Speeches (Lines) for Horatio in "The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark"

Total: 109
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# Act, Scene, Line Speech text
1 I, 1, 18
  • Friends to this ground.
  • Friends to this ground.
  • Francisco. I think I hear them. Stand, ho! Who is there?

    Horatio. Friends to this ground.

2 I, 1, 28
  • A piece of him.
  • A piece of him.
  • Bernardo. Say-
    What, is Horatio there ?

    Horatio. A piece of him.

3 I, 1, 39
  • Tush, tush, 'twill not appear.
  • Tush, tush, 'twill not appear.
  • Marcellus. Horatio says 'tis but our fantasy,
    And will not let belief take hold of him
    Touching this dreaded sight, twice seen of us.
    Therefore I have entreated him along,
    With us to watch the minutes of this night,
    That, if again this apparition come,
    He may approve our eyes and speak to it.

    Horatio. Tush, tush, 'twill not appear.

4 I, 1, 44
  • Well, sit we down,
    And let us hear Bernardo speak of this.
  • Well, sit we down,
    And let us hear Bernardo speak of this.
  • Bernardo. Sit down awhile,
    And let us once again assail your ears,
    That are so fortified against our story,
    What we two nights have seen.

    Horatio. Well, sit we down,
    And let us hear Bernardo speak of this.

5 I, 1, 56
  • Most like. It harrows me with fear and wonder.
  • Most like. It harrows me with fear and wonder.
  • Bernardo. Looks it not like the King? Mark it, Horatio.

    Horatio. Most like. It harrows me with fear and wonder.

6 I, 1, 59
  • What art thou that usurp'st this time of night
    Together with that fair and w...
  • What art thou that usurp'st this time of night
    Together with that fair and warlike form
    In which the majesty of buried Denmark
    Did sometimes march? By heaven I charge thee speak!
  • Marcellus. Question it, Horatio.

    Horatio. What art thou that usurp'st this time of night
    Together with that fair and warlike form
    In which the majesty of buried Denmark
    Did sometimes march? By heaven I charge thee speak!

7 I, 1, 65
  • Stay! Speak, speak! I charge thee speak!
  • Stay! Speak, speak! I charge thee speak!
  • Bernardo. See, it stalks away!

    Horatio. Stay! Speak, speak! I charge thee speak!

8 I, 1, 71
  • Before my God, I might not this believe
    Without the sensible and true avouch...
  • Before my God, I might not this believe
    Without the sensible and true avouch
    Of mine own eyes.
  • Bernardo. How now, Horatio? You tremble and look pale.
    Is not this something more than fantasy?
    What think you on't?

    Horatio. Before my God, I might not this believe
    Without the sensible and true avouch
    Of mine own eyes.

9 I, 1, 75
  • As thou art to thyself.
    Such was the very armour he had on
    When he th' a...
  • As thou art to thyself.
    Such was the very armour he had on
    When he th' ambitious Norway combated.
    So frown'd he once when, in an angry parle,
    He smote the sledded Polacks on the ice.
    'Tis strange.
  • Marcellus. Is it not like the King?

    Horatio. As thou art to thyself.
    Such was the very armour he had on
    When he th' ambitious Norway combated.
    So frown'd he once when, in an angry parle,
    He smote the sledded Polacks on the ice.
    'Tis strange.

10 I, 1, 83
  • In what particular thought to work I know not;
    But, in the gross and scope o...
  • In what particular thought to work I know not;
    But, in the gross and scope of my opinion,
    This bodes some strange eruption to our state.
  • Marcellus. Thus twice before, and jump at this dead hour,
    With martial stalk hath he gone by our watch.

    Horatio. In what particular thought to work I know not;
    But, in the gross and scope of my opinion,
    This bodes some strange eruption to our state.

11 I, 1, 96
  • That can I.
    At least, the whisper goes so. Our last king,
    Whose image ev...
  • That can I.
    At least, the whisper goes so. Our last king,
    Whose image even but now appear'd to us,
    Was, as you know, by Fortinbras of Norway,
    Thereto prick'd on by a most emulate pride,
    Dar'd to the combat; in which our valiant Hamlet
    (For so this side of our known world esteem'd him)
    Did slay this Fortinbras; who, by a seal'd compact,
    Well ratified by law and heraldry,
    Did forfeit, with his life, all those his lands
    Which he stood seiz'd of, to the conqueror;
    Against the which a moiety competent
    Was gaged by our king; which had return'd
    To the inheritance of Fortinbras,
    Had he been vanquisher, as, by the same cov'nant
    And carriage of the article design'd,
    His fell to Hamlet. Now, sir, young Fortinbras,
    Of unimproved mettle hot and full,
    Hath in the skirts of Norway, here and there,
    Shark'd up a list of lawless resolutes,
    For food and diet, to some enterprise
    That hath a stomach in't; which is no other,
    As it doth well appear unto our state,
    But to recover of us, by strong hand
    And terms compulsatory, those foresaid lands
    So by his father lost; and this, I take it,
    Is the main motive of our preparations,
    The source of this our watch, and the chief head
    Of this post-haste and romage in the land.
  • Marcellus. Good now, sit down, and tell me he that knows,
    Why this same strict and most observant watch
    So nightly toils the subject of the land,
    And why such daily cast of brazen cannon
    And foreign mart for implements of war;
    Why such impress of shipwrights, whose sore task
    Does not divide the Sunday from the week.
    What might be toward, that this sweaty haste
    Doth make the night joint-labourer with the day?
    Who is't that can inform me?

    Horatio. That can I.
    At least, the whisper goes so. Our last king,
    Whose image even but now appear'd to us,
    Was, as you know, by Fortinbras of Norway,
    Thereto prick'd on by a most emulate pride,
    Dar'd to the combat; in which our valiant Hamlet
    (For so this side of our known world esteem'd him)
    Did slay this Fortinbras; who, by a seal'd compact,
    Well ratified by law and heraldry,
    Did forfeit, with his life, all those his lands
    Which he stood seiz'd of, to the conqueror;
    Against the which a moiety competent
    Was gaged by our king; which had return'd
    To the inheritance of Fortinbras,
    Had he been vanquisher, as, by the same cov'nant
    And carriage of the article design'd,
    His fell to Hamlet. Now, sir, young Fortinbras,
    Of unimproved mettle hot and full,
    Hath in the skirts of Norway, here and there,
    Shark'd up a list of lawless resolutes,
    For food and diet, to some enterprise
    That hath a stomach in't; which is no other,
    As it doth well appear unto our state,
    But to recover of us, by strong hand
    And terms compulsatory, those foresaid lands
    So by his father lost; and this, I take it,
    Is the main motive of our preparations,
    The source of this our watch, and the chief head
    Of this post-haste and romage in the land.

12 I, 1, 129
  • A mote it is to trouble the mind's eye.
    In the most high and palmy state of...
  • A mote it is to trouble the mind's eye.
    In the most high and palmy state of Rome,
    A little ere the mightiest Julius fell,
    The graves stood tenantless, and the sheeted dead
    Did squeak and gibber in the Roman streets;
    As stars with trains of fire, and dews of blood,
    Disasters in the sun; and the moist star
    Upon whose influence Neptune's empire stands
    Was sick almost to doomsday with eclipse.
    And even the like precurse of fierce events,
    As harbingers preceding still the fates
    And prologue to the omen coming on,
    Have heaven and earth together demonstrated
    Unto our climature and countrymen.
    [Enter Ghost again.]
    But soft! behold! Lo, where it comes again!
    I'll cross it, though it blast me.- Stay illusion!
    [Spreads his arms.]
    If thou hast any sound, or use of voice,
    Speak to me.
    If there be any good thing to be done,
    That may to thee do ease, and, grace to me,
    Speak to me.
    If thou art privy to thy country's fate,
    Which happily foreknowing may avoid,
    O, speak!
    Or if thou hast uphoarded in thy life
    Extorted treasure in the womb of earth
    (For which, they say, you spirits oft walk in death),
    [The cock crows.]
    Speak of it! Stay, and speak!- Stop it, Marcellus!
  • Bernardo. I think it be no other but e'en so.
    Well may it sort that this portentous figure
    Comes armed through our watch, so like the King
    That was and is the question of these wars.

    Horatio. A mote it is to trouble the mind's eye.
    In the most high and palmy state of Rome,
    A little ere the mightiest Julius fell,
    The graves stood tenantless, and the sheeted dead
    Did squeak and gibber in the Roman streets;
    As stars with trains of fire, and dews of blood,
    Disasters in the sun; and the moist star
    Upon whose influence Neptune's empire stands
    Was sick almost to doomsday with eclipse.
    And even the like precurse of fierce events,
    As harbingers preceding still the fates
    And prologue to the omen coming on,
    Have heaven and earth together demonstrated
    Unto our climature and countrymen.
    [Enter Ghost again.]
    But soft! behold! Lo, where it comes again!
    I'll cross it, though it blast me.- Stay illusion!
    [Spreads his arms.]
    If thou hast any sound, or use of voice,
    Speak to me.
    If there be any good thing to be done,
    That may to thee do ease, and, grace to me,
    Speak to me.
    If thou art privy to thy country's fate,
    Which happily foreknowing may avoid,
    O, speak!
    Or if thou hast uphoarded in thy life
    Extorted treasure in the womb of earth
    (For which, they say, you spirits oft walk in death),
    [The cock crows.]
    Speak of it! Stay, and speak!- Stop it, Marcellus!

13 I, 1, 161
  • Do, if it will not stand.
  • Do, if it will not stand.
  • Marcellus. Shall I strike at it with my partisan?

    Horatio. Do, if it will not stand.

14 I, 1, 163
  • 'Tis here!
  • 'Tis here!
  • Bernardo. 'Tis here!

    Horatio. 'Tis here!

15 I, 1, 171
  • And then it started, like a guilty thing
    Upon a fearful summons. I have hea...
  • And then it started, like a guilty thing
    Upon a fearful summons. I have heard
    The cock, that is the trumpet to the morn,
    Doth with his lofty and shrill-sounding throat
    Awake the god of day; and at his warning,
    Whether in sea or fire, in earth or air,
    Th' extravagant and erring spirit hies
    To his confine; and of the truth herein
    This present object made probation.
  • Bernardo. It was about to speak, when the cock crew.

    Horatio. And then it started, like a guilty thing
    Upon a fearful summons. I have heard
    The cock, that is the trumpet to the morn,
    Doth with his lofty and shrill-sounding throat
    Awake the god of day; and at his warning,
    Whether in sea or fire, in earth or air,
    Th' extravagant and erring spirit hies
    To his confine; and of the truth herein
    This present object made probation.

16 I, 1, 188
  • So have I heard and do in part believe it.
    But look, the morn, in russet man...
  • So have I heard and do in part believe it.
    But look, the morn, in russet mantle clad,
    Walks o'er the dew of yon high eastward hill.
    Break we our watch up; and by my advice
    Let us impart what we have seen to-night
    Unto young Hamlet; for, upon my life,
    This spirit, dumb to us, will speak to him.
    Do you consent we shall acquaint him with it,
    As needful in our loves, fitting our duty?
    Let's do't, I pray; and I this morning know
    Where we shall find him most conveniently.
  • Marcellus. It faded on the crowing of the cock.
    Some say that ever, 'gainst that season comes
    Wherein our Saviour's birth is celebrated,
    The bird of dawning singeth all night long;
    And then, they say, no spirit dare stir abroad,
    The nights are wholesome, then no planets strike,
    No fairy takes, nor witch hath power to charm,
    So hallow'd and so gracious is the time.

    Horatio. So have I heard and do in part believe it.
    But look, the morn, in russet mantle clad,
    Walks o'er the dew of yon high eastward hill.
    Break we our watch up; and by my advice
    Let us impart what we have seen to-night
    Unto young Hamlet; for, upon my life,
    This spirit, dumb to us, will speak to him.
    Do you consent we shall acquaint him with it,
    As needful in our loves, fitting our duty?
    Let's do't, I pray; and I this morning know
    Where we shall find him most conveniently.

17 I, 2, 365
  • Hail to your lordship!
  • Hail to your lordship!
  • (stage directions). Enter Horatio, Marcellus, and Bernardo.

    Horatio. Hail to your lordship!

18 I, 2, 368
  • The same, my lord, and your poor servant ever.
  • The same, my lord, and your poor servant ever.
  • Hamlet. I am glad to see you well.
    Horatio!- or I do forget myself.

    Horatio. The same, my lord, and your poor servant ever.

19 I, 2, 375
  • A truant disposition, good my lord.
  • A truant disposition, good my lord.
  • Hamlet. I am very glad to see you.- [To Bernardo] Good even, sir.-
    But what, in faith, make you from Wittenberg?

    Horatio. A truant disposition, good my lord.

20 I, 2, 382
  • My lord, I came to see your father's funeral.
  • My lord, I came to see your father's funeral.
  • Hamlet. I would not hear your enemy say so,
    Nor shall you do my ear that violence
    To make it truster of your own report
    Against yourself. I know you are no truant.
    But what is your affair in Elsinore?
    We'll teach you to drink deep ere you depart.

    Horatio. My lord, I came to see your father's funeral.

21 I, 2, 385
  • Indeed, my lord, it followed hard upon.
  • Indeed, my lord, it followed hard upon.
  • Hamlet. I prithee do not mock me, fellow student.
    I think it was to see my mother's wedding.

    Horatio. Indeed, my lord, it followed hard upon.

22 I, 2, 391
  • O, where, my lord?
  • O, where, my lord?
  • Hamlet. Thrift, thrift, Horatio! The funeral bak'd meats
    Did coldly furnish forth the marriage tables.
    Would I had met my dearest foe in heaven
    Or ever I had seen that day, Horatio!
    My father- methinks I see my father.

    Horatio. O, where, my lord?

23 I, 2, 393
  • I saw him once. He was a goodly king.
  • I saw him once. He was a goodly king.
  • Hamlet. In my mind's eye, Horatio.

    Horatio. I saw him once. He was a goodly king.

24 I, 2, 396
  • My lord, I think I saw him yesternight.
  • My lord, I think I saw him yesternight.
  • Hamlet. He was a man, take him for all in all.
    I shall not look upon his like again.

    Horatio. My lord, I think I saw him yesternight.

25 I, 2, 398
  • My lord, the King your father.
  • My lord, the King your father.
  • Hamlet. Saw? who?

    Horatio. My lord, the King your father.

26 I, 2, 400
  • Season your admiration for a while
    With an attent ear, till I may deliver
  • Season your admiration for a while
    With an attent ear, till I may deliver
    Upon the witness of these gentlemen,
    This marvel to you.
  • Hamlet. The King my father?

    Horatio. Season your admiration for a while
    With an attent ear, till I may deliver
    Upon the witness of these gentlemen,
    This marvel to you.

27 I, 2, 405
  • Two nights together had these gentlemen
    (Marcellus and Bernardo) on their wa...
  • Two nights together had these gentlemen
    (Marcellus and Bernardo) on their watch
    In the dead vast and middle of the night
    Been thus encount'red. A figure like your father,
    Armed at point exactly, cap-a-pe,
    Appears before them and with solemn march
    Goes slow and stately by them. Thrice he walk'd
    By their oppress'd and fear-surprised eyes,
    Within his truncheon's length; whilst they distill'd
    Almost to jelly with the act of fear,
    Stand dumb and speak not to him. This to me
    In dreadful secrecy impart they did,
    And I with them the third night kept the watch;
    Where, as they had deliver'd, both in time,
    Form of the thing, each word made true and good,
    The apparition comes. I knew your father.
    These hands are not more like.
  • Hamlet. For God's love let me hear!

    Horatio. Two nights together had these gentlemen
    (Marcellus and Bernardo) on their watch
    In the dead vast and middle of the night
    Been thus encount'red. A figure like your father,
    Armed at point exactly, cap-a-pe,
    Appears before them and with solemn march
    Goes slow and stately by them. Thrice he walk'd
    By their oppress'd and fear-surprised eyes,
    Within his truncheon's length; whilst they distill'd
    Almost to jelly with the act of fear,
    Stand dumb and speak not to him. This to me
    In dreadful secrecy impart they did,
    And I with them the third night kept the watch;
    Where, as they had deliver'd, both in time,
    Form of the thing, each word made true and good,
    The apparition comes. I knew your father.
    These hands are not more like.

28 I, 2, 425
  • My lord, I did;
    But answer made it none. Yet once methought
    It lifted up...
  • My lord, I did;
    But answer made it none. Yet once methought
    It lifted up it head and did address
    Itself to motion, like as it would speak;
    But even then the morning cock crew loud,
    And at the sound it shrunk in haste away
    And vanish'd from our sight.
  • Hamlet. Did you not speak to it?

    Horatio. My lord, I did;
    But answer made it none. Yet once methought
    It lifted up it head and did address
    Itself to motion, like as it would speak;
    But even then the morning cock crew loud,
    And at the sound it shrunk in haste away
    And vanish'd from our sight.

29 I, 2, 433
  • As I do live, my honour'd lord, 'tis true;
    And we did think it writ down in...
  • As I do live, my honour'd lord, 'tis true;
    And we did think it writ down in our duty
    To let you know of it.
  • Hamlet. 'Tis very strange.

    Horatio. As I do live, my honour'd lord, 'tis true;
    And we did think it writ down in our duty
    To let you know of it.

30 I, 2, 444
  • O, yes, my lord! He wore his beaver up.
  • O, yes, my lord! He wore his beaver up.
  • Hamlet. Then saw you not his face?

    Horatio. O, yes, my lord! He wore his beaver up.

31 I, 2, 446
  • A countenance more in sorrow than in anger.
  • A countenance more in sorrow than in anger.
  • Hamlet. What, look'd he frowningly.

    Horatio. A countenance more in sorrow than in anger.

32 I, 2, 448
  • Nay, very pale.
  • Nay, very pale.
  • Hamlet. Pale or red?

    Horatio. Nay, very pale.

33 I, 2, 450
  • Most constantly.
  • Most constantly.
  • Hamlet. And fix'd his eyes upon you?

    Horatio. Most constantly.

34 I, 2, 452
  • It would have much amaz'd you.
  • It would have much amaz'd you.
  • Hamlet. I would I had been there.

    Horatio. It would have much amaz'd you.

35 I, 2, 454
  • While one with moderate haste might tell a hundred.
  • While one with moderate haste might tell a hundred.
  • Hamlet. Very like, very like. Stay'd it long?

    Horatio. While one with moderate haste might tell a hundred.

36 I, 2, 456
  • Not when I saw't.
  • Not when I saw't.
  • Marcellus. [with Bernardo] Longer, longer.

    Horatio. Not when I saw't.

37 I, 2, 458
  • It was, as I have seen it in his life,
    A sable silver'd.
  • It was, as I have seen it in his life,
    A sable silver'd.
  • Hamlet. His beard was grizzled- no?

    Horatio. It was, as I have seen it in his life,
    A sable silver'd.

38 I, 2, 462
  • I warr'nt it will.
  • I warr'nt it will.
  • Hamlet. I will watch to-night.
    Perchance 'twill walk again.

    Horatio. I warr'nt it will.

39 I, 4, 627
  • It is a nipping and an eager air.
  • It is a nipping and an eager air.
  • Hamlet. The air bites shrewdly; it is very cold.

    Horatio. It is a nipping and an eager air.

40 I, 4, 629
  • I think it lacks of twelve.
  • I think it lacks of twelve.
  • Hamlet. What hour now?

    Horatio. I think it lacks of twelve.

41 I, 4, 631
  • Indeed? I heard it not. It then draws near the season
    Wherein the spirit hel...
  • Indeed? I heard it not. It then draws near the season
    Wherein the spirit held his wont to walk.
    [A flourish of trumpets, and two pieces go off.]
    What does this mean, my lord?
  • Marcellus. No, it is struck.

    Horatio. Indeed? I heard it not. It then draws near the season
    Wherein the spirit held his wont to walk.
    [A flourish of trumpets, and two pieces go off.]
    What does this mean, my lord?

42 I, 4, 640
  • Is it a custom?
  • Is it a custom?
  • Hamlet. The King doth wake to-night and takes his rouse,
    Keeps wassail, and the swagg'ring upspring reels,
    And, as he drains his draughts of Rhenish down,
    The kettledrum and trumpet thus bray out
    The triumph of his pledge.

    Horatio. Is it a custom?

43 I, 4, 667
  • Look, my lord, it comes!
  • Look, my lord, it comes!
  • (stage directions). Enter Ghost.

    Horatio. Look, my lord, it comes!

44 I, 4, 688
  • It beckons you to go away with it,
    As if it some impartment did desire
    T...
  • It beckons you to go away with it,
    As if it some impartment did desire
    To you alone.
  • (stage directions). Ghost beckons Hamlet.

    Horatio. It beckons you to go away with it,
    As if it some impartment did desire
    To you alone.

45 I, 4, 694
  • No, by no means!
  • No, by no means!
  • Marcellus. Look with what courteous action
    It waves you to a more removed ground.
    But do not go with it!

    Horatio. No, by no means!

46 I, 4, 696
  • Do not, my lord!
  • Do not, my lord!
  • Hamlet. It will not speak. Then will I follow it.

    Horatio. Do not, my lord!

47 I, 4, 702
  • What if it tempt you toward the flood, my lord,
    Or to the dreadful summit of...
  • What if it tempt you toward the flood, my lord,
    Or to the dreadful summit of the cliff
    That beetles o'er his base into the sea,
    And there assume some other, horrible form
    Which might deprive your sovereignty of reason
    And draw you into madness? Think of it.
    The very place puts toys of desperation,
    Without more motive, into every brain
    That looks so many fadoms to the sea
    And hears it roar beneath.
  • Hamlet. Why, what should be the fear?
    I do not set my life at a pin's fee;
    And for my soul, what can it do to that,
    Being a thing immortal as itself?
    It waves me forth again. I'll follow it.

    Horatio. What if it tempt you toward the flood, my lord,
    Or to the dreadful summit of the cliff
    That beetles o'er his base into the sea,
    And there assume some other, horrible form
    Which might deprive your sovereignty of reason
    And draw you into madness? Think of it.
    The very place puts toys of desperation,
    Without more motive, into every brain
    That looks so many fadoms to the sea
    And hears it roar beneath.

48 I, 4, 716
  • Be rul'd. You shall not go.
  • Be rul'd. You shall not go.
  • Hamlet. Hold off your hands!

    Horatio. Be rul'd. You shall not go.

49 I, 4, 725
  • He waxes desperate with imagination.
  • He waxes desperate with imagination.
  • (stage directions). Exeunt Ghost and Hamlet.

    Horatio. He waxes desperate with imagination.

50 I, 4, 727
  • Have after. To what issue will this come?
  • Have after. To what issue will this come?
  • Marcellus. Let's follow. 'Tis not fit thus to obey him.

    Horatio. Have after. To what issue will this come?

51 I, 4, 729
  • Heaven will direct it.
  • Heaven will direct it.
  • Marcellus. Something is rotten in the state of Denmark.

    Horatio. Heaven will direct it.

52 I, 5, 851
  • [within] My lord, my lord!
  • [within] My lord, my lord!
  • Hamlet. O all you host of heaven! O earth! What else?
    And shall I couple hell? Hold, hold, my heart!
    And you, my sinews, grow not instant old,
    But bear me stiffly up. Remember thee?
    Ay, thou poor ghost, while memory holds a seat
    In this distracted globe. Remember thee?
    Yea, from the table of my memory
    I'll wipe away all trivial fond records,
    All saws of books, all forms, all pressures past
    That youth and observation copied there,
    And thy commandment all alone shall live
    Within the book and volume of my brain,
    Unmix'd with baser matter. Yes, by heaven!
    O most pernicious woman!
    O villain, villain, smiling, damned villain!
    My tables! Meet it is I set it down
    That one may smile, and smile, and be a villain;
    At least I am sure it may be so in Denmark. [Writes.]
    So, uncle, there you are. Now to my word:
    It is 'Adieu, adieu! Remember me.'
    I have sworn't.

    Horatio. [within] My lord, my lord!

53 I, 5, 854
  • Heaven secure him!
  • Heaven secure him!
  • Marcellus. Lord Hamlet!

    Horatio. Heaven secure him!

54 I, 5, 859
  • What news, my lord?
  • What news, my lord?
  • Marcellus. How is't, my noble lord?

    Horatio. What news, my lord?

55 I, 5, 861
  • Good my lord, tell it.
  • Good my lord, tell it.
  • Marcellus. O, wonderful!

    Horatio. Good my lord, tell it.

56 I, 5, 863
  • Not I, my lord, by heaven!
  • Not I, my lord, by heaven!
  • Hamlet. No, you will reveal it.

    Horatio. Not I, my lord, by heaven!

57 I, 5, 870
  • There needs no ghost, my lord, come from the grave
    To tell us this.
  • There needs no ghost, my lord, come from the grave
    To tell us this.
  • Hamlet. There's neer a villain dwelling in all Denmark
    But he's an arrant knave.

    Horatio. There needs no ghost, my lord, come from the grave
    To tell us this.

58 I, 5, 879
  • These are but wild and whirling words, my lord.
  • These are but wild and whirling words, my lord.
  • Hamlet. Why, right! You are in the right!
    And so, without more circumstance at all,
    I hold it fit that we shake hands and part;
    You, as your business and desires shall point you,
    For every man hath business and desire,
    Such as it is; and for my own poor part,
    Look you, I'll go pray.

    Horatio. These are but wild and whirling words, my lord.

59 I, 5, 882
  • There's no offence, my lord.
  • There's no offence, my lord.
  • Hamlet. I am sorry they offend you, heartily;
    Yes, faith, heartily.

    Horatio. There's no offence, my lord.

60 I, 5, 890
  • What is't, my lord? We will.
  • What is't, my lord? We will.
  • Hamlet. Yes, by Saint Patrick, but there is, Horatio,
    And much offence too. Touching this vision here,
    It is an honest ghost, that let me tell you.
    For your desire to know what is between us,
    O'ermaster't as you may. And now, good friends,
    As you are friends, scholars, and soldiers,
    Give me one poor request.

    Horatio. What is't, my lord? We will.

61 I, 5, 894
  • In faith,
    My lord, not I.
  • In faith,
    My lord, not I.
  • Hamlet. Nay, but swear't.

    Horatio. In faith,
    My lord, not I.

62 I, 5, 905
  • Propose the oath, my lord.
  • Propose the oath, my lord.
  • Hamlet. Aha boy, say'st thou so? Art thou there, truepenny?
    Come on! You hear this fellow in the cellarage.
    Consent to swear.

    Horatio. Propose the oath, my lord.

63 I, 5, 917
  • O day and night, but this is wondrous strange!
  • O day and night, but this is wondrous strange!
  • Hamlet. Well said, old mole! Canst work i' th' earth so fast?
    A worthy pioner! Once more remove, good friends."

    Horatio. O day and night, but this is wondrous strange!

64 III, 2, 1931
  • Here, sweet lord, at your service.
  • Here, sweet lord, at your service.
  • (stage directions). Enter Horatio.

    Horatio. Here, sweet lord, at your service.

65 III, 2, 1934
  • O, my dear lord!
  • O, my dear lord!
  • Hamlet. Horatio, thou art e'en as just a man
    As e'er my conversation cop'd withal.

    Horatio. O, my dear lord!

66 III, 2, 1967
  • Well, my lord.
    If he steal aught the whilst this play is playing,
    And sc...
  • Well, my lord.
    If he steal aught the whilst this play is playing,
    And scape detecting, I will pay the theft.
    Sound a flourish. [Enter Trumpets and Kettledrums. Danish
    march. [Enter King, Queen, Polonius, Ophelia, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern,
    and other Lords attendant, with the Guard carrying torches.]
  • Hamlet. Nay, do not think I flatter;
    For what advancement may I hope from thee,
    That no revenue hast but thy good spirits
    To feed and clothe thee? Why should the poor be flatter'd?
    No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp,
    And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee
    Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear?
    Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice
    And could of men distinguish, her election
    Hath seal'd thee for herself. For thou hast been
    As one, in suff'ring all, that suffers nothing;
    A man that Fortune's buffets and rewards
    Hast ta'en with equal thanks; and blest are those
    Whose blood and judgment are so well commingled
    That they are not a pipe for Fortune's finger
    To sound what stop she please. Give me that man
    That is not passion's slave, and I will wear him
    In my heart's core, ay, in my heart of heart,
    As I do thee. Something too much of this I
    There is a play to-night before the King.
    One scene of it comes near the circumstance,
    Which I have told thee, of my father's death.
    I prithee, when thou seest that act afoot,
    Even with the very comment of thy soul
    Observe my uncle. If his occulted guilt
    Do not itself unkennel in one speech,
    It is a damned ghost that we have seen,
    And my imaginations are as foul
    As Vulcan's stithy. Give him heedful note;
    For I mine eyes will rivet to his face,
    And after we will both our judgments join
    In censure of his seeming.

    Horatio. Well, my lord.
    If he steal aught the whilst this play is playing,
    And scape detecting, I will pay the theft.
    Sound a flourish. [Enter Trumpets and Kettledrums. Danish
    march. [Enter King, Queen, Polonius, Ophelia, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern,
    and other Lords attendant, with the Guard carrying torches.]

67 III, 2, 2166
  • Half a share.
  • Half a share.
  • Hamlet. Why, let the strucken deer go weep,
    The hart ungalled play;
    For some must watch, while some must sleep:
    Thus runs the world away.
    Would not this, sir, and a forest of feathers- if the rest of my
    fortunes turn Turk with me-with two Provincial roses on my raz'd
    shoes, get me a fellowship in a cry of players, sir?

    Horatio. Half a share.

68 III, 2, 2172
  • You might have rhym'd.
  • You might have rhym'd.
  • Hamlet. A whole one I!
    For thou dost know, O Damon dear,
    This realm dismantled was
    Of Jove himself; and now reigns here
    A very, very- pajock.

    Horatio. You might have rhym'd.

69 III, 2, 2175
  • Very well, my lord.
  • Very well, my lord.
  • Hamlet. O good Horatio, I'll take the ghost's word for a thousand
    pound! Didst perceive?

    Horatio. Very well, my lord.

70 III, 2, 2177
  • I did very well note him.
  • I did very well note him.
  • Hamlet. Upon the talk of the poisoning?

    Horatio. I did very well note him.

71 IV, 5, 2871
  • 'Twere good she were spoken with; for she may strew
    Dangerous conjectures in...
  • 'Twere good she were spoken with; for she may strew
    Dangerous conjectures in ill-breeding minds.
  • Gentleman. She speaks much of her father; says she hears
    There's tricks i' th' world, and hems, and beats her heart;
    Spurns enviously at straws; speaks things in doubt,
    That carry but half sense. Her speech is nothing,
    Yet the unshaped use of it doth move
    The hearers to collection; they aim at it,
    And botch the words up fit to their own thoughts;
    Which, as her winks and nods and gestures yield them,
    Indeed would make one think there might be thought,
    Though nothing sure, yet much unhappily.

    Horatio. 'Twere good she were spoken with; for she may strew
    Dangerous conjectures in ill-breeding minds.

72 IV, 6, 3100
  • What are they that would speak with me?
  • What are they that would speak with me?
  • (stage directions). Enter Horatio with an Attendant.

    Horatio. What are they that would speak with me?

73 IV, 6, 3102
  • Let them come in.
    [Exit Attendant.]
    I do not know from what part of the...
  • Let them come in.
    [Exit Attendant.]
    I do not know from what part of the world
    I should be greeted, if not from Lord Hamlet.
  • Servant. Seafaring men, sir. They say they have letters for you.

    Horatio. Let them come in.
    [Exit Attendant.]
    I do not know from what part of the world
    I should be greeted, if not from Lord Hamlet.

74 IV, 6, 3108
  • Let him bless thee too.
  • Let him bless thee too.
  • Sailor. God bless you, sir.

    Horatio. Let him bless thee too.

75 IV, 6, 3112
  • [reads the letter] 'Horatio, when thou shalt have overlook'd
    this, give thes...
  • [reads the letter] 'Horatio, when thou shalt have overlook'd
    this, give these fellows some means to the King. They have
    letters for him. Ere we were two days old at sea, a pirate of
    very warlike appointment gave us chase. Finding ourselves too
    slow of sail, we put on a compelled valour, and in the grapple I
    boarded them. On the instant they got clear of our ship; so I
    alone became their prisoner. They have dealt with me like thieves
    of mercy; but they knew what they did: I am to do a good turn for
    them. Let the King have the letters I have sent, and repair thou
    to me with as much speed as thou wouldst fly death. I have words
    to speak in thine ear will make thee dumb; yet are they much too
    light for the bore of the matter. These good fellows will bring
    thee where I am. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern hold their course
    for England. Of them I have much to tell thee. Farewell.
    'He that thou knowest thine, HAMLET.'
    Come, I will give you way for these your letters,
    And do't the speedier that you may direct me
    To him from whom you brought them. Exeunt.
  • Sailor. 'A shall, sir, an't please him. There's a letter for you,
    sir,- it comes from th' ambassador that was bound for England- if
    your name be Horatio, as I am let to know it is.

    Horatio. [reads the letter] 'Horatio, when thou shalt have overlook'd
    this, give these fellows some means to the King. They have
    letters for him. Ere we were two days old at sea, a pirate of
    very warlike appointment gave us chase. Finding ourselves too
    slow of sail, we put on a compelled valour, and in the grapple I
    boarded them. On the instant they got clear of our ship; so I
    alone became their prisoner. They have dealt with me like thieves
    of mercy; but they knew what they did: I am to do a good turn for
    them. Let the King have the letters I have sent, and repair thou
    to me with as much speed as thou wouldst fly death. I have words
    to speak in thine ear will make thee dumb; yet are they much too
    light for the bore of the matter. These good fellows will bring
    thee where I am. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern hold their course
    for England. Of them I have much to tell thee. Farewell.
    'He that thou knowest thine, HAMLET.'
    Come, I will give you way for these your letters,
    And do't the speedier that you may direct me
    To him from whom you brought them. Exeunt.

76 V, 1, 3409
  • Custom hath made it in him a property of easiness.
  • Custom hath made it in him a property of easiness.
  • Hamlet. Has this fellow no feeling of his business, that he sings at
    grave-making?

    Horatio. Custom hath made it in him a property of easiness.

77 V, 1, 3423
  • It might, my lord.
  • It might, my lord.
  • Hamlet. That skull had a tongue in it, and could sing once. How the
    knave jowls it to the ground,as if 'twere Cain's jawbone, that
    did the first murther! This might be the pate of a Politician,
    which this ass now o'erreaches; one that would circumvent God,
    might it not?

    Horatio. It might, my lord.

78 V, 1, 3428
  • Ay, my lord.
  • Ay, my lord.
  • Hamlet. Or of a courtier, which could say 'Good morrow, sweet lord!
    How dost thou, good lord?' This might be my Lord Such-a-one, that
    prais'd my Lord Such-a-one's horse when he meant to beg it- might
    it not?

    Horatio. Ay, my lord.

79 V, 1, 3453
  • Not a jot more, my lord.
  • Not a jot more, my lord.
  • Hamlet. There's another. Why may not that be the skull of a lawyer?
    Where be his quiddits now, his quillets, his cases, his tenures,
    and his tricks? Why does he suffer this rude knave now to knock
    him about the sconce with a dirty shovel, and will not tell him
    of his action of battery? Hum! This fellow might be in's time a
    great buyer of land, with his statutes, his recognizances, his
    fines, his double vouchers, his recoveries. Is this the fine of
    his fines, and the recovery of his recoveries, to have his fine
    pate full of fine dirt? Will his vouchers vouch him no more of
    his purchases, and double ones too, than the length and breadth
    of a pair of indentures? The very conveyances of his lands will
    scarcely lie in this box; and must th' inheritor himself have no
    more, ha?

    Horatio. Not a jot more, my lord.

80 V, 1, 3455
  • Ay, my lord, And of calveskins too.
  • Ay, my lord, And of calveskins too.
  • Hamlet. Is not parchment made of sheepskins?

    Horatio. Ay, my lord, And of calveskins too.

81 V, 1, 3526
  • What's that, my lord?
  • What's that, my lord?
  • Hamlet. Let me see. [Takes the skull.] Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him,
    Horatio. A fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy. He
    hath borne me on his back a thousand times. And now how abhorred
    in my imagination it is! My gorge rises at it. Here hung those
    lips that I have kiss'd I know not how oft. Where be your gibes
    now? your gambols? your songs? your flashes of merriment that
    were wont to set the table on a roar? Not one now, to mock your
    own grinning? Quite chap- fall'n? Now get you to my lady's
    chamber, and tell her, let her paint an inch thick, to this
    favour she must come. Make her laugh at that. Prithee, Horatio,
    tell me one thing.

    Horatio. What's that, my lord?

82 V, 1, 3528
  • E'en so.
  • E'en so.
  • Hamlet. Dost thou think Alexander look'd o' this fashion i' th' earth?

    Horatio. E'en so.

83 V, 1, 3531
  • E'en so, my lord.
  • E'en so, my lord.
  • (stage directions). [Puts down the skull.]

    Horatio. E'en so, my lord.

84 V, 1, 3535
  • 'Twere to consider too curiously, to consider so.
  • 'Twere to consider too curiously, to consider so.
  • Hamlet. To what base uses we may return, Horatio! Why may not
    imagination trace the noble dust of Alexander till he find it
    stopping a bunghole?

    Horatio. 'Twere to consider too curiously, to consider so.

85 V, 1, 3608
  • Good my lord, be quiet.
  • Good my lord, be quiet.
  • All. Gentlemen!

    Horatio. Good my lord, be quiet.

86 V, 2, 3652
  • Remember it, my lord!
  • Remember it, my lord!
  • Hamlet. So much for this, sir; now shall you see the other.
    You do remember all the circumstance?

    Horatio. Remember it, my lord!

87 V, 2, 3661
  • That is most certain.
  • That is most certain.
  • Hamlet. Sir, in my heart there was a kind of fighting
    That would not let me sleep. Methought I lay
    Worse than the mutinies in the bilboes. Rashly-
    And prais'd be rashness for it; let us know,
    Our indiscretion sometime serves us well
    When our deep plots do pall; and that should learn us
    There's a divinity that shapes our ends,
    Rough-hew them how we will-

    Horatio. That is most certain.

88 V, 2, 3676
  • Is't possible?
  • Is't possible?
  • Hamlet. Up from my cabin,
    My sea-gown scarf'd about me, in the dark
    Grop'd I to find out them; had my desire,
    Finger'd their packet, and in fine withdrew
    To mine own room again; making so bold
    (My fears forgetting manners) to unseal
    Their grand commission; where I found, Horatio
    (O royal knavery!), an exact command,
    Larded with many several sorts of reasons,
    Importing Denmark's health, and England's too,
    With, hoo! such bugs and goblins in my life-
    That, on the supervise, no leisure bated,
    No, not to stay the finding of the axe,
    My head should be struck off.

    Horatio. Is't possible?

89 V, 2, 3679
  • I beseech you.
  • I beseech you.
  • Hamlet. Here's the commission; read it at more leisure.
    But wilt thou bear me how I did proceed?

    Horatio. I beseech you.

90 V, 2, 3689
  • Ay, good my lord.
  • Ay, good my lord.
  • Hamlet. Being thus benetted round with villanies,
    Or I could make a prologue to my brains,
    They had begun the play. I sat me down;
    Devis'd a new commission; wrote it fair.
    I once did hold it, as our statists do,
    A baseness to write fair, and labour'd much
    How to forget that learning; but, sir, now
    It did me yeoman's service. Wilt thou know
    Th' effect of what I wrote?

    Horatio. Ay, good my lord.

91 V, 2, 3700
  • How was this seal'd?
  • How was this seal'd?
  • Hamlet. An earnest conjuration from the King,
    As England was his faithful tributary,
    As love between them like the palm might flourish,
    As peace should still her wheaten garland wear
    And stand a comma 'tween their amities,
    And many such-like as's of great charge,
    That, on the view and knowing of these contents,
    Without debatement further, more or less,
    He should the bearers put to sudden death,
    Not shriving time allow'd.

    Horatio. How was this seal'd?

92 V, 2, 3709
  • So Guildenstern and Rosencrantz go to't.
  • So Guildenstern and Rosencrantz go to't.
  • Hamlet. Why, even in that was heaven ordinant.
    I had my father's signet in my purse,
    Which was the model of that Danish seal;
    Folded the writ up in the form of th' other,
    Subscrib'd it, gave't th' impression, plac'd it safely,
    The changeling never known. Now, the next day
    Was our sea-fight; and what to this was sequent
    Thou know'st already.

    Horatio. So Guildenstern and Rosencrantz go to't.

93 V, 2, 3716
  • Why, what a king is this!
  • Why, what a king is this!
  • Hamlet. Why, man, they did make love to this employment!
    They are not near my conscience; their defeat
    Does by their own insinuation grow.
    'Tis dangerous when the baser nature comes
    Between the pass and fell incensed points
    Of mighty opposites.

    Horatio. Why, what a king is this!

94 V, 2, 3725
  • It must be shortly known to him from England
    What is the issue of the busine...
  • It must be shortly known to him from England
    What is the issue of the business there.
  • Hamlet. Does it not, thinks't thee, stand me now upon-
    He that hath kill'd my king, and whor'd my mother;
    Popp'd in between th' election and my hopes;
    Thrown out his angle for my proper life,
    And with such coz'nage- is't not perfect conscience
    To quit him with this arm? And is't not to be damn'd
    To let this canker of our nature come
    In further evil?

    Horatio. It must be shortly known to him from England
    What is the issue of the business there.

95 V, 2, 3735
  • Peace! Who comes here?
  • Peace! Who comes here?
  • Hamlet. It will be short; the interim is mine,
    And a man's life is no more than to say 'one.'
    But I am very sorry, good Horatio,
    That to Laertes I forgot myself,
    For by the image of my cause I see
    The portraiture of his. I'll court his favours.
    But sure the bravery of his grief did put me
    Into a tow'ring passion.

    Horatio. Peace! Who comes here?

96 V, 2, 3740
  • [aside to Hamlet] No, my good lord.
  • [aside to Hamlet] No, my good lord.
  • Hamlet. I humbly thank you, sir. [Aside to Horatio] Dost know this
    waterfly?

    Horatio. [aside to Hamlet] No, my good lord.

97 V, 2, 3774
  • [aside to Hamlet] Is't not possible to understand in another
    tongue? You wil...
  • [aside to Hamlet] Is't not possible to understand in another
    tongue? You will do't, sir, really.
  • Osric. Sir?

    Horatio. [aside to Hamlet] Is't not possible to understand in another
    tongue? You will do't, sir, really.

98 V, 2, 3778
  • [aside] His purse is empty already. All's golden words are
    spent.
  • [aside] His purse is empty already. All's golden words are
    spent.
  • Osric. Of Laertes?

    Horatio. [aside] His purse is empty already. All's golden words are
    spent.

99 V, 2, 3799
  • [aside to Hamlet] I knew you must be edified by the margent
    ere you had done...
  • [aside to Hamlet] I knew you must be edified by the margent
    ere you had done.
  • Hamlet. What call you the carriages?

    Horatio. [aside to Hamlet] I knew you must be edified by the margent
    ere you had done.

100 V, 2, 3823
  • This lapwing runs away with the shell on his head.
  • This lapwing runs away with the shell on his head.
  • Hamlet. Yours, yours. [Exit Osric.] He does well to commend it
    himself; there are no tongues else for's turn.

    Horatio. This lapwing runs away with the shell on his head.

101 V, 2, 3844
  • You will lose this wager, my lord.
  • You will lose this wager, my lord.
  • (stage directions). [Exit Lord.]

    Horatio. You will lose this wager, my lord.

102 V, 2, 3848
  • Nay, good my lord--
  • Nay, good my lord--
  • Hamlet. I do not think so. Since he went into France I have been in
    continual practice. I shall win at the odds. But thou wouldst not
    think how ill all's here about my heart. But it is no matter.

    Horatio. Nay, good my lord--

103 V, 2, 3851
  • If your mind dislike anything, obey it. I will forestall their
    repair hither...
  • If your mind dislike anything, obey it. I will forestall their
    repair hither and say you are not fit.
  • Hamlet. It is but foolery; but it is such a kind of gaingiving as
    would perhaps trouble a woman.

    Horatio. If your mind dislike anything, obey it. I will forestall their
    repair hither and say you are not fit.

104 V, 2, 3960
  • They bleed on both sides. How is it, my lord?
  • They bleed on both sides. How is it, my lord?
  • Osric. Look to the Queen there, ho!

    Horatio. They bleed on both sides. How is it, my lord?

105 V, 2, 3999
  • Never believe it.
    I am more an antique Roman than a Dane.
    Here's yet som...
  • Never believe it.
    I am more an antique Roman than a Dane.
    Here's yet some liquor left.
  • Hamlet. Heaven make thee free of it! I follow thee.
    I am dead, Horatio. Wretched queen, adieu!
    You that look pale and tremble at this chance,
    That are but mutes or audience to this act,
    Had I but time (as this fell sergeant, Death,
    Is strict in his arrest) O, I could tell you-
    But let it be. Horatio, I am dead;
    Thou liv'st; report me and my cause aright
    To the unsatisfied.

    Horatio. Never believe it.
    I am more an antique Roman than a Dane.
    Here's yet some liquor left.

106 V, 2, 4021
  • Now cracks a noble heart. Good night, sweet prince,
    And flights of angels si...
  • Now cracks a noble heart. Good night, sweet prince,
    And flights of angels sing thee to thy rest!
    [March within.]
    Why does the drum come hither?
    Enter Fortinbras and English Ambassadors, with Drum, Colours, and Attendants.
  • Hamlet. O, I die, Horatio!
    The potent poison quite o'ercrows my spirit.
    I cannot live to hear the news from England,
    But I do prophesy th' election lights
    On Fortinbras. He has my dying voice.
    So tell him, with th' occurrents, more and less,
    Which have solicited- the rest is silence. Dies.

    Horatio. Now cracks a noble heart. Good night, sweet prince,
    And flights of angels sing thee to thy rest!
    [March within.]
    Why does the drum come hither?
    Enter Fortinbras and English Ambassadors, with Drum, Colours, and Attendants.

107 V, 2, 4027
  • What is it you will see?
    If aught of woe or wonder, cease your search.
  • What is it you will see?
    If aught of woe or wonder, cease your search.
  • Fortinbras. Where is this sight?

    Horatio. What is it you will see?
    If aught of woe or wonder, cease your search.

108 V, 2, 4039
  • Not from his mouth,
    Had it th' ability of life to thank you.
    He never ga...
  • Not from his mouth,
    Had it th' ability of life to thank you.
    He never gave commandment for their death.
    But since, so jump upon this bloody question,
    You from the Polack wars, and you from England,
    Are here arriv'd, give order that these bodies
    High on a stage be placed to the view;
    And let me speak to the yet unknowing world
    How these things came about. So shall you hear
    Of carnal, bloody and unnatural acts;
    Of accidental judgments, casual slaughters;
    Of deaths put on by cunning and forc'd cause;
    And, in this upshot, purposes mistook
    Fall'n on th' inventors' heads. All this can I
    Truly deliver.
  • Ambassador. The sight is dismal;
    And our affairs from England come too late.
    The ears are senseless that should give us hearing
    To tell him his commandment is fulfill'd
    That Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are dead.
    Where should we have our thanks?

    Horatio. Not from his mouth,
    Had it th' ability of life to thank you.
    He never gave commandment for their death.
    But since, so jump upon this bloody question,
    You from the Polack wars, and you from England,
    Are here arriv'd, give order that these bodies
    High on a stage be placed to the view;
    And let me speak to the yet unknowing world
    How these things came about. So shall you hear
    Of carnal, bloody and unnatural acts;
    Of accidental judgments, casual slaughters;
    Of deaths put on by cunning and forc'd cause;
    And, in this upshot, purposes mistook
    Fall'n on th' inventors' heads. All this can I
    Truly deliver.

109 V, 2, 4059
  • Of that I shall have also cause to speak,
    And from his mouth whose voice wil...
  • Of that I shall have also cause to speak,
    And from his mouth whose voice will draw on more.
    But let this same be presently perform'd,
    Even while men's minds are wild, lest more mischance
    On plots and errors happen.
  • Fortinbras. Let us haste to hear it,
    And call the noblest to the audience.
    For me, with sorrow I embrace my fortune.
    I have some rights of memory in this kingdom
    Which now, to claim my vantage doth invite me.

    Horatio. Of that I shall have also cause to speak,
    And from his mouth whose voice will draw on more.
    But let this same be presently perform'd,
    Even while men's minds are wild, lest more mischance
    On plots and errors happen.

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