Speeches (Lines) for Flute in "A Midsummer Night's Dream"

Total: 18
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 2
  • Here, Peter Quince.
  • Here, Peter Quince.
  • Quince. Francis Flute, the bellows-mender.

    Flute. Here, Peter Quince.

2 I / 2
  • What is Thisby? a wandering knight?
  • What is Thisby? a wandering knight?
  • Quince. Flute, you must take Thisby on you.

    Flute. What is Thisby? a wandering knight?

3 I / 2
  • Nay, faith, let me not play a woman; I have a beard coming.
  • Nay, faith, let me not play a woman; I have a beard coming.
  • Quince. It is the lady that Pyramus must love.

    Flute. Nay, faith, let me not play a woman; I have a beard coming.

4 III / 1
  • Must I speak now?
  • Must I speak now?
  • Puck. A stranger Pyramus than e'er played here.

    Flute. Must I speak now?

5 III / 1
  • Most radiant Pyramus, most lily-white of hue,
    Of colour like the red rose on...
  • Most radiant Pyramus, most lily-white of hue,
    Of colour like the red rose on triumphant brier,
    Most brisky juvenal and eke most lovely Jew,
    As true as truest horse that yet would never tire,
    I'll meet thee, Pyramus, at Ninny's tomb.
  • Quince. Ay, marry, must you; for you must understand he goes
    but to see a noise that he heard, and is to come again.

    Flute. Most radiant Pyramus, most lily-white of hue,
    Of colour like the red rose on triumphant brier,
    Most brisky juvenal and eke most lovely Jew,
    As true as truest horse that yet would never tire,
    I'll meet thee, Pyramus, at Ninny's tomb.

6 III / 1
  • O,--As true as truest horse, that yet would
    never tire.
  • O,--As true as truest horse, that yet would
    never tire.
  • Quince. 'Ninus' tomb,' man: why, you must not speak that
    yet; that you answer to Pyramus: you speak all your
    part at once, cues and all Pyramus enter: your cue
    is past; it is, 'never tire.'

    Flute. O,--As true as truest horse, that yet would
    never tire.

7 IV / 2
  • If he come not, then the play is marred: it goes
    not forward, doth it?
  • If he come not, then the play is marred: it goes
    not forward, doth it?
  • Starveling. He cannot be heard of. Out of doubt he is
    transported.

    Flute. If he come not, then the play is marred: it goes
    not forward, doth it?

8 IV / 2
  • No, he hath simply the best wit of any handicraft
    man in Athens.
  • No, he hath simply the best wit of any handicraft
    man in Athens.
  • Quince. It is not possible: you have not a man in all
    Athens able to discharge Pyramus but he.

    Flute. No, he hath simply the best wit of any handicraft
    man in Athens.

9 IV / 2
  • You must say 'paragon:' a paramour is, God bless us,
    a thing of naught.
  • You must say 'paragon:' a paramour is, God bless us,
    a thing of naught.
  • Quince. Yea and the best person too; and he is a very
    paramour for a sweet voice.

    Flute. You must say 'paragon:' a paramour is, God bless us,
    a thing of naught.

10 IV / 2
  • O sweet bully Bottom! Thus hath he lost sixpence a
    day during his life; he c...
  • O sweet bully Bottom! Thus hath he lost sixpence a
    day during his life; he could not have 'scaped
    sixpence a day: an the duke had not given him
    sixpence a day for playing Pyramus, I'll be hanged;
    he would have deserved it: sixpence a day in
    Pyramus, or nothing.
  • Snug. Masters, the duke is coming from the temple, and
    there is two or three lords and ladies more married:
    if our sport had gone forward, we had all been made
    men.

    Flute. O sweet bully Bottom! Thus hath he lost sixpence a
    day during his life; he could not have 'scaped
    sixpence a day: an the duke had not given him
    sixpence a day for playing Pyramus, I'll be hanged;
    he would have deserved it: sixpence a day in
    Pyramus, or nothing.

11 V / 1
  • [as Thisbe] O wall, full often hast thou heard my moans,
    For parting my fair...
  • [as Thisbe] O wall, full often hast thou heard my moans,
    For parting my fair Pyramus and me!
    My cherry lips have often kiss'd thy stones,
    Thy stones with lime and hair knit up in thee.
  • Bottom. No, in truth, sir, he should not. 'Deceiving me'
    is Thisby's cue: she is to enter now, and I am to
    spy her through the wall. You shall see, it will
    fall pat as I told you. Yonder she comes.

    Flute. [as Thisbe] O wall, full often hast thou heard my moans,
    For parting my fair Pyramus and me!
    My cherry lips have often kiss'd thy stones,
    Thy stones with lime and hair knit up in thee.

12 V / 1
  • [as Thisbe] My love thou art, my love I think.
  • [as Thisbe] My love thou art, my love I think.
  • Bottom. I see a voice: now will I to the chink,
    To spy an I can hear my Thisby's face. Thisby!

    Flute. [as Thisbe] My love thou art, my love I think.

13 V / 1
  • [as Thisbe] And I like Helen, till the Fates me kill.
  • [as Thisbe] And I like Helen, till the Fates me kill.
  • Bottom. Think what thou wilt, I am thy lover's grace;
    And, like Limander, am I trusty still.

    Flute. [as Thisbe] And I like Helen, till the Fates me kill.

14 V / 1
  • [as Thisbe] As Shafalus to Procrus, I to you.
  • [as Thisbe] As Shafalus to Procrus, I to you.
  • Bottom. Not Shafalus to Procrus was so true.

    Flute. [as Thisbe] As Shafalus to Procrus, I to you.

15 V / 1
  • [as Thisbe] I kiss the wall's hole, not your lips at all.
  • [as Thisbe] I kiss the wall's hole, not your lips at all.
  • Bottom. O kiss me through the hole of this vile wall!

    Flute. [as Thisbe] I kiss the wall's hole, not your lips at all.

16 V / 1
  • [as Thisbe] 'Tide life, 'tide death, I come without delay.
  • [as Thisbe] 'Tide life, 'tide death, I come without delay.
  • Bottom. Wilt thou at Ninny's tomb meet me straightway?

    Flute. [as Thisbe] 'Tide life, 'tide death, I come without delay.

17 V / 1
  • [as Thisbe] This is old Ninny's tomb. Where is my love?
  • [as Thisbe] This is old Ninny's tomb. Where is my love?
  • Demetrius. Why, all these should be in the lanthorn; for all
    these are in the moon. But, silence! here comes Thisbe.

    Flute. [as Thisbe] This is old Ninny's tomb. Where is my love?

18 V / 1
  • [as Thisbe] Asleep, my love?
    What, dead, my dove?
    O Pyramus, arise!
    ...
  • [as Thisbe] Asleep, my love?
    What, dead, my dove?
    O Pyramus, arise!
    Speak, speak. Quite dumb?
    Dead, dead? A tomb
    Must cover thy sweet eyes.
    These My lips,
    This cherry nose,
    These yellow cowslip cheeks,
    Are gone, are gone:
    Lovers, make moan:
    His eyes were green as leeks.
    O Sisters Three,
    Come, come to me,
    With hands as pale as milk;
    Lay them in gore,
    Since you have shore
    With shears his thread of silk.
    Tongue, not a word:
    Come, trusty sword;
    Come, blade, my breast imbrue:
    [Stabs herself]
    And, farewell, friends;
    Thus Thisby ends:
    Adieu, adieu, adieu.
  • Demetrius. And thus she means, videlicet:--

    Flute. [as Thisbe] Asleep, my love?
    What, dead, my dove?
    O Pyramus, arise!
    Speak, speak. Quite dumb?
    Dead, dead? A tomb
    Must cover thy sweet eyes.
    These My lips,
    This cherry nose,
    These yellow cowslip cheeks,
    Are gone, are gone:
    Lovers, make moan:
    His eyes were green as leeks.
    O Sisters Three,
    Come, come to me,
    With hands as pale as milk;
    Lay them in gore,
    Since you have shore
    With shears his thread of silk.
    Tongue, not a word:
    Come, trusty sword;
    Come, blade, my breast imbrue:
    [Stabs herself]
    And, farewell, friends;
    Thus Thisby ends:
    Adieu, adieu, adieu.

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© Copyright 2017-2021 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.