Speeches (Lines) for Lord Hastings in "History of Henry IV, Part II"

Total: 17
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 3
  • Our present musters grow upon the file
    To five and twenty thousand men of ch...
  • Our present musters grow upon the file
    To five and twenty thousand men of choice;
    And our supplies live largely in the hope
    Of great Northumberland, whose bosom burns
    With an incensed fire of injuries.
  • Lord Mowbray. I well allow the occasion of our amis;
    But gladly would be better satisfied
    How, in our means, we should advance ourselves
    To look with forehead bold and big enough
    Upon the power and puissance of the King.

    Lord Hastings. Our present musters grow upon the file
    To five and twenty thousand men of choice;
    And our supplies live largely in the hope
    Of great Northumberland, whose bosom burns
    With an incensed fire of injuries.

2 I / 3
  • With him, we may.
  • With him, we may.
  • Bardolph. The question then, Lord Hastings, standeth thus:
    Whether our present five and twenty thousand
    May hold up head without Northumberland?

    Lord Hastings. With him, we may.

3 I / 3
  • But, by your leave, it never yet did hurt
    To lay down likelihoods and forms...
  • But, by your leave, it never yet did hurt
    To lay down likelihoods and forms of hope.
  • Bardolph. It was, my lord; who lin'd himself with hope,
    Eating the air and promise of supply,
    Flatt'ring himself in project of a power
    Much smaller than the smallest of his thoughts;
    And so, with great imagination
    Proper to madmen, led his powers to death,
    And, winking, leapt into destruction.

    Lord Hastings. But, by your leave, it never yet did hurt
    To lay down likelihoods and forms of hope.

4 I / 3
  • Grant that our hopes--yet likely of fair birth--
    Should be still-born, and t...
  • Grant that our hopes--yet likely of fair birth--
    Should be still-born, and that we now possess'd
    The utmost man of expectation,
    I think we are so a body strong enough,
    Even as we are, to equal with the King.
  • Bardolph. Yes, if this present quality of war-
    Indeed the instant action, a cause on foot-
    Lives so in hope, as in an early spring
    We see th' appearing buds; which to prove fruit
    Hope gives not so much warrant, as despair
    That frosts will bite them. When we mean to build,
    We first survey the plot, then draw the model;
    And when we see the figure of the house,
    Then we must rate the cost of the erection;
    Which if we find outweighs ability,
    What do we then but draw anew the model
    In fewer offices, or at least desist
    To build at all? Much more, in this great work--
    Which is almost to pluck a kingdom down
    And set another up--should we survey
    The plot of situation and the model,
    Consent upon a sure foundation,
    Question surveyors, know our own estate
    How able such a work to undergo-
    To weigh against his opposite; or else
    We fortify in paper and in figures,
    Using the names of men instead of men;
    Like one that draws the model of a house
    Beyond his power to build it; who, half through,
    Gives o'er and leaves his part-created cost
    A naked subject to the weeping clouds
    And waste for churlish winter's tyranny.

    Lord Hastings. Grant that our hopes--yet likely of fair birth--
    Should be still-born, and that we now possess'd
    The utmost man of expectation,
    I think we are so a body strong enough,
    Even as we are, to equal with the King.

5 I / 3
  • To us no more; nay, not so much, Lord Bardolph;
    For his divisions, as the ti...
  • To us no more; nay, not so much, Lord Bardolph;
    For his divisions, as the times do brawl,
    Are in three heads: one power against the French,
    And one against Glendower; perforce a third
    Must take up us. So is the unfirm King
    In three divided; and his coffers sound
    With hollow poverty and emptiness.
  • Bardolph. What, is the King but five and twenty thousand?

    Lord Hastings. To us no more; nay, not so much, Lord Bardolph;
    For his divisions, as the times do brawl,
    Are in three heads: one power against the French,
    And one against Glendower; perforce a third
    Must take up us. So is the unfirm King
    In three divided; and his coffers sound
    With hollow poverty and emptiness.

6 I / 3
  • If he should do so,
    He leaves his back unarm'd, the French and Welsh
    Bay...
  • If he should do so,
    He leaves his back unarm'd, the French and Welsh
    Baying at his heels. Never fear that.
  • Archbishop Scroop. That he should draw his several strengths together
    And come against us in full puissance
    Need not be dreaded.

    Lord Hastings. If he should do so,
    He leaves his back unarm'd, the French and Welsh
    Baying at his heels. Never fear that.

7 I / 3
  • The Duke of Lancaster and Westmoreland;
    Against the Welsh, himself and Harry...
  • The Duke of Lancaster and Westmoreland;
    Against the Welsh, himself and Harry Monmouth;
    But who is substituted against the French
    I have no certain notice.
  • Bardolph. Who is it like should lead his forces hither?

    Lord Hastings. The Duke of Lancaster and Westmoreland;
    Against the Welsh, himself and Harry Monmouth;
    But who is substituted against the French
    I have no certain notice.

8 I / 3
  • We are time's subjects, and time bids be gone.
  • We are time's subjects, and time bids be gone.
  • Lord Mowbray. Shall we go draw our numbers, and set on?

    Lord Hastings. We are time's subjects, and time bids be gone.

9 IV / 1
  • 'Tis Gaultree Forest, an't shall please your Grace.
  • 'Tis Gaultree Forest, an't shall please your Grace.
  • Archbishop Scroop. What is this forest call'd

    Lord Hastings. 'Tis Gaultree Forest, an't shall please your Grace.

10 IV / 1
  • We have sent forth already.
  • We have sent forth already.
  • Archbishop Scroop. Here stand, my lords, and send discoverers forth
    To know the numbers of our enemies.

    Lord Hastings. We have sent forth already.

11 IV / 1
  • Now, what news?
  • Now, what news?
  • Lord Mowbray. Thus do the hopes we have in him touch ground
    And dash themselves to pieces.

    Lord Hastings. Now, what news?

12 IV / 1
  • Hath the Prince John a full commission,
    In very ample virtue of his father,...
  • Hath the Prince John a full commission,
    In very ample virtue of his father,
    To hear and absolutely to determine
    Of what conditions we shall stand upon?
  • Earl of Westmoreland. That argues but the shame of your offence:
    A rotten case abides no handling.

    Lord Hastings. Hath the Prince John a full commission,
    In very ample virtue of his father,
    To hear and absolutely to determine
    Of what conditions we shall stand upon?

13 IV / 1
  • Fear you not that: if we can make our peace
    Upon such large terms and so abs...
  • Fear you not that: if we can make our peace
    Upon such large terms and so absolute
    As our conditions shall consist upon,
    Our peace shall stand as firm as rocky mountains.
  • Lord Mowbray. There is a thing within my bosom tells me
    That no conditions of our peace can stand.

    Lord Hastings. Fear you not that: if we can make our peace
    Upon such large terms and so absolute
    As our conditions shall consist upon,
    Our peace shall stand as firm as rocky mountains.

14 IV / 1
  • Besides, the King hath wasted all his rods
    On late offenders, that he now do...
  • Besides, the King hath wasted all his rods
    On late offenders, that he now doth lack
    The very instruments of chastisement;
    So that his power, like to a fangless lion,
    May offer, but not hold.
  • Archbishop Scroop. No, no, my lord. Note this: the King is weary
    Of dainty and such picking grievances;
    For he hath found to end one doubt by death
    Revives two greater in the heirs of life;
    And therefore will he wipe his tables clean,
    And keep no tell-tale to his memory
    That may repeat and history his los
    To new remembrance. For full well he knows
    He cannot so precisely weed this land
    As his misdoubts present occasion:
    His foes are so enrooted with his friends
    That, plucking to unfix an enemy,
    He doth unfasten so and shake a friend.
    So that this land, like an offensive wife
    That hath enrag'd him on to offer strokes,
    As he is striking, holds his infant up,
    And hangs resolv'd correction in the arm
    That was uprear'd to execution.

    Lord Hastings. Besides, the King hath wasted all his rods
    On late offenders, that he now doth lack
    The very instruments of chastisement;
    So that his power, like to a fangless lion,
    May offer, but not hold.

15 IV / 2
  • And though we here fall down,
    We have supplies to second our attempt.
    If...
  • And though we here fall down,
    We have supplies to second our attempt.
    If they miscarry, theirs shall second them;
    And so success of mischief shall be born,
    And heir from heir shall hold this quarrel up
    Whiles England shall have generation.
  • Lord Mowbray. If not, we ready are to try our fortunes
    To the last man.

    Lord Hastings. And though we here fall down,
    We have supplies to second our attempt.
    If they miscarry, theirs shall second them;
    And so success of mischief shall be born,
    And heir from heir shall hold this quarrel up
    Whiles England shall have generation.

16 IV / 2
  • Go, Captain, and deliver to the army
    This news of peace. Let them have pay,...
  • Go, Captain, and deliver to the army
    This news of peace. Let them have pay, and part.
    I know it will please them. Hie thee, Captain.
  • Prince John. I give it you, and will maintain my word;
    And thereupon I drink unto your Grace.

    Lord Hastings. Go, Captain, and deliver to the army
    This news of peace. Let them have pay, and part.
    I know it will please them. Hie thee, Captain.

17 IV / 2
  • My lord, our army is dispers'd already.
    Like youthful steers unyok'd, they t...
  • My lord, our army is dispers'd already.
    Like youthful steers unyok'd, they take their courses
    East, west, north, south; or like a school broke up,
    Each hurries toward his home and sporting-place.
  • Prince John. They know their duties.

    Lord Hastings. My lord, our army is dispers'd already.
    Like youthful steers unyok'd, they take their courses
    East, west, north, south; or like a school broke up,
    Each hurries toward his home and sporting-place.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.