Speeches (Lines) for Gentleman in "The Tragedy of King Lear"

Total: 41
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 5
  • Ready, my lord.
  • Ready, my lord.
  • Lear. O, let me not be mad, not mad, sweet heaven!
    Keep me in temper; I would not be mad! [Enter a Gentleman.]
    How now? Are the horses ready?

    Gentleman. Ready, my lord.

2 II / 4
  • As I learn'd,
    The night before there was no purpose in them
    Of this remo...
  • As I learn'd,
    The night before there was no purpose in them
    Of this remove.
  • Lear. 'Tis strange that they should so depart from home,
    And not send back my messenger.

    Gentleman. As I learn'd,
    The night before there was no purpose in them
    Of this remove.

3 II / 4
  • Made you no more offence but what you speak of?
  • Made you no more offence but what you speak of?
  • Lear. Follow me not;
    Stay here. Exit.

    Gentleman. Made you no more offence but what you speak of?

4 III / 1
  • One minded like the weather, most unquietly.
  • One minded like the weather, most unquietly.
  • Earl of Kent. Who's there, besides foul weather?

    Gentleman. One minded like the weather, most unquietly.

5 III / 1
  • Contending with the fretful elements;
    Bids the wind blow the earth into the...
  • Contending with the fretful elements;
    Bids the wind blow the earth into the sea,
    Or swell the curled waters 'bove the main,
    That things might change or cease; tears his white hair,
    Which the impetuous blasts, with eyeless rage,
    Catch in their fury and make nothing of;
    Strives in his little world of man to outscorn
    The to-and-fro-conflicting wind and rain.
    This night, wherein the cub-drawn bear would couch,
    The lion and the belly-pinched wolf
    Keep their fur dry, unbonneted he runs,
    And bids what will take all.
  • Earl of Kent. I know you. Where's the King?

    Gentleman. Contending with the fretful elements;
    Bids the wind blow the earth into the sea,
    Or swell the curled waters 'bove the main,
    That things might change or cease; tears his white hair,
    Which the impetuous blasts, with eyeless rage,
    Catch in their fury and make nothing of;
    Strives in his little world of man to outscorn
    The to-and-fro-conflicting wind and rain.
    This night, wherein the cub-drawn bear would couch,
    The lion and the belly-pinched wolf
    Keep their fur dry, unbonneted he runs,
    And bids what will take all.

6 III / 1
  • None but the fool, who labours to outjest
    His heart-struck injuries.
  • None but the fool, who labours to outjest
    His heart-struck injuries.
  • Earl of Kent. But who is with him?

    Gentleman. None but the fool, who labours to outjest
    His heart-struck injuries.

7 III / 1
  • I will talk further with you.
  • I will talk further with you.
  • Earl of Kent. Sir, I do know you,
    And dare upon the warrant of my note
    Commend a dear thing to you. There is division
    (Although as yet the face of it be cover'd
    With mutual cunning) 'twixt Albany and Cornwall;
    Who have (as who have not, that their great stars
    Thron'd and set high?) servants, who seem no less,
    Which are to France the spies and speculations
    Intelligent of our state. What hath been seen,
    Either in snuffs and packings of the Dukes,
    Or the hard rein which both of them have borne
    Against the old kind King, or something deeper,
    Whereof, perchance, these are but furnishings-
    But, true it is, from France there comes a power
    Into this scattered kingdom, who already,
    Wise in our negligence, have secret feet
    In some of our best ports and are at point
    To show their open banner. Now to you:
    If on my credit you dare build so far
    To make your speed to Dover, you shall find
    Some that will thank you, making just report
    Of how unnatural and bemadding sorrow
    The King hath cause to plain.
    I am a gentleman of blood and breeding,
    And from some knowledge and assurance offer
    This office to you.

    Gentleman. I will talk further with you.

8 III / 1
  • Give me your hand. Have you no more to say?
  • Give me your hand. Have you no more to say?
  • Earl of Kent. No, do not.
    For confirmation that I am much more
    Than my out-wall, open this purse and take
    What it contains. If you shall see Cordelia
    (As fear not but you shall), show her this ring,
    And she will tell you who your fellow is
    That yet you do not know. Fie on this storm!
    I will go seek the King.

    Gentleman. Give me your hand. Have you no more to say?

9 IV / 2
  • O, my good lord, the Duke of Cornwall 's dead,
    Slain by his servant, going t...
  • O, my good lord, the Duke of Cornwall 's dead,
    Slain by his servant, going to put out
    The other eye of Gloucester.
  • Duke of Albany. What news?

    Gentleman. O, my good lord, the Duke of Cornwall 's dead,
    Slain by his servant, going to put out
    The other eye of Gloucester.

10 IV / 2
  • A servant that he bred, thrill'd with remorse,
    Oppos'd against the act, bend...
  • A servant that he bred, thrill'd with remorse,
    Oppos'd against the act, bending his sword
    To his great master; who, thereat enrag'd,
    Flew on him, and amongst them fell'd him dead;
    But not without that harmful stroke which since
    Hath pluck'd him after.
  • Duke of Albany. Gloucester's eyes?

    Gentleman. A servant that he bred, thrill'd with remorse,
    Oppos'd against the act, bending his sword
    To his great master; who, thereat enrag'd,
    Flew on him, and amongst them fell'd him dead;
    But not without that harmful stroke which since
    Hath pluck'd him after.

11 IV / 2
  • Both, both, my lord.
    This letter, madam, craves a speedy answer.
    'Tis fr...
  • Both, both, my lord.
    This letter, madam, craves a speedy answer.
    'Tis from your sister.
  • Duke of Albany. This shows you are above,
    You justicers, that these our nether crimes
    So speedily can venge! But O poor Gloucester!
    Lose he his other eye?

    Gentleman. Both, both, my lord.
    This letter, madam, craves a speedy answer.
    'Tis from your sister.

12 IV / 2
  • Come with my lady hither.
  • Come with my lady hither.
  • Duke of Albany. Where was his son when they did take his eyes?

    Gentleman. Come with my lady hither.

13 IV / 2
  • No, my good lord; I met him back again.
  • No, my good lord; I met him back again.
  • Duke of Albany. He is not here.

    Gentleman. No, my good lord; I met him back again.

14 IV / 2
  • Ay, my good lord. 'Twas he inform'd against him,
    And quit the house on purpo...
  • Ay, my good lord. 'Twas he inform'd against him,
    And quit the house on purpose, that their punishment
    Might have the freer course.
  • Duke of Albany. Knows he the wickedness?

    Gentleman. Ay, my good lord. 'Twas he inform'd against him,
    And quit the house on purpose, that their punishment
    Might have the freer course.

15 IV / 3
  • Something he left imperfect in the state, which since his
    coming forth is th...
  • Something he left imperfect in the state, which since his
    coming forth is thought of, which imports to the kingdom so much
    fear and danger that his personal return was most required and
    necessary.
  • Earl of Kent. Why the King of France is so suddenly gone back know you the
    reason?

    Gentleman. Something he left imperfect in the state, which since his
    coming forth is thought of, which imports to the kingdom so much
    fear and danger that his personal return was most required and
    necessary.

16 IV / 3
  • The Marshal of France, Monsieur La Far.
  • The Marshal of France, Monsieur La Far.
  • Earl of Kent. Who hath he left behind him general?

    Gentleman. The Marshal of France, Monsieur La Far.

17 IV / 3
  • Ay, sir. She took them, read them in my presence,
    And now and then an ample...
  • Ay, sir. She took them, read them in my presence,
    And now and then an ample tear trill'd down
    Her delicate cheek. It seem'd she was a queen
    Over her passion, who, most rebel-like,
    Sought to be king o'er her.
  • Earl of Kent. Did your letters pierce the Queen to any demonstration of
    grief?

    Gentleman. Ay, sir. She took them, read them in my presence,
    And now and then an ample tear trill'd down
    Her delicate cheek. It seem'd she was a queen
    Over her passion, who, most rebel-like,
    Sought to be king o'er her.

18 IV / 3
  • Not to a rage. Patience and sorrow strove
    Who should express her goodliest....
  • Not to a rage. Patience and sorrow strove
    Who should express her goodliest. You have seen
    Sunshine and rain at once: her smiles and tears
    Were like, a better way. Those happy smilets
    That play'd on her ripe lip seem'd not to know
    What guests were in her eyes, which parted thence
    As pearls from diamonds dropp'd. In brief,
    Sorrow would be a rarity most belov'd,
    If all could so become it.
  • Earl of Kent. O, then it mov'd her?

    Gentleman. Not to a rage. Patience and sorrow strove
    Who should express her goodliest. You have seen
    Sunshine and rain at once: her smiles and tears
    Were like, a better way. Those happy smilets
    That play'd on her ripe lip seem'd not to know
    What guests were in her eyes, which parted thence
    As pearls from diamonds dropp'd. In brief,
    Sorrow would be a rarity most belov'd,
    If all could so become it.

19 IV / 3
  • Faith, once or twice she heav'd the name of father
    Pantingly forth, as if it...
  • Faith, once or twice she heav'd the name of father
    Pantingly forth, as if it press'd her heart;
    Cried 'Sisters, sisters! Shame of ladies! Sisters!
    Kent! father! sisters! What, i' th' storm? i' th' night?
    Let pity not be believ'd!' There she shook
    The holy water from her heavenly eyes,
    And clamour moisten'd. Then away she started
    To deal with grief alone.
  • Earl of Kent. Made she no verbal question?

    Gentleman. Faith, once or twice she heav'd the name of father
    Pantingly forth, as if it press'd her heart;
    Cried 'Sisters, sisters! Shame of ladies! Sisters!
    Kent! father! sisters! What, i' th' storm? i' th' night?
    Let pity not be believ'd!' There she shook
    The holy water from her heavenly eyes,
    And clamour moisten'd. Then away she started
    To deal with grief alone.

20 IV / 3
  • No.
  • No.
  • Earl of Kent. It is the stars,
    The stars above us, govern our conditions;
    Else one self mate and mate could not beget
    Such different issues. You spoke not with her since?

    Gentleman. No.

21 IV / 3
  • No, since.
  • No, since.
  • Earl of Kent. Was this before the King return'd?

    Gentleman. No, since.

22 IV / 3
  • Why, good sir?
  • Why, good sir?
  • Earl of Kent. Well, sir, the poor distressed Lear's i' th' town;
    Who sometime, in his better tune, remembers
    What we are come about, and by no means
    Will yield to see his daughter.

    Gentleman. Why, good sir?

23 IV / 3
  • Alack, poor gentleman!
  • Alack, poor gentleman!
  • Earl of Kent. A sovereign shame so elbows him; his own unkindness,
    That stripp'd her from his benediction, turn'd her
    To foreign casualties, gave her dear rights
    To his dog-hearted daughters- these things sting
    His mind so venomously that burning shame
    Detains him from Cordelia.

    Gentleman. Alack, poor gentleman!

24 IV / 3
  • 'Tis so; they are afoot.
  • 'Tis so; they are afoot.
  • Earl of Kent. Of Albany's and Cornwall's powers you heard not?

    Gentleman. 'Tis so; they are afoot.

25 IV / 6
  • O, here he is! Lay hand upon him.- Sir,
    Your most dear daughter-
  • O, here he is! Lay hand upon him.- Sir,
    Your most dear daughter-
  • Lear. When we are born, we cry that we are come
    To this great stage of fools. This' a good block.
    It were a delicate stratagem to shoe
    A troop of horse with felt. I'll put't in proof,
    And when I have stol'n upon these sons-in-law,
    Then kill, kill, kill, kill, kill, kill!

    Gentleman. O, here he is! Lay hand upon him.- Sir,
    Your most dear daughter-

26 IV / 6
  • You shall have anything.
  • You shall have anything.
  • Lear. No rescue? What, a prisoner? I am even
    The natural fool of fortune. Use me well;
    You shall have ransom. Let me have a surgeon;
    I am cut to th' brains.

    Gentleman. You shall have anything.

27 IV / 6
  • Good sir-
  • Good sir-
  • Lear. No seconds? All myself?
    Why, this would make a man a man of salt,
    To use his eyes for garden waterpots,
    Ay, and laying autumn's dust.

    Gentleman. Good sir-

28 IV / 6
  • You are a royal one, and we obey you.
  • You are a royal one, and we obey you.
  • Lear. I will die bravely, like a smug bridegroom. What!
    I will be jovial. Come, come, I am a king;
    My masters, know you that?

    Gentleman. You are a royal one, and we obey you.

29 IV / 6
  • A sight most pitiful in the meanest wretch,
    Past speaking of in a king! Thou...
  • A sight most pitiful in the meanest wretch,
    Past speaking of in a king! Thou hast one daughter
    Who redeems nature from the general curse
    Which twain have brought her to.
  • Lear. Then there's life in't. Nay, an you get it, you shall get it
    by running. Sa, sa, sa, sa!

    Gentleman. A sight most pitiful in the meanest wretch,
    Past speaking of in a king! Thou hast one daughter
    Who redeems nature from the general curse
    Which twain have brought her to.

30 IV / 6
  • Sir, speed you. What's your will?
  • Sir, speed you. What's your will?
  • Edgar. Hail, gentle sir.

    Gentleman. Sir, speed you. What's your will?

31 IV / 6
  • Most sure and vulgar. Every one hears that
    Which can distinguish sound.
  • Most sure and vulgar. Every one hears that
    Which can distinguish sound.
  • Edgar. Do you hear aught, sir, of a battle toward?

    Gentleman. Most sure and vulgar. Every one hears that
    Which can distinguish sound.

32 IV / 6
  • Near and on speedy foot. The main descry
    Stands on the hourly thought.
  • Near and on speedy foot. The main descry
    Stands on the hourly thought.
  • Edgar. But, by your favour,
    How near's the other army?

    Gentleman. Near and on speedy foot. The main descry
    Stands on the hourly thought.

33 IV / 6
  • Though that the Queen on special cause is here,
    Her army is mov'd on.
  • Though that the Queen on special cause is here,
    Her army is mov'd on.
  • Edgar. I thank you sir. That's all.

    Gentleman. Though that the Queen on special cause is here,
    Her army is mov'd on.

34 IV / 7
  • Ay, madam. In the heaviness of sleep
    We put fresh garments on him.
  • Ay, madam. In the heaviness of sleep
    We put fresh garments on him.
  • Cordelia. Be govern'd by your knowledge, and proceed
    I' th' sway of your own will. Is he array'd?

    Gentleman. Ay, madam. In the heaviness of sleep
    We put fresh garments on him.

35 IV / 7
  • Holds it true, sir, that the Duke of Cornwall was so slain?
  • Holds it true, sir, that the Duke of Cornwall was so slain?
  • Lear. You must bear with me.
    Pray you now, forget and forgive. I am old and foolish.

    Gentleman. Holds it true, sir, that the Duke of Cornwall was so slain?

36 IV / 7
  • Who is conductor of his people?
  • Who is conductor of his people?
  • Earl of Kent. Most certain, sir.

    Gentleman. Who is conductor of his people?

37 IV / 7
  • They say Edgar, his banish'd son, is with the Earl of Kent
    in Germany.
  • They say Edgar, his banish'd son, is with the Earl of Kent
    in Germany.
  • Earl of Kent. As 'tis said, the bastard son of Gloucester.

    Gentleman. They say Edgar, his banish'd son, is with the Earl of Kent
    in Germany.

38 IV / 7
  • The arbitrement is like to be bloody.
    Fare you well, sir. [Exit...
  • The arbitrement is like to be bloody.
    Fare you well, sir. [Exit.]
  • Earl of Kent. Report is changeable. 'Tis time to look about; the powers of
    the kingdom approach apace.

    Gentleman. The arbitrement is like to be bloody.
    Fare you well, sir. [Exit.]

39 V / 3
  • Help, help! O, help!
  • Help, help! O, help!
  • Edgar. Kent, sir, the banish'd Kent; who in disguise
    Followed his enemy king and did him service
    Improper for a slave.

    Gentleman. Help, help! O, help!

40 V / 3
  • 'Tis hot, it smokes.
    It came even from the heart of- O! she's dead!
  • 'Tis hot, it smokes.
    It came even from the heart of- O! she's dead!
  • Edgar. What means that bloody knife?

    Gentleman. 'Tis hot, it smokes.
    It came even from the heart of- O! she's dead!

41 V / 3
  • Your lady, sir, your lady! and her sister
    By her is poisoned; she hath confe...
  • Your lady, sir, your lady! and her sister
    By her is poisoned; she hath confess'd it.
  • Duke of Albany. Who dead? Speak, man.

    Gentleman. Your lady, sir, your lady! and her sister
    By her is poisoned; she hath confess'd it.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.