Speeches (Lines) for Host in "The Merry Wives of Windsor"

Total: 46
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 3
  • What says my bully-rook? speak scholarly and wisely.
  • What says my bully-rook? speak scholarly and wisely.
  • Falstaff. Mine host of the Garter!

    Host. What says my bully-rook? speak scholarly and wisely.

2 I / 3
  • Discard, bully Hercules; cashier: let them wag; trot, trot.
  • Discard, bully Hercules; cashier: let them wag; trot, trot.
  • Falstaff. Truly, mine host, I must turn away some of my
    followers.

    Host. Discard, bully Hercules; cashier: let them wag; trot, trot.

3 I / 3
  • Thou'rt an emperor, Caesar, Keisar, and Pheezar. I
    will entertain Bardolph;...
  • Thou'rt an emperor, Caesar, Keisar, and Pheezar. I
    will entertain Bardolph; he shall draw, he shall
    tap: said I well, bully Hector?
  • Falstaff. I sit at ten pounds a week.

    Host. Thou'rt an emperor, Caesar, Keisar, and Pheezar. I
    will entertain Bardolph; he shall draw, he shall
    tap: said I well, bully Hector?

4 I / 3
  • I have spoke; let him follow.
    [To BARDOLPH]
    Let me see thee froth and li...
  • I have spoke; let him follow.
    [To BARDOLPH]
    Let me see thee froth and lime: I am at a word; follow.
  • Falstaff. Do so, good mine host.

    Host. I have spoke; let him follow.
    [To BARDOLPH]
    Let me see thee froth and lime: I am at a word; follow.

5 II / 1
  • How now, bully-rook! thou'rt a gentleman.
    Cavaleiro-justice, I say!
  • How now, bully-rook! thou'rt a gentleman.
    Cavaleiro-justice, I say!
  • Page. Look where my ranting host of the Garter comes:
    there is either liquor in his pate or money in his
    purse when he looks so merrily.
    [Enter Host]
    How now, mine host!

    Host. How now, bully-rook! thou'rt a gentleman.
    Cavaleiro-justice, I say!

6 II / 1
  • Tell him, cavaleiro-justice; tell him, bully-rook.
  • Tell him, cavaleiro-justice; tell him, bully-rook.
  • Robert Shallow. I follow, mine host, I follow. Good even and
    twenty, good Master Page! Master Page, will you go
    with us? we have sport in hand.

    Host. Tell him, cavaleiro-justice; tell him, bully-rook.

7 II / 1
  • What sayest thou, my bully-rook?
  • What sayest thou, my bully-rook?
  • Ford. Good mine host o' the Garter, a word with you.

    Host. What sayest thou, my bully-rook?

8 II / 1
  • Hast thou no suit against my knight, my
    guest-cavaleire?
  • Hast thou no suit against my knight, my
    guest-cavaleire?
  • Robert Shallow. [To PAGE] Will you go with us to behold it? My
    merry host hath had the measuring of their weapons;
    and, I think, hath appointed them contrary places;
    for, believe me, I hear the parson is no jester.
    Hark, I will tell you what our sport shall be.

    Host. Hast thou no suit against my knight, my
    guest-cavaleire?

9 II / 1
  • My hand, bully; thou shalt have egress and regress;
    --said I well?--and thy...
  • My hand, bully; thou shalt have egress and regress;
    --said I well?--and thy name shall be Brook. It is
    a merry knight. Will you go, An-heires?
  • Ford. None, I protest: but I'll give you a pottle of
    burnt sack to give me recourse to him and tell him
    my name is Brook; only for a jest.

    Host. My hand, bully; thou shalt have egress and regress;
    --said I well?--and thy name shall be Brook. It is
    a merry knight. Will you go, An-heires?

10 II / 1
  • Here, boys, here, here! shall we wag?
  • Here, boys, here, here! shall we wag?
  • Robert Shallow. Tut, sir, I could have told you more. In these times
    you stand on distance, your passes, stoccadoes, and
    I know not what: 'tis the heart, Master Page; 'tis
    here, 'tis here. I have seen the time, with my long
    sword I would have made you four tall fellows skip like rats.

    Host. Here, boys, here, here! shall we wag?

11 II / 3
  • Bless thee, bully doctor!
  • Bless thee, bully doctor!
  • Rugby. Forbear; here's company.

    Host. Bless thee, bully doctor!

12 II / 3
  • To see thee fight, to see thee foin, to see thee
    traverse; to see thee here,...
  • To see thee fight, to see thee foin, to see thee
    traverse; to see thee here, to see thee there; to
    see thee pass thy punto, thy stock, thy reverse, thy
    distance, thy montant. Is he dead, my Ethiopian? is
    he dead, my Francisco? ha, bully! What says my
    AEsculapius? my Galen? my heart of elder? ha! is
    he dead, bully stale? is he dead?
  • Doctor Caius. Vat be all you, one, two, tree, four, come for?

    Host. To see thee fight, to see thee foin, to see thee
    traverse; to see thee here, to see thee there; to
    see thee pass thy punto, thy stock, thy reverse, thy
    distance, thy montant. Is he dead, my Ethiopian? is
    he dead, my Francisco? ha, bully! What says my
    AEsculapius? my Galen? my heart of elder? ha! is
    he dead, bully stale? is he dead?

13 II / 3
  • Thou art a Castalion-King-Urinal. Hector of Greece, my boy!
  • Thou art a Castalion-King-Urinal. Hector of Greece, my boy!
  • Doctor Caius. By gar, he is de coward Jack priest of de vorld; he
    is not show his face.

    Host. Thou art a Castalion-King-Urinal. Hector of Greece, my boy!

14 II / 3
  • Pardon, guest-justice. A word, Mounseur Mockwater.
  • Pardon, guest-justice. A word, Mounseur Mockwater.
  • Robert Shallow. It will be found so, Master Page. Master Doctor
    Caius, I am come to fetch you home. I am sworn of
    the peace: you have showed yourself a wise
    physician, and Sir Hugh hath shown himself a wise
    and patient churchman. You must go with me, master doctor.

    Host. Pardon, guest-justice. A word, Mounseur Mockwater.

15 II / 3
  • Mock-water, in our English tongue, is valour, bully.
  • Mock-water, in our English tongue, is valour, bully.
  • Doctor Caius. Mock-vater! vat is dat?

    Host. Mock-water, in our English tongue, is valour, bully.

16 II / 3
  • He will clapper-claw thee tightly, bully.
  • He will clapper-claw thee tightly, bully.
  • Doctor Caius. By gar, den, I have as mush mock-vater as de
    Englishman. Scurvy jack-dog priest! by gar, me
    vill cut his ears.

    Host. He will clapper-claw thee tightly, bully.

17 II / 3
  • That is, he will make thee amends.
  • That is, he will make thee amends.
  • Doctor Caius. Clapper-de-claw! vat is dat?

    Host. That is, he will make thee amends.

18 II / 3
  • And I will provoke him to't, or let him wag.
  • And I will provoke him to't, or let him wag.
  • Doctor Caius. By gar, me do look he shall clapper-de-claw me;
    for, by gar, me vill have it.

    Host. And I will provoke him to't, or let him wag.

19 II / 3
  • And, moreover, bully,--but first, master guest, and
    Master Page, and eke Cav...
  • And, moreover, bully,--but first, master guest, and
    Master Page, and eke Cavaleiro Slender, go you
    through the town to Frogmore.
  • Doctor Caius. Me tank you for dat.

    Host. And, moreover, bully,--but first, master guest, and
    Master Page, and eke Cavaleiro Slender, go you
    through the town to Frogmore.

20 II / 3
  • He is there: see what humour he is in; and I will
    bring the doctor about by...
  • He is there: see what humour he is in; and I will
    bring the doctor about by the fields. Will it do well?
  • Page. Sir Hugh is there, is he?

    Host. He is there: see what humour he is in; and I will
    bring the doctor about by the fields. Will it do well?

21 II / 3
  • Let him die: sheathe thy impatience, throw cold
    water on thy choler: go abou...
  • Let him die: sheathe thy impatience, throw cold
    water on thy choler: go about the fields with me
    through Frogmore: I will bring thee where Mistress
    Anne Page is, at a farm-house a-feasting; and thou
    shalt woo her. Cried I aim? said I well?
  • Doctor Caius. By gar, me vill kill de priest; for he speak for a
    jack-an-ape to Anne Page.

    Host. Let him die: sheathe thy impatience, throw cold
    water on thy choler: go about the fields with me
    through Frogmore: I will bring thee where Mistress
    Anne Page is, at a farm-house a-feasting; and thou
    shalt woo her. Cried I aim? said I well?

22 II / 3
  • For the which I will be thy adversary toward Anne
    Page. Said I well?
  • For the which I will be thy adversary toward Anne
    Page. Said I well?
  • Doctor Caius. By gar, me dank you for dat: by gar, I love you;
    and I shall procure-a you de good guest, de earl,
    de knight, de lords, de gentlemen, my patients.

    Host. For the which I will be thy adversary toward Anne
    Page. Said I well?

23 II / 3
  • Let us wag, then.
  • Let us wag, then.
  • Doctor Caius. By gar, 'tis good; vell said.

    Host. Let us wag, then.

24 III / 1
  • Disarm them, and let them question: let them keep
    their limbs whole and hack...
  • Disarm them, and let them question: let them keep
    their limbs whole and hack our English.
  • Robert Shallow. So do you, good master doctor.

    Host. Disarm them, and let them question: let them keep
    their limbs whole and hack our English.

25 III / 1
  • Peace, I say, Gallia and Gaul, French and Welsh,
    soul-curer and body-curer!
  • Peace, I say, Gallia and Gaul, French and Welsh,
    soul-curer and body-curer!
  • Sir Hugh Evans. As I am a Christians soul now, look you, this is the
    place appointed: I'll be judgement by mine host of
    the Garter.

    Host. Peace, I say, Gallia and Gaul, French and Welsh,
    soul-curer and body-curer!

26 III / 1
  • Peace, I say! hear mine host of the Garter. Am I
    politic? am I subtle? am I...
  • Peace, I say! hear mine host of the Garter. Am I
    politic? am I subtle? am I a Machiavel? Shall I
    lose my doctor? no; he gives me the potions and the
    motions. Shall I lose my parson, my priest, my Sir
    Hugh? no; he gives me the proverbs and the
    no-verbs. Give me thy hand, terrestrial; so. Give me
    thy hand, celestial; so. Boys of art, I have
    deceived you both; I have directed you to wrong
    places: your hearts are mighty, your skins are
    whole, and let burnt sack be the issue. Come, lay
    their swords to pawn. Follow me, lads of peace;
    follow, follow, follow.
  • Doctor Caius. Ay, dat is very good; excellent.

    Host. Peace, I say! hear mine host of the Garter. Am I
    politic? am I subtle? am I a Machiavel? Shall I
    lose my doctor? no; he gives me the potions and the
    motions. Shall I lose my parson, my priest, my Sir
    Hugh? no; he gives me the proverbs and the
    no-verbs. Give me thy hand, terrestrial; so. Give me
    thy hand, celestial; so. Boys of art, I have
    deceived you both; I have directed you to wrong
    places: your hearts are mighty, your skins are
    whole, and let burnt sack be the issue. Come, lay
    their swords to pawn. Follow me, lads of peace;
    follow, follow, follow.

27 III / 2
  • What say you to young Master Fenton? he capers, he
    dances, he has eyes of yo...
  • What say you to young Master Fenton? he capers, he
    dances, he has eyes of youth, he writes verses, he
    speaks holiday, he smells April and May: he will
    carry't, he will carry't; 'tis in his buttons; he
    will carry't.
  • Doctor Caius. Ay, be-gar; and de maid is love-a me: my nursh-a
    Quickly tell me so mush.

    Host. What say you to young Master Fenton? he capers, he
    dances, he has eyes of youth, he writes verses, he
    speaks holiday, he smells April and May: he will
    carry't, he will carry't; 'tis in his buttons; he
    will carry't.

28 III / 2
  • Farewell, my hearts: I will to my honest knight
    Falstaff, and drink canary w...
  • Farewell, my hearts: I will to my honest knight
    Falstaff, and drink canary with him.
  • Doctor Caius. Go home, John Rugby; I come anon.

    Host. Farewell, my hearts: I will to my honest knight
    Falstaff, and drink canary with him.

29 IV / 3
  • What duke should that be comes so secretly? I hear
    not of him in the court....
  • What duke should that be comes so secretly? I hear
    not of him in the court. Let me speak with the
    gentlemen: they speak English?
  • Bardolph. Sir, the Germans desire to have three of your
    horses: the duke himself will be to-morrow at
    court, and they are going to meet him.

    Host. What duke should that be comes so secretly? I hear
    not of him in the court. Let me speak with the
    gentlemen: they speak English?

30 IV / 3
  • They shall have my horses; but I'll make them pay;
    I'll sauce them: they hav...
  • They shall have my horses; but I'll make them pay;
    I'll sauce them: they have had my house a week at
    command; I have turned away my other guests: they
    must come off; I'll sauce them. Come.
  • Bardolph. Ay, sir; I'll call them to you.

    Host. They shall have my horses; but I'll make them pay;
    I'll sauce them: they have had my house a week at
    command; I have turned away my other guests: they
    must come off; I'll sauce them. Come.

31 IV / 5
  • What wouldst thou have, boor? what: thick-skin?
    speak, breathe, discuss; bri...
  • What wouldst thou have, boor? what: thick-skin?
    speak, breathe, discuss; brief, short, quick, snap.
  • Mistress Page. Go, Mistress Ford,
    Send quickly to Sir John, to know his mind.
    [Exit MISTRESS FORD]
    I'll to the doctor: he hath my good will,
    And none but he, to marry with Nan Page.
    That Slender, though well landed, is an idiot;
    And he my husband best of all affects.
    The doctor is well money'd, and his friends
    Potent at court: he, none but he, shall have her,
    Though twenty thousand worthier come to crave her.

    Host. What wouldst thou have, boor? what: thick-skin?
    speak, breathe, discuss; brief, short, quick, snap.

32 IV / 5
  • There's his chamber, his house, his castle, his
    standing-bed and truckle-bed...
  • There's his chamber, his house, his castle, his
    standing-bed and truckle-bed; 'tis painted about
    with the story of the Prodigal, fresh and new. Go
    knock and call; hell speak like an Anthropophaginian
    unto thee: knock, I say.
  • Simple. Marry, sir, I come to speak with Sir John Falstaff
    from Master Slender.

    Host. There's his chamber, his house, his castle, his
    standing-bed and truckle-bed; 'tis painted about
    with the story of the Prodigal, fresh and new. Go
    knock and call; hell speak like an Anthropophaginian
    unto thee: knock, I say.

33 IV / 5
  • Ha! a fat woman! the knight may be robbed: I'll
    call. Bully knight! bully Si...
  • Ha! a fat woman! the knight may be robbed: I'll
    call. Bully knight! bully Sir John! speak from
    thy lungs military: art thou there? it is thine
    host, thine Ephesian, calls.
  • Simple. There's an old woman, a fat woman, gone up into his
    chamber: I'll be so bold as stay, sir, till she come
    down; I come to speak with her, indeed.

    Host. Ha! a fat woman! the knight may be robbed: I'll
    call. Bully knight! bully Sir John! speak from
    thy lungs military: art thou there? it is thine
    host, thine Ephesian, calls.

34 IV / 5
  • Here's a Bohemian-Tartar tarries the coming down of
    thy fat woman. Let her d...
  • Here's a Bohemian-Tartar tarries the coming down of
    thy fat woman. Let her descend, bully, let her
    descend; my chambers are honourable: fie! privacy?
    fie!
  • Falstaff. [Above] How now, mine host!

    Host. Here's a Bohemian-Tartar tarries the coming down of
    thy fat woman. Let her descend, bully, let her
    descend; my chambers are honourable: fie! privacy?
    fie!

35 IV / 5
  • Ay, come; quick.
  • Ay, come; quick.
  • Falstaff. What are they? let us know.

    Host. Ay, come; quick.

36 IV / 5
  • Conceal them, or thou diest.
  • Conceal them, or thou diest.
  • Simple. I may not conceal them, sir.

    Host. Conceal them, or thou diest.

37 IV / 5
  • Thou art clerkly, thou art clerkly, Sir John. Was
    there a wise woman with th...
  • Thou art clerkly, thou art clerkly, Sir John. Was
    there a wise woman with thee?
  • Simple. I thank your worship: I shall make my master glad
    with these tidings.

    Host. Thou art clerkly, thou art clerkly, Sir John. Was
    there a wise woman with thee?

38 IV / 5
  • Where be my horses? speak well of them, varletto.
  • Where be my horses? speak well of them, varletto.
  • Bardolph. Out, alas, sir! cozenage, mere cozenage!

    Host. Where be my horses? speak well of them, varletto.

39 IV / 5
  • They are gone but to meet the duke, villain: do not
    say they be fled; German...
  • They are gone but to meet the duke, villain: do not
    say they be fled; Germans are honest men.
  • Bardolph. Run away with the cozeners; for so soon as I came
    beyond Eton, they threw me off from behind one of
    them, in a slough of mire; and set spurs and away,
    like three German devils, three Doctor Faustuses.

    Host. They are gone but to meet the duke, villain: do not
    say they be fled; Germans are honest men.

40 IV / 5
  • What is the matter, sir?
  • What is the matter, sir?
  • Sir Hugh Evans. Where is mine host?

    Host. What is the matter, sir?

41 IV / 5
  • Here, master doctor, in perplexity and doubtful dilemma.
  • Here, master doctor, in perplexity and doubtful dilemma.
  • Doctor Caius. Vere is mine host de Jarteer?

    Host. Here, master doctor, in perplexity and doubtful dilemma.

42 IV / 5
  • Hue and cry, villain, go! Assist me, knight. I am
    undone! Fly, run, hue and...
  • Hue and cry, villain, go! Assist me, knight. I am
    undone! Fly, run, hue and cry, villain! I am undone!
  • Doctor Caius. I cannot tell vat is dat: but it is tell-a me dat
    you make grand preparation for a duke de Jamany: by
    my trot, dere is no duke dat the court is know to
    come. I tell you for good vill: adieu.

    Host. Hue and cry, villain, go! Assist me, knight. I am
    undone! Fly, run, hue and cry, villain! I am undone!

43 IV / 6
  • Master Fenton, talk not to me; my mind is heavy: I
    will give over all.
  • Master Fenton, talk not to me; my mind is heavy: I
    will give over all.
  • Falstaff. Come up into my chamber.

    Host. Master Fenton, talk not to me; my mind is heavy: I
    will give over all.

44 IV / 6
  • I will hear you, Master Fenton; and I will at the
    least keep your counsel.
  • I will hear you, Master Fenton; and I will at the
    least keep your counsel.
  • Fenton. Yet hear me speak. Assist me in my purpose,
    And, as I am a gentleman, I'll give thee
    A hundred pound in gold more than your loss.

    Host. I will hear you, Master Fenton; and I will at the
    least keep your counsel.

45 IV / 6
  • Which means she to deceive, father or mother?
  • Which means she to deceive, father or mother?
  • Fenton. From time to time I have acquainted you
    With the dear love I bear to fair Anne Page;
    Who mutually hath answer'd my affection,
    So far forth as herself might be her chooser,
    Even to my wish: I have a letter from her
    Of such contents as you will wonder at;
    The mirth whereof so larded with my matter,
    That neither singly can be manifested,
    Without the show of both; fat Falstaff
    Hath a great scene: the image of the jest
    I'll show you here at large. Hark, good mine host.
    To-night at Herne's oak, just 'twixt twelve and one,
    Must my sweet Nan present the Fairy Queen;
    The purpose why, is here: in which disguise,
    While other jests are something rank on foot,
    Her father hath commanded her to slip
    Away with Slender and with him at Eton
    Immediately to marry: she hath consented: Now, sir,
    Her mother, ever strong against that match
    And firm for Doctor Caius, hath appointed
    That he shall likewise shuffle her away,
    While other sports are tasking of their minds,
    And at the deanery, where a priest attends,
    Straight marry her: to this her mother's plot
    She seemingly obedient likewise hath
    Made promise to the doctor. Now, thus it rests:
    Her father means she shall be all in white,
    And in that habit, when Slender sees his time
    To take her by the hand and bid her go,
    She shall go with him: her mother hath intended,
    The better to denote her to the doctor,
    For they must all be mask'd and vizarded,
    That quaint in green she shall be loose enrobed,
    With ribands pendent, flaring 'bout her head;
    And when the doctor spies his vantage ripe,
    To pinch her by the hand, and, on that token,
    The maid hath given consent to go with him.

    Host. Which means she to deceive, father or mother?

46 IV / 6
  • Well, husband your device; I'll to the vicar:
    Bring you the maid, you shall...
  • Well, husband your device; I'll to the vicar:
    Bring you the maid, you shall not lack a priest.
  • Fenton. Both, my good host, to go along with me:
    And here it rests, that you'll procure the vicar
    To stay for me at church 'twixt twelve and one,
    And, in the lawful name of marrying,
    To give our hearts united ceremony.

    Host. Well, husband your device; I'll to the vicar:
    Bring you the maid, you shall not lack a priest.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.