Speeches (Lines) for King of France in "History of Henry V"

Total: 19
print
# Act / Scene Speech text
1 II / 4
  • Thus comes the English with full power upon us;
    And more than carefully it u...
  • Thus comes the English with full power upon us;
    And more than carefully it us concerns
    To answer royally in our defences.
    Therefore the Dukes of Berri and of Bretagne,
    Of Brabant and of Orleans, shall make forth,
    And you, Prince Dauphin, with all swift dispatch,
    To line and new repair our towns of war
    With men of courage and with means defendant;
    For England his approaches makes as fierce
    As waters to the sucking of a gulf.
    It fits us then to be as provident
    As fear may teach us out of late examples
    Left by the fatal and neglected English
    Upon our fields.
  • Hostess Quickly. Farewell; adieu.

    King of France. Thus comes the English with full power upon us;
    And more than carefully it us concerns
    To answer royally in our defences.
    Therefore the Dukes of Berri and of Bretagne,
    Of Brabant and of Orleans, shall make forth,
    And you, Prince Dauphin, with all swift dispatch,
    To line and new repair our towns of war
    With men of courage and with means defendant;
    For England his approaches makes as fierce
    As waters to the sucking of a gulf.
    It fits us then to be as provident
    As fear may teach us out of late examples
    Left by the fatal and neglected English
    Upon our fields.

2 II / 4
  • Think we King Harry strong;
    And, princes, look you strongly arm to meet him....
  • Think we King Harry strong;
    And, princes, look you strongly arm to meet him.
    The kindred of him hath been flesh'd upon us;
    And he is bred out of that bloody strain
    That haunted us in our familiar paths:
    Witness our too much memorable shame
    When Cressy battle fatally was struck,
    And all our princes captiv'd by the hand
    Of that black name, Edward, Black Prince of Wales;
    Whiles that his mountain sire, on mountain standing,
    Up in the air, crown'd with the golden sun,
    Saw his heroical seed, and smiled to see him,
    Mangle the work of nature and deface
    The patterns that by God and by French fathers
    Had twenty years been made. This is a stem
    Of that victorious stock; and let us fear
    The native mightiness and fate of him.
  • Lewis the Dauphin. Well, 'tis not so, my lord high constable;
    But though we think it so, it is no matter:
    In cases of defence 'tis best to weigh
    The enemy more mighty than he seems:
    So the proportions of defence are fill'd;
    Which of a weak or niggardly projection
    Doth, like a miser, spoil his coat with scanting
    A little cloth.

    King of France. Think we King Harry strong;
    And, princes, look you strongly arm to meet him.
    The kindred of him hath been flesh'd upon us;
    And he is bred out of that bloody strain
    That haunted us in our familiar paths:
    Witness our too much memorable shame
    When Cressy battle fatally was struck,
    And all our princes captiv'd by the hand
    Of that black name, Edward, Black Prince of Wales;
    Whiles that his mountain sire, on mountain standing,
    Up in the air, crown'd with the golden sun,
    Saw his heroical seed, and smiled to see him,
    Mangle the work of nature and deface
    The patterns that by God and by French fathers
    Had twenty years been made. This is a stem
    Of that victorious stock; and let us fear
    The native mightiness and fate of him.

3 II / 4
  • We'll give them present audience. Go, and bring them.
    [Exeunt Messenger and...
  • We'll give them present audience. Go, and bring them.
    [Exeunt Messenger and certain Lords]
    You see this chase is hotly follow'd, friends.
  • Messenger. Ambassadors from Harry King of England
    Do crave admittance to your majesty.

    King of France. We'll give them present audience. Go, and bring them.
    [Exeunt Messenger and certain Lords]
    You see this chase is hotly follow'd, friends.

4 II / 4
  • From our brother England?
  • From our brother England?
  • Lewis the Dauphin. Turn head, and stop pursuit; for coward dogs
    Most spend their mouths when what they seem to threaten
    Runs far before them. Good my sovereign,
    Take up the English short, and let them know
    Of what a monarchy you are the head:
    Self-love, my liege, is not so vile a sin
    As self-neglecting.

    King of France. From our brother England?

5 II / 4
  • Or else what follows?
  • Or else what follows?
  • Duke of Exeter. From him; and thus he greets your majesty.
    He wills you, in the name of God Almighty,
    That you divest yourself, and lay apart
    The borrow'd glories that by gift of heaven,
    By law of nature and of nations, 'long
    To him and to his heirs; namely, the crown
    And all wide-stretched honours that pertain
    By custom and the ordinance of times
    Unto the crown of France. That you may know
    'Tis no sinister nor no awkward claim,
    Pick'd from the worm-holes of long-vanish'd days,
    Nor from the dust of old oblivion raked,
    He sends you this most memorable line,
    In every branch truly demonstrative;
    Willing to overlook this pedigree:
    And when you find him evenly derived
    From his most famed of famous ancestors,
    Edward the Third, he bids you then resign
    Your crown and kingdom, indirectly held
    From him the native and true challenger.

    King of France. Or else what follows?

6 II / 4
  • For us, we will consider of this further:
    To-morrow shall you bear our full...
  • For us, we will consider of this further:
    To-morrow shall you bear our full intent
    Back to our brother England.
  • Duke of Exeter. Bloody constraint; for if you hide the crown
    Even in your hearts, there will he rake for it:
    Therefore in fierce tempest is he coming,
    In thunder and in earthquake, like a Jove,
    That, if requiring fail, he will compel;
    And bids you, in the bowels of the Lord,
    Deliver up the crown, and to take mercy
    On the poor souls for whom this hungry war
    Opens his vasty jaws; and on your head
    Turning the widows' tears, the orphans' cries
    The dead men's blood, the pining maidens groans,
    For husbands, fathers and betrothed lovers,
    That shall be swallow'd in this controversy.
    This is his claim, his threatening and my message;
    Unless the Dauphin be in presence here,
    To whom expressly I bring greeting too.

    King of France. For us, we will consider of this further:
    To-morrow shall you bear our full intent
    Back to our brother England.

7 II / 4
  • To-morrow shall you know our mind at full.
  • To-morrow shall you know our mind at full.
  • Duke of Exeter. He'll make your Paris Louvre shake for it,
    Were it the mistress-court of mighty Europe:
    And, be assured, you'll find a difference,
    As we his subjects have in wonder found,
    Between the promise of his greener days
    And these he masters now: now he weighs time
    Even to the utmost grain: that you shall read
    In your own losses, if he stay in France.

    King of France. To-morrow shall you know our mind at full.

8 II / 4
  • You shall be soon dispatch's with fair conditions:
    A night is but small brea...
  • You shall be soon dispatch's with fair conditions:
    A night is but small breath and little pause
    To answer matters of this consequence.
  • Duke of Exeter. Dispatch us with all speed, lest that our king
    Come here himself to question our delay;
    For he is footed in this land already.

    King of France. You shall be soon dispatch's with fair conditions:
    A night is but small breath and little pause
    To answer matters of this consequence.

9 III / 5
  • 'Tis certain he hath pass'd the river Somme.
  • 'Tis certain he hath pass'd the river Somme.
  • Katharine. C'est assez pour une fois: allons-nous a diner.

    King of France. 'Tis certain he hath pass'd the river Somme.

10 III / 5
  • Where is Montjoy the herald? speed him hence:
    Let him greet England with our...
  • Where is Montjoy the herald? speed him hence:
    Let him greet England with our sharp defiance.
    Up, princes! and, with spirit of honour edged
    More sharper than your swords, hie to the field:
    Charles Delabreth, high constable of France;
    You Dukes of Orleans, Bourbon, and of Berri,
    Alencon, Brabant, Bar, and Burgundy;
    Jaques Chatillon, Rambures, Vaudemont,
    Beaumont, Grandpre, Roussi, and Fauconberg,
    Foix, Lestrale, Bouciqualt, and Charolois;
    High dukes, great princes, barons, lords and knights,
    For your great seats now quit you of great shames.
    Bar Harry England, that sweeps through our land
    With pennons painted in the blood of Harfleur:
    Rush on his host, as doth the melted snow
    Upon the valleys, whose low vassal seat
    The Alps doth spit and void his rheum upon:
    Go down upon him, you have power enough,
    And in a captive chariot into Rouen
    Bring him our prisoner.
  • Duke of Bourbon. They bid us to the English dancing-schools,
    And teach lavoltas high and swift corantos;
    Saying our grace is only in our heels,
    And that we are most lofty runaways.

    King of France. Where is Montjoy the herald? speed him hence:
    Let him greet England with our sharp defiance.
    Up, princes! and, with spirit of honour edged
    More sharper than your swords, hie to the field:
    Charles Delabreth, high constable of France;
    You Dukes of Orleans, Bourbon, and of Berri,
    Alencon, Brabant, Bar, and Burgundy;
    Jaques Chatillon, Rambures, Vaudemont,
    Beaumont, Grandpre, Roussi, and Fauconberg,
    Foix, Lestrale, Bouciqualt, and Charolois;
    High dukes, great princes, barons, lords and knights,
    For your great seats now quit you of great shames.
    Bar Harry England, that sweeps through our land
    With pennons painted in the blood of Harfleur:
    Rush on his host, as doth the melted snow
    Upon the valleys, whose low vassal seat
    The Alps doth spit and void his rheum upon:
    Go down upon him, you have power enough,
    And in a captive chariot into Rouen
    Bring him our prisoner.

11 III / 5
  • Therefore, lord constable, haste on Montjoy.
    And let him say to England that...
  • Therefore, lord constable, haste on Montjoy.
    And let him say to England that we send
    To know what willing ransom he will give.
    Prince Dauphin, you shall stay with us in Rouen.
  • Constable of France. This becomes the great.
    Sorry am I his numbers are so few,
    His soldiers sick and famish'd in their march,
    For I am sure, when he shall see our army,
    He'll drop his heart into the sink of fear
    And for achievement offer us his ransom.

    King of France. Therefore, lord constable, haste on Montjoy.
    And let him say to England that we send
    To know what willing ransom he will give.
    Prince Dauphin, you shall stay with us in Rouen.

12 III / 5
  • Be patient, for you shall remain with us.
    Now forth, lord constable and prin...
  • Be patient, for you shall remain with us.
    Now forth, lord constable and princes all,
    And quickly bring us word of England's fall.
  • Lewis the Dauphin. Not so, I do beseech your majesty.

    King of France. Be patient, for you shall remain with us.
    Now forth, lord constable and princes all,
    And quickly bring us word of England's fall.

13 V / 2
  • Right joyous are we to behold your face,
    Most worthy brother England; fairly...
  • Right joyous are we to behold your face,
    Most worthy brother England; fairly met:
    So are you, princes English, every one.
  • Henry V. Peace to this meeting, wherefore we are met!
    Unto our brother France, and to our sister,
    Health and fair time of day; joy and good wishes
    To our most fair and princely cousin Katharine;
    And, as a branch and member of this royalty,
    By whom this great assembly is contrived,
    We do salute you, Duke of Burgundy;
    And, princes French, and peers, health to you all!

    King of France. Right joyous are we to behold your face,
    Most worthy brother England; fairly met:
    So are you, princes English, every one.

14 V / 2
  • I have but with a cursorary eye
    O'erglanced the articles: pleaseth your grac...
  • I have but with a cursorary eye
    O'erglanced the articles: pleaseth your grace
    To appoint some of your council presently
    To sit with us once more, with better heed
    To re-survey them, we will suddenly
    Pass our accept and peremptory answer.
  • Henry V. Well then the peace,
    Which you before so urged, lies in his answer.

    King of France. I have but with a cursorary eye
    O'erglanced the articles: pleaseth your grace
    To appoint some of your council presently
    To sit with us once more, with better heed
    To re-survey them, we will suddenly
    Pass our accept and peremptory answer.

15 V / 2
  • Yes, my lord, you see them perspectively, the cities
    turned into a maid; for...
  • Yes, my lord, you see them perspectively, the cities
    turned into a maid; for they are all girdled with
    maiden walls that war hath never entered.
  • Henry V. It is so: and you may, some of you, thank love for
    my blindness, who cannot see many a fair French city
    for one fair French maid that stands in my way.

    King of France. Yes, my lord, you see them perspectively, the cities
    turned into a maid; for they are all girdled with
    maiden walls that war hath never entered.

16 V / 2
  • So please you.
  • So please you.
  • Henry V. Shall Kate be my wife?

    King of France. So please you.

17 V / 2
  • We have consented to all terms of reason.
  • We have consented to all terms of reason.
  • Henry V. I am content; so the maiden cities you talk of may
    wait on her: so the maid that stood in the way for
    my wish shall show me the way to my will.

    King of France. We have consented to all terms of reason.

18 V / 2
  • Nor this I have not, brother, so denied,
    But your request shall make me let...
  • Nor this I have not, brother, so denied,
    But your request shall make me let it pass.
  • Duke of Exeter. Only he hath not yet subscribed this:
    Where your majesty demands, that the King of France,
    having any occasion to write for matter of grant,
    shall name your highness in this form and with this
    addition in French, Notre trescher fils Henri, Roi
    d'Angleterre, Heritier de France; and thus in
    Latin, Praeclarissimus filius noster Henricus, Rex
    Angliae, et Haeres Franciae.

    King of France. Nor this I have not, brother, so denied,
    But your request shall make me let it pass.

19 V / 2
  • Take her, fair son, and from her blood raise up
    Issue to me; that the conten...
  • Take her, fair son, and from her blood raise up
    Issue to me; that the contending kingdoms
    Of France and England, whose very shores look pale
    With envy of each other's happiness,
    May cease their hatred, and this dear conjunction
    Plant neighbourhood and Christian-like accord
    In their sweet bosoms, that never war advance
    His bleeding sword 'twixt England and fair France.
  • Henry V. I pray you then, in love and dear alliance,
    Let that one article rank with the rest;
    And thereupon give me your daughter.

    King of France. Take her, fair son, and from her blood raise up
    Issue to me; that the contending kingdoms
    Of France and England, whose very shores look pale
    With envy of each other's happiness,
    May cease their hatred, and this dear conjunction
    Plant neighbourhood and Christian-like accord
    In their sweet bosoms, that never war advance
    His bleeding sword 'twixt England and fair France.

© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.

shakespeare_network

© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.