Speeches (Lines) for Guildenstern in "The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark"

Total: 29
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# Act, Scene, Line Speech text
1 II, 2, 1114
  • But we both obey,
    And here give up ourselves, in the full bent,
    To lay o...
  • But we both obey,
    And here give up ourselves, in the full bent,
    To lay our service freely at your feet,
    To be commanded.
  • Rosencrantz. Both your Majesties
    Might, by the sovereign power you have of us,
    Put your dread pleasures more into command
    Than to entreaty.

    Guildenstern. But we both obey,
    And here give up ourselves, in the full bent,
    To lay our service freely at your feet,
    To be commanded.

2 II, 2, 1123
  • Heavens make our presence and our practices
    Pleasant and helpful to him!
  • Heavens make our presence and our practices
    Pleasant and helpful to him!
  • Gertrude. Thanks, Guildenstern and gentle Rosencrantz.
    And I beseech you instantly to visit
    My too much changed son.- Go, some of you,
    And bring these gentlemen where Hamlet is.

    Guildenstern. Heavens make our presence and our practices
    Pleasant and helpful to him!

3 II, 2, 1325
  • My honour'd lord!
  • My honour'd lord!
  • (stage directions). Exit [Polonius].

    Guildenstern. My honour'd lord!

4 II, 2, 1330
  • Happy in that we are not over-happy.
    On Fortune's cap we are not the very bu...
  • Happy in that we are not over-happy.
    On Fortune's cap we are not the very button.
  • Rosencrantz. As the indifferent children of the earth.

    Guildenstern. Happy in that we are not over-happy.
    On Fortune's cap we are not the very button.

5 II, 2, 1336
  • Faith, her privates we.
  • Faith, her privates we.
  • Hamlet. Then you live about her waist, or in the middle of her
    favours?

    Guildenstern. Faith, her privates we.

6 II, 2, 1344
  • Prison, my lord?
  • Prison, my lord?
  • Hamlet. Then is doomsday near! But your news is not true. Let me
    question more in particular. What have you, my good friends,
    deserved at the hands of Fortune that she sends you to prison
    hither?

    Guildenstern. Prison, my lord?

7 II, 2, 1356
  • Which dreams indeed are ambition; for the very substance of
    the ambitious is...
  • Which dreams indeed are ambition; for the very substance of
    the ambitious is merely the shadow of a dream.
  • Hamlet. O God, I could be bounded in a nutshell and count myself a
    king of infinite space, were it not that I have bad dreams.

    Guildenstern. Which dreams indeed are ambition; for the very substance of
    the ambitious is merely the shadow of a dream.

8 II, 2, 1374
  • What should we say, my lord?
  • What should we say, my lord?
  • Hamlet. Beggar that I am, I am even poor in thanks; but I thank you;
    and sure, dear friends, my thanks are too dear a halfpenny. Were
    you not sent for? Is it your own inclining? Is it a free
    visitation? Come, deal justly with me. Come, come! Nay, speak.

    Guildenstern. What should we say, my lord?

9 II, 2, 1388
  • My lord, we were sent for.
  • My lord, we were sent for.
  • Hamlet. [aside] Nay then, I have an eye of you.- If you love me, hold
    not off.

    Guildenstern. My lord, we were sent for.

10 II, 2, 1443
  • O, there has been much throwing about of brains.
  • O, there has been much throwing about of brains.
  • Hamlet. Is't possible?

    Guildenstern. O, there has been much throwing about of brains.

11 II, 2, 1452
  • There are the players.
  • There are the players.
  • (stage directions). Flourish for the Players.

    Guildenstern. There are the players.

12 II, 2, 1459
  • In what, my dear lord?
  • In what, my dear lord?
  • Hamlet. Gentlemen, you are welcome to Elsinore. Your hands, come! Th'
    appurtenance of welcome is fashion and ceremony. Let me comply
    with you in this garb, lest my extent to the players (which I
    tell you must show fairly outwards) should more appear like
    entertainment than yours. You are welcome. But my uncle-father
    and aunt-mother are deceiv'd.

    Guildenstern. In what, my dear lord?

13 III, 1, 1689
  • Nor do we find him forward to be sounded,
    But with a crafty madness keeps al...
  • Nor do we find him forward to be sounded,
    But with a crafty madness keeps aloof
    When we would bring him on to some confession
    Of his true state.
  • Rosencrantz. He does confess he feels himself distracted,
    But from what cause he will by no means speak.

    Guildenstern. Nor do we find him forward to be sounded,
    But with a crafty madness keeps aloof
    When we would bring him on to some confession
    Of his true state.

14 III, 1, 1695
  • But with much forcing of his disposition.
  • But with much forcing of his disposition.
  • Rosencrantz. Most like a gentleman.

    Guildenstern. But with much forcing of his disposition.

15 III, 2, 2183
  • Good my lord, vouchsafe me a word with you.
  • Good my lord, vouchsafe me a word with you.
  • Hamlet. Aha! Come, some music! Come, the recorders!
    For if the King like not the comedy,
    Why then, belike he likes it not, perdy.
    Come, some music!
    Enter Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.

    Guildenstern. Good my lord, vouchsafe me a word with you.

16 III, 2, 2185
  • The King, sir-
  • The King, sir-
  • Hamlet. Sir, a whole history.

    Guildenstern. The King, sir-

17 III, 2, 2187
  • Is in his retirement, marvellous distemper'd.
  • Is in his retirement, marvellous distemper'd.
  • Hamlet. Ay, sir, what of him?

    Guildenstern. Is in his retirement, marvellous distemper'd.

18 III, 2, 2189
  • No, my lord; rather with choler.
  • No, my lord; rather with choler.
  • Hamlet. With drink, sir?

    Guildenstern. No, my lord; rather with choler.

19 III, 2, 2193
  • Good my lord, put your discourse into some frame, and start
    not so wildly fr...
  • Good my lord, put your discourse into some frame, and start
    not so wildly from my affair.
  • Hamlet. Your wisdom should show itself more richer to signify this to
    the doctor; for me to put him to his purgation would perhaps
    plunge him into far more choler.

    Guildenstern. Good my lord, put your discourse into some frame, and start
    not so wildly from my affair.

20 III, 2, 2196
  • The Queen, your mother, in most great affliction of spirit
    hath sent me to y...
  • The Queen, your mother, in most great affliction of spirit
    hath sent me to you.
  • Hamlet. I am tame, sir; pronounce.

    Guildenstern. The Queen, your mother, in most great affliction of spirit
    hath sent me to you.

21 III, 2, 2199
  • Nay, good my lord, this courtesy is not of the right breed.
    If it shall plea...
  • Nay, good my lord, this courtesy is not of the right breed.
    If it shall please you to make me a wholesome answer, I will do
    your mother's commandment; if not, your pardon and my return
    shall be the end of my business.
  • Hamlet. You are welcome.

    Guildenstern. Nay, good my lord, this courtesy is not of the right breed.
    If it shall please you to make me a wholesome answer, I will do
    your mother's commandment; if not, your pardon and my return
    shall be the end of my business.

22 III, 2, 2204
  • What, my lord?
  • What, my lord?
  • Hamlet. Sir, I cannot.

    Guildenstern. What, my lord?

23 III, 2, 2230
  • O my lord, if my duty be too bold, my love is too unmannerly.
  • O my lord, if my duty be too bold, my love is too unmannerly.
  • Hamlet. Ay, sir, but 'while the grass grows'- the proverb is something
    musty.
    [Enter the Players with recorders. ]
    O, the recorders! Let me see one. To withdraw with you- why do
    you go about to recover the wind of me, as if you would drive me
    into a toil?

    Guildenstern. O my lord, if my duty be too bold, my love is too unmannerly.

24 III, 2, 2232
  • My lord, I cannot.
  • My lord, I cannot.
  • Hamlet. I do not well understand that. Will you play upon this pipe?

    Guildenstern. My lord, I cannot.

25 III, 2, 2234
  • Believe me, I cannot.
  • Believe me, I cannot.
  • Hamlet. I pray you.

    Guildenstern. Believe me, I cannot.

26 III, 2, 2236
  • I know, no touch of it, my lord.
  • I know, no touch of it, my lord.
  • Hamlet. I do beseech you.

    Guildenstern. I know, no touch of it, my lord.

27 III, 2, 2240
  • But these cannot I command to any utt'rance of harmony. I
    have not the skill...
  • But these cannot I command to any utt'rance of harmony. I
    have not the skill.
  • Hamlet. It is as easy as lying. Govern these ventages with your
    fingers and thumbs, give it breath with your mouth, and it will
    discourse most eloquent music. Look you, these are the stops.

    Guildenstern. But these cannot I command to any utt'rance of harmony. I
    have not the skill.

28 III, 3, 2284
  • We will ourselves provide.
    Most holy and religious fear it is
    To keep th...
  • We will ourselves provide.
    Most holy and religious fear it is
    To keep those many many bodies safe
    That live and feed upon your Majesty.
  • Claudius. I like him not, nor stands it safe with us
    To let his madness range. Therefore prepare you;
    I your commission will forthwith dispatch,
    And he to England shall along with you.
    The terms of our estate may not endure
    Hazard so near us as doth hourly grow
    Out of his lunacies.

    Guildenstern. We will ourselves provide.
    Most holy and religious fear it is
    To keep those many many bodies safe
    That live and feed upon your Majesty.

29 IV, 2, 2704
  • A thing, my lord?
  • A thing, my lord?
  • Hamlet. The body is with the King, but the King is not with the body.
    The King is a thing-

    Guildenstern. A thing, my lord?

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