Speeches (Lines) for Father John Hume in "History of Henry VI, Part II"

Total: 6
print
# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 2
  • Jesus preserve your royal majesty!
  • Jesus preserve your royal majesty!
  • Eleanor. Yes, my good lord, I'll follow presently.
    [Exeunt GLOUCESTER and Messenger]
    Follow I must; I cannot go before,
    While Gloucester bears this base and humble mind.
    Were I a man, a duke, and next of blood,
    I would remove these tedious stumbling-blocks
    And smooth my way upon their headless necks;
    And, being a woman, I will not be slack
    To play my part in Fortune's pageant.
    Where are you there? Sir John! nay, fear not, man,
    We are alone; here's none but thee and I.

    Father John Hume. Jesus preserve your royal majesty!

2 I / 2
  • But, by the grace of God, and Hume's advice,
    Your grace's title shall be mul...
  • But, by the grace of God, and Hume's advice,
    Your grace's title shall be multiplied.
  • Eleanor. What say'st thou? majesty! I am but grace.

    Father John Hume. But, by the grace of God, and Hume's advice,
    Your grace's title shall be multiplied.

3 I / 2
  • This they have promised, to show your highness
    A spirit raised from depth of...
  • This they have promised, to show your highness
    A spirit raised from depth of under-ground,
    That shall make answer to such questions
    As by your grace shall be propounded him.
  • Eleanor. What say'st thou, man? hast thou as yet conferr'd
    With Margery Jourdain, the cunning witch,
    With Roger Bolingbroke, the conjurer?
    And will they undertake to do me good?

    Father John Hume. This they have promised, to show your highness
    A spirit raised from depth of under-ground,
    That shall make answer to such questions
    As by your grace shall be propounded him.

4 I / 2
  • Hume must make merry with the duchess' gold;
    Marry, and shall. But how now,...
  • Hume must make merry with the duchess' gold;
    Marry, and shall. But how now, Sir John Hume!
    Seal up your lips, and give no words but mum:
    The business asketh silent secrecy.
    Dame Eleanor gives gold to bring the witch:
    Gold cannot come amiss, were she a devil.
    Yet have I gold flies from another coast;
    I dare not say, from the rich cardinal
    And from the great and new-made Duke of Suffolk,
    Yet I do find it so; for to be plain,
    They, knowing Dame Eleanor's aspiring humour,
    Have hired me to undermine the duchess
    And buz these conjurations in her brain.
    They say 'A crafty knave does need no broker;'
    Yet am I Suffolk and the cardinal's broker.
    Hume, if you take not heed, you shall go near
    To call them both a pair of crafty knaves.
    Well, so it stands; and thus, I fear, at last
    Hume's knavery will be the duchess' wreck,
    And her attainture will be Humphrey's fall:
    Sort how it will, I shall have gold for all.
  • Eleanor. It is enough; I'll think upon the questions:
    When from St. Alban's we do make return,
    We'll see these things effected to the full.
    Here, Hume, take this reward; make merry, man,
    With thy confederates in this weighty cause.

    Father John Hume. Hume must make merry with the duchess' gold;
    Marry, and shall. But how now, Sir John Hume!
    Seal up your lips, and give no words but mum:
    The business asketh silent secrecy.
    Dame Eleanor gives gold to bring the witch:
    Gold cannot come amiss, were she a devil.
    Yet have I gold flies from another coast;
    I dare not say, from the rich cardinal
    And from the great and new-made Duke of Suffolk,
    Yet I do find it so; for to be plain,
    They, knowing Dame Eleanor's aspiring humour,
    Have hired me to undermine the duchess
    And buz these conjurations in her brain.
    They say 'A crafty knave does need no broker;'
    Yet am I Suffolk and the cardinal's broker.
    Hume, if you take not heed, you shall go near
    To call them both a pair of crafty knaves.
    Well, so it stands; and thus, I fear, at last
    Hume's knavery will be the duchess' wreck,
    And her attainture will be Humphrey's fall:
    Sort how it will, I shall have gold for all.

5 I / 4
  • Come, my masters; the duchess, I tell you, expects
    performance of your promi...
  • Come, my masters; the duchess, I tell you, expects
    performance of your promises.
  • Henry VI. Away with them to prison; and the day of combat
    shall be the last of the next month. Come,
    Somerset, we'll see thee sent away.

    Father John Hume. Come, my masters; the duchess, I tell you, expects
    performance of your promises.

6 I / 4
  • Ay, what else? fear you not her courage.
  • Ay, what else? fear you not her courage.
  • Bolingbroke. Master Hume, we are therefore provided: will her
    ladyship behold and hear our exorcisms?

    Father John Hume. Ay, what else? fear you not her courage.

© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.

shakespeare_network

© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.