Speeches (Lines) for IRAS in "Antony and Cleopatra"

Total: 18
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 2
  • No, you shall paint when you are old.
  • No, you shall paint when you are old.
  • Charmian. He means in flesh.

    IRAS. No, you shall paint when you are old.

2 I / 2
  • There's a palm presages chastity, if nothing else.
  • There's a palm presages chastity, if nothing else.
  • DOMITIUS ENOBARBUS. Mine, and most of our fortunes, to-night, shall
    be--drunk to bed.

    IRAS. There's a palm presages chastity, if nothing else.

3 I / 2
  • Go, you wild bedfellow, you cannot soothsay.
  • Go, you wild bedfellow, you cannot soothsay.
  • Charmian. E'en as the o'erflowing Nilus presageth famine.

    IRAS. Go, you wild bedfellow, you cannot soothsay.

4 I / 2
  • But how, but how? give me particulars.
  • But how, but how? give me particulars.
  • Soothsayer. Your fortunes are alike.

    IRAS. But how, but how? give me particulars.

5 I / 2
  • Am I not an inch of fortune better than she?
  • Am I not an inch of fortune better than she?
  • Soothsayer. I have said.

    IRAS. Am I not an inch of fortune better than she?

6 I / 2
  • Not in my husband's nose.
  • Not in my husband's nose.
  • Charmian. Well, if you were but an inch of fortune better than
    I, where would you choose it?

    IRAS. Not in my husband's nose.

7 I / 2
  • Amen. Dear goddess, hear that prayer of the people!
    for, as it is a heartbre...
  • Amen. Dear goddess, hear that prayer of the people!
    for, as it is a heartbreaking to see a handsome man
    loose-wived, so it is a deadly sorrow to behold a
    foul knave uncuckolded: therefore, dear Isis, keep
    decorum, and fortune him accordingly!
  • Charmian. Our worser thoughts heavens mend! Alexas,--come,
    his fortune, his fortune! O, let him marry a woman
    that cannot go, sweet Isis, I beseech thee! and let
    her die too, and give him a worse! and let worst
    follow worse, till the worst of all follow him
    laughing to his grave, fifty-fold a cuckold! Good
    Isis, hear me this prayer, though thou deny me a
    matter of more weight; good Isis, I beseech thee!

    IRAS. Amen. Dear goddess, hear that prayer of the people!
    for, as it is a heartbreaking to see a handsome man
    loose-wived, so it is a deadly sorrow to behold a
    foul knave uncuckolded: therefore, dear Isis, keep
    decorum, and fortune him accordingly!

8 III / 11
  • Do, most dear queen.
  • Do, most dear queen.
  • EROS. Nay, gentle madam, to him, comfort him.

    IRAS. Do, most dear queen.

9 III / 11
  • Madam, O good empress!
  • Madam, O good empress!
  • Charmian. Madam!

    IRAS. Madam, O good empress!

10 III / 11
  • Go to him, madam, speak to him:
    He is unqualitied with very shame.
  • Go to him, madam, speak to him:
    He is unqualitied with very shame.
  • EROS. The queen, my lord, the queen.

    IRAS. Go to him, madam, speak to him:
    He is unqualitied with very shame.

11 IV / 15
  • She is dead too, our sovereign.
  • She is dead too, our sovereign.
  • Charmian. O, quietness, lady!

    IRAS. She is dead too, our sovereign.

12 IV / 15
  • Madam!
  • Madam!
  • Charmian. Lady!

    IRAS. Madam!

13 IV / 15
  • Royal Egypt, Empress!
  • Royal Egypt, Empress!
  • Charmian. O madam, madam, madam!

    IRAS. Royal Egypt, Empress!

14 V / 2
  • Royal queen!
  • Royal queen!
  • GALLUS. You see how easily she may be surprised:
    [Here PROCULEIUS and two of the Guard ascend the]
    monument by a ladder placed against a window, and,
    having descended, come behind CLEOPATRA. Some of
    the Guard unbar and open the gates]
    [To PROCULEIUS and the Guard]
    Guard her till Caesar come.

    IRAS. Royal queen!

15 V / 2
  • Finish, good lady; the bright day is done,
    And we are for the dark.
  • Finish, good lady; the bright day is done,
    And we are for the dark.
  • CLEOPATRA. He words me, girls, he words me, that I should not
    Be noble to myself: but, hark thee, Charmian.

    IRAS. Finish, good lady; the bright day is done,
    And we are for the dark.

16 V / 2
  • The gods forbid!
  • The gods forbid!
  • CLEOPATRA. Farewell, and thanks.
    [Exit DOLABELLA]
    Now, Iras, what think'st thou?
    Thou, an Egyptian puppet, shalt be shown
    In Rome, as well as I. mechanic slaves
    With greasy aprons, rules, and hammers, shall
    Uplift us to the view; in their thick breaths,
    Rank of gross diet, shall be enclouded,
    And forced to drink their vapour.

    IRAS. The gods forbid!

17 V / 2
  • O the good gods!
  • O the good gods!
  • CLEOPATRA. Nay, 'tis most certain, Iras: saucy lictors
    Will catch at us, like strumpets; and scald rhymers
    Ballad us out o' tune: the quick comedians
    Extemporally will stage us, and present
    Our Alexandrian revels; Antony
    Shall be brought drunken forth, and I shall see
    Some squeaking Cleopatra boy my greatness
    I' the posture of a whore.

    IRAS. O the good gods!

18 V / 2
  • I'll never see 't; for, I am sure, my nails
    Are stronger than mine eyes.
  • I'll never see 't; for, I am sure, my nails
    Are stronger than mine eyes.
  • CLEOPATRA. Nay, that's certain.

    IRAS. I'll never see 't; for, I am sure, my nails
    Are stronger than mine eyes.

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© Copyright 2017-2023 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.