates!
    How would he look, to see his work so noble
    Vilely bound up? What would he say? Or how
    Should I, in these my borrow'd flaunts, behold
    The sternness of his presence?

    Florizel. Apprehend
    Nothing but jollity. The gods themselves,
    Humbling their deities to love, have taken
    The shapes of beasts upon them: Jupiter
    Became a bull, and bellow'd; the green Neptune
    A ram, and bleated; and the fire-robed god,
    Golden Apollo, a poor humble swain,
    As I seem now. Their transformations
    Were never for a piece of beauty rarer,
    Nor in a way so chaste, since my desires
    Run not before mine honour, nor my lusts
    Burn hotter than my faith.

4 IV / 4
  • Thou dearest Perdita,
    With these forced thoughts, I prithee, darken not
    ...
  • Thou dearest Perdita,
    With these forced thoughts, I prithee, darken not
    The mirth o' the feast. Or I'll be thine, my fair,
    Or not my father's. For I cannot be
    Mine own, nor any thing to any, if
    I be not thine. To this I am most constant,
    Though destiny say no. Be merry, gentle;
    Strangle such thoughts as these with any thing
    That you behold the while. Your guests are coming:
    Lift up your countenance, as it were the day
    Of celebration of that nuptial which
    We two have sworn shall come.
  • Perdita. O, but, sir,
    Your resolution cannot hold, when 'tis
    Opposed, as it must be, by the power of the king:
    One of these two must be necessities,
    Which then will speak, that you must
    change this purpose,
    Or I my life.

    Florizel. Thou dearest Perdita,
    With these forced thoughts, I prithee, darken not
    The mirth o' the feast. Or I'll be thine, my fair,
    Or not my father's. For I cannot be
    Mine own, nor any thing to any, if
    I be not thine. To this I am most constant,
    Though destiny say no. Be merry, gentle;
    Strangle such thoughts as these with any thing
    That you behold the while. Your guests are coming:
    Lift up your countenance, as it were the day
    Of celebration of that nuptial which
    We two have sworn shall come.

5 IV / 4
  • See, your guests approach:
    Address yourself to entertain them sprightly,
  • See, your guests approach:
    Address yourself to entertain them sprightly,
    And let's be red with mirth.
    [Enter Shepherd, Clown, MOPSA, DORCAS, and]
    others, with POLIXENES and CAMILLO disguised]
  • Perdita. O lady Fortune,
    Stand you auspicious!

    Florizel. See, your guests approach:
    Address yourself to entertain them sprightly,
    And let's be red with mirth.
    [Enter Shepherd, Clown, MOPSA, DORCAS, and]
    others, with POLIXENES and CAMILLO disguised]

6 IV / 4
  • What, like a corse?
  • What, like a corse?
  • Perdita. Out, alas!
    You'd be so lean, that blasts of January
    Would blow you through and through.
    Now, my fair'st friend,
    I would I had some flowers o' the spring that might
    Become your time of day; and yours, and yours,
    That wear upon your virgin branches yet
    Your maidenheads growing: O Proserpina,
    For the flowers now, that frighted thou let'st fall
    From Dis's waggon! daffodils,
    That come before the swallow dares, and take
    The winds of March with beauty; violets dim,
    But sweeter than the lids of Juno's eyes
    Or Cytherea's breath; pale primroses
    That die unmarried, ere they can behold
    Bight Phoebus in his strength--a malady
    Most incident to maids; bold oxlips and
    The crown imperial; lilies of all kinds,
    The flower-de-luce being one! O, these I lack,
    To make you garlands of, and my sweet friend,
    To strew him o'er and o'er!

    Florizel. What, like a corse?

7 IV / 4
  • What you do
    Still betters what is done. When you speak, sweet.
    I'ld have...
  • What you do
    Still betters what is done. When you speak, sweet.
    I'ld have you do it ever: when you sing,
    I'ld have you buy and sell so, so give alms,
    Pray so; and, for the ordering your affairs,
    To sing them too: when you do dance, I wish you
    A wave o' the sea, that you might ever do
    Nothing but that; move still, still so,
    And own no other function: each your doing,
    So singular in each particular,
    Crowns what you are doing in the present deed,
    That all your acts are queens.
  • Perdita. No, like a bank for love to lie and play on;
    Not like a corse; or if, not to be buried,
    But quick and in mine arms. Come, take your flowers:
    Methinks I play as I have seen them do
    In Whitsun pastorals: sure this robe of mine
    Does change my disposition.

    Florizel. What you do
    Still betters what is done. When you speak, sweet.
    I'ld have you do it ever: when you sing,
    I'ld have you buy and sell so, so give alms,
    Pray so; and, for the ordering your affairs,
    To sing them too: when you do dance, I wish you
    A wave o' the sea, that you might ever do
    Nothing but that; move still, still so,
    And own no other function: each your doing,
    So singular in each particular,
    Crowns what you are doing in the present deed,
    That all your acts are queens.

8 IV / 4
  • I think you have
    As little skill to fear as I have purpose
    To put you to...
  • I think you have
    As little skill to fear as I have purpose
    To put you to't. But come; our dance, I pray:
    Your hand, my Perdita: so turtles pair,
    That never mean to part.
  • Perdita. O Doricles,
    Your praises are too large: but that your youth,
    And the true blood which peepeth fairly through't,
    Do plainly give you out an unstain'd shepherd,
    With wisdom I might fear, my Doricles,
    You woo'd me the false way.

    Florizel. I think you have
    As little skill to fear as I have purpose
    To put you to't. But come; our dance, I pray:
    Your hand, my Perdita: so turtles pair,
    That never mean to part.

9 IV / 4
  • Old sir, I know
    She prizes not such trifles as these are:
    The gifts she...
  • Old sir, I know
    She prizes not such trifles as these are:
    The gifts she looks from me are pack'd and lock'd
    Up in my heart; which I have given already,
    But not deliver'd. O, hear me breathe my life
    Before this ancient sir, who, it should seem,
    Hath sometime loved! I take thy hand, this hand,
    As soft as dove's down and as white as it,
    Or Ethiopian's tooth, or the fann'd
    snow that's bolted
    By the northern blasts twice o'er.
  • Polixenes. O, father, you'll know more of that hereafter.
    [To CAMILLO]
    Is it not too far gone? 'Tis time to part them.
    He's simple and tells much.
    [To FLORIZEL]
    How now, fair shepherd!
    Your heart is full of something that does take
    Your mind from feasting. Sooth, when I was young
    And handed love as you do, I was wont
    To load my she with knacks: I would have ransack'd
    The pedlar's silken treasury and have pour'd it
    To her acceptance; you have let him go
    And nothing marted with him. If your lass
    Interpretation should abuse and call this
    Your lack of love or bounty, you were straited
    For a reply, at least if you make a care
    Of happy holding her.

    Florizel. Old sir, I know
    She prizes not such trifles as these are:
    The gifts she looks from me are pack'd and lock'd
    Up in my heart; which I have given already,
    But not deliver'd. O, hear me breathe my life
    Before this ancient sir, who, it should seem,
    Hath sometime loved! I take thy hand, this hand,
    As soft as dove's down and as white as it,
    Or Ethiopian's tooth, or the fann'd
    snow that's bolted
    By the northern blasts twice o'er.

10 IV / 4
  • Do, and be witness to 't.
  • Do, and be witness to 't.
  • Polixenes. What follows this?
    How prettily the young swain seems to wash
    The hand was fair before! I have put you out:
    But to your protestation; let me hear
    What you profess.

    Florizel. Do, and be witness to 't.

11 IV / 4
  • And he, and more
    Than he, and men, the earth, the heavens, and all:
    That...
  • And he, and more
    Than he, and men, the earth, the heavens, and all:
    That, were I crown'd the most imperial monarch,
    Thereof most worthy, were I the fairest youth
    That ever made eye swerve, had force and knowledge
    More than was ever man's, I would not prize them
    Without her love; for her employ them all;
    Commend them and condemn them to her service
    Or to their own perdition.
  • Polixenes. And this my neighbour too?

    Florizel. And he, and more
    Than he, and men, the earth, the heavens, and all:
    That, were I crown'd the most imperial monarch,
    Thereof most worthy, were I the fairest youth
    That ever made eye swerve, had force and knowledge
    More than was ever man's, I would not prize them
    Without her love; for her employ them all;
    Commend them and condemn them to her service
    Or to their own perdition.

12 IV / 4
  • O, that must be
    I' the virtue of your daughter: one being dead,
    I shall...
  • O, that must be
    I' the virtue of your daughter: one being dead,
    I shall have more than you can dream of yet;
    Enough then for your wonder. But, come on,
    Contract us 'fore these witnesses.
  • Old Shepherd. Take hands, a bargain!
    And, friends unknown, you shall bear witness to 't:
    I give my daughter to him, and will make
    Her portion equal his.

    Florizel. O, that must be
    I' the virtue of your daughter: one being dead,
    I shall have more than you can dream of yet;
    Enough then for your wonder. But, come on,
    Contract us 'fore these witnesses.

13 IV / 4
  • I have: but what of him?
  • I have: but what of him?
  • Polixenes. Soft, swain, awhile, beseech you;
    Have you a father?

    Florizel. I have: but what of him?

14 IV / 4
  • He neither does nor shall.
  • He neither does nor shall.
  • Polixenes. Knows he of this?

    Florizel. He neither does nor shall.

15 IV / 4
  • No, good sir;
    He has his health and ampler strength indeed
    Than most hav...
  • No, good sir;
    He has his health and ampler strength indeed
    Than most have of his age.
  • Polixenes. Methinks a father
    Is at the nuptial of his son a guest
    That best becomes the table. Pray you once more,
    Is not your father grown incapable
    Of reasonable affairs? is he not stupid
    With age and altering rheums? can he speak? hear?
    Know man from man? dispute his own estate?
    Lies he not bed-rid? and again does nothing
    But what he did being childish?

    Florizel. No, good sir;
    He has his health and ampler strength indeed
    Than most have of his age.

16 IV / 4
  • I yield all this;
    But for some other reasons, my grave sir,
    Which 'tis n...
  • I yield all this;
    But for some other reasons, my grave sir,
    Which 'tis not fit you know, I not acquaint
    My father of this business.
  • Polixenes. By my white beard,
    You offer him, if this be so, a wrong
    Something unfilial: reason my son
    Should choose himself a wife, but as good reason
    The father, all whose joy is nothing else
    But fair posterity, should hold some counsel
    In such a business.

    Florizel. I yield all this;
    But for some other reasons, my grave sir,
    Which 'tis not fit you know, I not acquaint
    My father of this business.

17 IV / 4
  • He shall not.
  • He shall not.
  • Polixenes. Let him know't.

    Florizel. He shall not.

18 IV / 4
  • No, he must not.
  • No, he must not.
  • Polixenes. Prithee, let him.

    Florizel. No, he must not.

19 IV / 4
  • Come, come, he must not.
    Mark our contract.
  • Come, come, he must not.
    Mark our contract.
  • Old Shepherd. Let him, my son: he shall not need to grieve
    At knowing of thy choice.

    Florizel. Come, come, he must not.
    Mark our contract.

20 IV / 4
  • Why look you so upon me?
    I am but sorry, not afeard; delay'd,
    But nothin...
  • Why look you so upon me?
    I am but sorry, not afeard; delay'd,
    But nothing alter'd: what I was, I am;
    More straining on for plucking back, not following
    My leash unwillingly.
  • Old Shepherd. I cannot speak, nor think
    Nor dare to know that which I know. O sir!
    You have undone a man of fourscore three,
    That thought to fill his grave in quiet, yea,
    To die upon the bed my father died,
    To lie close by his honest bones: but now
    Some hangman must put on my shroud and lay me
    Where no priest shovels in dust. O cursed wretch,
    That knew'st this was the prince,
    and wouldst adventure
    To mingle faith with him! Undone! undone!
    If I might die within this hour, I have lived
    To die when I desire.

    Florizel. Why look you so upon me?
    I am but sorry, not afeard; delay'd,
    But nothing alter'd: what I was, I am;
    More straining on for plucking back, not following
    My leash unwillingly.

21 IV / 4
  • I not purpose it.
    I think, Camillo?
  • I not purpose it.
    I think, Camillo?
  • Camillo. Gracious my lord,
    You know your father's temper: at this time
    He will allow no speech, which I do guess
    You do not purpose to him; and as hardly
    Will he endure your sight as yet, I fear:
    Then, till the fury of his highness settle,
    Come not before him.

    Florizel. I not purpose it.
    I think, Camillo?

22 IV / 4
  • It cannot fail but by
    The violation of my faith; and then
    Let nature cru...
  • It cannot fail but by
    The violation of my faith; and then
    Let nature crush the sides o' the earth together
    And mar the seeds within! Lift up thy looks:
    From my succession wipe me, father; I
    Am heir to my affection.
  • Perdita. How often have I told you 'twould be thus!
    How often said, my dignity would last
    But till 'twere known!

    Florizel. It cannot fail but by
    The violation of my faith; and then
    Let nature crush the sides o' the earth together
    And mar the seeds within! Lift up thy looks:
    From my succession wipe me, father; I
    Am heir to my affection.

23 IV / 4
  • I am, and by my fancy: if my reason
    Will thereto be obedient, I have reason;...
  • I am, and by my fancy: if my reason
    Will thereto be obedient, I have reason;
    If not, my senses, better pleased with madness,
    Do bid it welcome.
  • Camillo. Be advised.

    Florizel. I am, and by my fancy: if my reason
    Will thereto be obedient, I have reason;
    If not, my senses, better pleased with madness,
    Do bid it welcome.

24 IV / 4
  • So call it: but it does fulfil my vow;
    I needs must think it honesty. Camill...
  • So call it: but it does fulfil my vow;
    I needs must think it honesty. Camillo,
    Not for Bohemia, nor the pomp that may
    Be thereat glean'd, for all the sun sees or
    The close earth wombs or the profound sea hides
    In unknown fathoms, will I break my oath
    To this my fair beloved: therefore, I pray you,
    As you have ever been my father's honour'd friend,
    When he shall miss me,--as, in faith, I mean not
    To see him any more,--cast your good counsels
    Upon his passion; let myself and fortune
    Tug for the time to come. This you may know
    And so deliver, I am put to sea
    With her whom here I cannot hold on shore;
    And most opportune to our need I have
    A vessel rides fast by, but not prepared
    For this design. What course I mean to hold
    Shall nothing benefit your knowledge, nor
    Concern me the reporting.
  • Camillo. This is desperate, sir.

    Florizel. So call it: but it does fulfil my vow;
    I needs must think it honesty. Camillo,
    Not for Bohemia, nor the pomp that may
    Be thereat glean'd, for all the sun sees or
    The close earth wombs or the profound sea hides
    In unknown fathoms, will I break my oath
    To this my fair beloved: therefore, I pray you,
    As you have ever been my father's honour'd friend,
    When he shall miss me,--as, in faith, I mean not
    To see him any more,--cast your good counsels
    Upon his passion; let myself and fortune
    Tug for the time to come. This you may know
    And so deliver, I am put to sea
    With her whom here I cannot hold on shore;
    And most opportune to our need I have
    A vessel rides fast by, but not prepared
    For this design. What course I mean to hold
    Shall nothing benefit your knowledge, nor
    Concern me the reporting.

25 IV / 4
  • Hark, Perdita
    [Drawing her aside]
    I'll hear you by and by.
  • Hark, Perdita
    [Drawing her aside]
    I'll hear you by and by.
  • Camillo. O my lord!
    I would your spirit were easier for advice,
    Or stronger for your need.

    Florizel. Hark, Perdita
    [Drawing her aside]
    I'll hear you by and by.

26 IV / 4
  • Now, good Camillo;
    I am so fraught with curious business that
    I leave ou...
  • Now, good Camillo;
    I am so fraught with curious business that
    I leave out ceremony.
  • Camillo. He's irremoveable,
    Resolved for flight. Now were I happy, if
    His going I could frame to serve my turn,
    Save him from danger, do him love and honour,
    Purchase the sight again of dear Sicilia
    And that unhappy king, my master, whom
    I so much thirst to see.

    Florizel. Now, good Camillo;
    I am so fraught with curious business that
    I leave out ceremony.

27 IV / 4
  • Very nobly
    Have you deserved: it is my father's music
    To speak your deed...
  • Very nobly
    Have you deserved: it is my father's music
    To speak your deeds, not little of his care
    To have them recompensed as thought on.
  • Camillo. Sir, I think
    You have heard of my poor services, i' the love
    That I have borne your father?

    Florizel. Very nobly
    Have you deserved: it is my father's music
    To speak your deeds, not little of his care
    To have them recompensed as thought on.

28 IV / 4
  • How, Camillo,
    May this, almost a miracle, be done?
    That I may call thee...
  • How, Camillo,
    May this, almost a miracle, be done?
    That I may call thee something more than man
    And after that trust to thee.
  • Camillo. Well, my lord,
    If you may please to think I love the king
    And through him what is nearest to him, which is
    Your gracious self, embrace but my direction:
    If your more ponderous and settled project
    May suffer alteration, on mine honour,
    I'll point you where you shall have such receiving
    As shall become your highness; where you may
    Enjoy your mistress, from the whom, I see,
    There's no disjunction to be made, but by--
    As heavens forefend!--your ruin; marry her,
    And, with my best endeavours in your absence,
    Your discontenting father strive to qualify
    And bring him up to liking.

    Florizel. How, Camillo,
    May this, almost a miracle, be done?
    That I may call thee something more than man
    And after that trust to thee.

29 IV / 4
  • Not any yet:
    But as the unthought-on accident is guilty
    To what we wildl...
  • Not any yet:
    But as the unthought-on accident is guilty
    To what we wildly do, so we profess
    Ourselves to be the slaves of chance and flies
    Of every wind that blows.
  • Camillo. Have you thought on
    A place whereto you'll go?

    Florizel. Not any yet:
    But as the unthought-on accident is guilty
    To what we wildly do, so we profess
    Ourselves to be the slaves of chance and flies
    Of every wind that blows.

30 IV / 4
  • Worthy Camillo,
    What colour for my visitation shall I
    Hold up before him...
  • Worthy Camillo,
    What colour for my visitation shall I
    Hold up before him?
  • Camillo. Then list to me:
    This follows, if you will not change your purpose
    But undergo this flight, make for Sicilia,
    And there present yourself and your fair princess,
    For so I see she must be, 'fore Leontes:
    She shall be habited as it becomes
    The partner of your bed. Methinks I see
    Leontes opening his free arms and weeping
    His welcomes forth; asks thee the son forgiveness,
    As 'twere i' the father's person; kisses the hands
    Of your fresh princess; o'er and o'er divides him
    'Twixt his unkindness and his kindness; the one
    He chides to hell and bids the other grow
    Faster than thought or time.

    Florizel. Worthy Camillo,
    What colour for my visitation shall I
    Hold up before him?

31 IV / 4
  • I am bound to you:
    There is some sap in this.
  • I am bound to you:
    There is some sap in this.
  • Camillo. Sent by the king your father
    To greet him and to give him comforts. Sir,
    The manner of your bearing towards him, with
    What you as from your father shall deliver,
    Things known betwixt us three, I'll write you down:
    The which shall point you forth at every sitting
    What you must say; that he shall not perceive
    But that you have your father's bosom there
    And speak his very heart.

    Florizel. I am bound to you:
    There is some sap in this.

32 IV / 4
  • My good Camillo,
    She is as forward of her breeding as
    She is i' the rear...
  • My good Camillo,
    She is as forward of her breeding as
    She is i' the rear our birth.
  • Camillo. Yea, say you so?
    There shall not at your father's house these
    seven years
    Be born another such.

    Florizel. My good Camillo,
    She is as forward of her breeding as
    She is i' the rear our birth.

33 IV / 4
  • My prettiest Perdita!
    But O, the thorns we stand upon! Camillo,
    Preserve...
  • My prettiest Perdita!
    But O, the thorns we stand upon! Camillo,
    Preserver of my father, now of me,
    The medicine of our house, how shall we do?
    We are not furnish'd like Bohemia's son,
    Nor shall appear in Sicilia.
  • Perdita. Your pardon, sir; for this
    I'll blush you thanks.

    Florizel. My prettiest Perdita!
    But O, the thorns we stand upon! Camillo,
    Preserver of my father, now of me,
    The medicine of our house, how shall we do?
    We are not furnish'd like Bohemia's son,
    Nor shall appear in Sicilia.

34 IV / 4
  • And those that you'll procure from King Leontes--
  • And those that you'll procure from King Leontes--
  • Camillo. Nay, but my letters, by this means being there
    So soon as you arrive, shall clear that doubt.

    Florizel. And those that you'll procure from King Leontes--

35 IV / 4
  • Dispatch, I prithee.
  • Dispatch, I prithee.
  • Autolycus. Are you in earnest, sir?
    [Aside]
    I smell the trick on't.

    Florizel. Dispatch, I prithee.

36 IV / 4
  • Should I now meet my father,
    He would not call me son.
  • Should I now meet my father,
    He would not call me son.
  • Camillo. No remedy.
    Have you done there?

    Florizel. Should I now meet my father,
    He would not call me son.

37 IV / 4
  • O Perdita, what have we twain forgot!
    Pray you, a word.
  • O Perdita, what have we twain forgot!
    Pray you, a word.
  • Autolycus. Adieu, sir.

    Florizel. O Perdita, what have we twain forgot!
    Pray you, a word.

38 IV / 4
  • Fortune speed us!
    Thus we set on, Camillo, to the sea-side.
  • Fortune speed us!
    Thus we set on, Camillo, to the sea-side.
  • Camillo. [Aside] What I do next, shall be to tell the king
    Of this escape and whither they are bound;
    Wherein my hope is I shall so prevail
    To force him after: in whose company
    I shall review Sicilia, for whose sight
    I have a woman's longing.

    Florizel. Fortune speed us!
    Thus we set on, Camillo, to the sea-side.

39 V / 1
  • By his command
    Have I here touch'd Sicilia and from him
    Give you all gre...
  • By his command
    Have I here touch'd Sicilia and from him
    Give you all greetings that a king, at friend,
    Can send his brother: and, but infirmity
    Which waits upon worn times hath something seized
    His wish'd ability, he had himself
    The lands and waters 'twixt your throne and his
    Measured to look upon you; whom he loves--
    He bade me say so--more than all the sceptres
    And those that bear them living.
  • Leontes. Prithee, no more; cease; thou know'st
    He dies to me again when talk'd of: sure,
    When I shall see this gentleman, thy speeches
    Will bring me to consider that which may
    Unfurnish me of reason. They are come.
    [Re-enter CLEOMENES and others, with FLORIZEL and PERDITA]
    Your mother was most true to wedlock, prince;
    For she did print your royal father off,
    Conceiving you: were I but twenty-one,
    Your father's image is so hit in you,
    His very air, that I should call you brother,
    As I did him, and speak of something wildly
    By us perform'd before. Most dearly welcome!
    And your fair princess,--goddess!--O, alas!
    I lost a couple, that 'twixt heaven and earth
    Might thus have stood begetting wonder as
    You, gracious couple, do: and then I lost--
    All mine own folly--the society,
    Amity too, of your brave father, whom,
    Though bearing misery, I desire my life
    Once more to look on him.

    Florizel. By his command
    Have I here touch'd Sicilia and from him
    Give you all greetings that a king, at friend,
    Can send his brother: and, but infirmity
    Which waits upon worn times hath something seized
    His wish'd ability, he had himself
    The lands and waters 'twixt your throne and his
    Measured to look upon you; whom he loves--
    He bade me say so--more than all the sceptres
    And those that bear them living.

40 V / 1
  • Good my lord,
    She came from Libya.
  • Good my lord,
    She came from Libya.
  • Leontes. O my brother,
    Good gentleman! the wrongs I have done thee stir
    Afresh within me, and these thy offices,
    So rarely kind, are as interpreters
    Of my behind-hand slackness. Welcome hither,
    As is the spring to the earth. And hath he too
    Exposed this paragon to the fearful usage,
    At least ungentle, of the dreadful Neptune,
    To greet a man not worth her pains, much less
    The adventure of her person?

    Florizel. Good my lord,
    She came from Libya.

41 V / 1
  • Most royal sir, from thence; from him, whose daughter
    His tears proclaim'd h...
  • Most royal sir, from thence; from him, whose daughter
    His tears proclaim'd his, parting with her: thence,
    A prosperous south-wind friendly, we have cross'd,
    To execute the charge my father gave me
    For visiting your highness: my best train
    I have from your Sicilian shores dismiss'd;
    Who for Bohemia bend, to signify
    Not only my success in Libya, sir,
    But my arrival and my wife's in safety
    Here where we are.
  • Leontes. Where the warlike Smalus,
    That noble honour'd lord, is fear'd and loved?

    Florizel. Most royal sir, from thence; from him, whose daughter
    His tears proclaim'd his, parting with her: thence,
    A prosperous south-wind friendly, we have cross'd,
    To execute the charge my father gave me
    For visiting your highness: my best train
    I have from your Sicilian shores dismiss'd;
    Who for Bohemia bend, to signify
    Not only my success in Libya, sir,
    But my arrival and my wife's in safety
    Here where we are.

42 V / 1
  • Camillo has betray'd me;
    Whose honour and whose honesty till now
    Endured...
  • Camillo has betray'd me;
    Whose honour and whose honesty till now
    Endured all weathers.
  • Lord. Here in your city; I now came from him:
    I speak amazedly; and it becomes
    My marvel and my message. To your court
    Whiles he was hastening, in the chase, it seems,
    Of this fair couple, meets he on the way
    The father of this seeming lady and
    Her brother, having both their country quitted
    With this young prince.

    Florizel. Camillo has betray'd me;
    Whose honour and whose honesty till now
    Endured all weathers.

43 V / 1
  • We are not, sir, nor are we like to be;
    The stars, I see, will kiss the vall...
  • We are not, sir, nor are we like to be;
    The stars, I see, will kiss the valleys first:
    The odds for high and low's alike.
  • Leontes. You are married?

    Florizel. We are not, sir, nor are we like to be;
    The stars, I see, will kiss the valleys first:
    The odds for high and low's alike.

44 V / 1
  • She is,
    When once she is my wife.
  • She is,
    When once she is my wife.
  • Leontes. My lord,
    Is this the daughter of a king?

    Florizel. She is,
    When once she is my wife.

45 V / 1
  • Dear, look up:
    Though Fortune, visible an enemy,
    Should chase us with my...
  • Dear, look up:
    Though Fortune, visible an enemy,
    Should chase us with my father, power no jot
    Hath she to change our loves. Beseech you, sir,
    Remember since you owed no more to time
    Than I do now: with thought of such affections,
    Step forth mine advocate; at your request
    My father will grant precious things as trifles.
  • Leontes. That 'once' I see by your good father's speed
    Will come on very slowly. I am sorry,
    Most sorry, you have broken from his liking
    Where you were tied in duty, and as sorry
    Your choice is not so rich in worth as beauty,
    That you might well enjoy her.

    Florizel. Dear, look up:
    Though Fortune, visible an enemy,
    Should chase us with my father, power no jot
    Hath she to change our loves. Beseech you, sir,
    Remember since you owed no more to time
    Than I do now: with thought of such affections,
    Step forth mine advocate; at your request
    My father will grant precious things as trifles.

© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.