Speeches (Lines) for King John in "History of King John"

Total: 95
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 1
  • Now, say, Chatillon, what would France with us?
  • Now, say, Chatillon, what would France with us?
  • .

    King John. Now, say, Chatillon, what would France with us?

2 I / 1
  • Silence, good mother; hear the embassy.
  • Silence, good mother; hear the embassy.
  • Queen Elinor. A strange beginning: 'borrow'd majesty!'

    King John. Silence, good mother; hear the embassy.

3 I / 1
  • What follows if we disallow of this?
  • What follows if we disallow of this?
  • Chatillon. Philip of France, in right and true behalf
    Of thy deceased brother Geffrey's son,
    Arthur Plantagenet, lays most lawful claim
    To this fair island and the territories,
    To Ireland, Poictiers, Anjou, Touraine, Maine,
    Desiring thee to lay aside the sword
    Which sways usurpingly these several titles,
    And put these same into young Arthur's hand,
    Thy nephew and right royal sovereign.

    King John. What follows if we disallow of this?

4 I / 1
  • Here have we war for war and blood for blood,
    Controlment for controlment: s...
  • Here have we war for war and blood for blood,
    Controlment for controlment: so answer France.
  • Chatillon. The proud control of fierce and bloody war,
    To enforce these rights so forcibly withheld.

    King John. Here have we war for war and blood for blood,
    Controlment for controlment: so answer France.

5 I / 1
  • Bear mine to him, and so depart in peace:
    Be thou as lightning in the eyes o...
  • Bear mine to him, and so depart in peace:
    Be thou as lightning in the eyes of France;
    For ere thou canst report I will be there,
    The thunder of my cannon shall be heard:
    So hence! Be thou the trumpet of our wrath
    And sullen presage of your own decay.
    An honourable conduct let him have:
    Pembroke, look to 't. Farewell, Chatillon.
  • Chatillon. Then take my king's defiance from my mouth,
    The farthest limit of my embassy.

    King John. Bear mine to him, and so depart in peace:
    Be thou as lightning in the eyes of France;
    For ere thou canst report I will be there,
    The thunder of my cannon shall be heard:
    So hence! Be thou the trumpet of our wrath
    And sullen presage of your own decay.
    An honourable conduct let him have:
    Pembroke, look to 't. Farewell, Chatillon.

6 I / 1
  • Our strong possession and our right for us.
  • Our strong possession and our right for us.
  • Queen Elinor. What now, my son! have I not ever said
    How that ambitious Constance would not cease
    Till she had kindled France and all the world,
    Upon the right and party of her son?
    This might have been prevented and made whole
    With very easy arguments of love,
    Which now the manage of two kingdoms must
    With fearful bloody issue arbitrate.

    King John. Our strong possession and our right for us.

7 I / 1
  • Let them approach.
    Our abbeys and our priories shall pay
    This expedition...
  • Let them approach.
    Our abbeys and our priories shall pay
    This expedition's charge.
    [Enter ROBERT and the BASTARD]
    What men are you?
  • Essex. My liege, here is the strangest controversy
    Come from country to be judged by you,
    That e'er I heard: shall I produce the men?

    King John. Let them approach.
    Our abbeys and our priories shall pay
    This expedition's charge.
    [Enter ROBERT and the BASTARD]
    What men are you?

8 I / 1
  • What art thou?
  • What art thou?
  • Philip the Bastard. Your faithful subject I, a gentleman
    Born in Northamptonshire and eldest son,
    As I suppose, to Robert Faulconbridge,
    A soldier, by the honour-giving hand
    Of Coeur-de-lion knighted in the field.

    King John. What art thou?

9 I / 1
  • Is that the elder, and art thou the heir?
    You came not of one mother then, i...
  • Is that the elder, and art thou the heir?
    You came not of one mother then, it seems.
  • Faulconbridge. The son and heir to that same Faulconbridge.

    King John. Is that the elder, and art thou the heir?
    You came not of one mother then, it seems.

10 I / 1
  • A good blunt fellow. Why, being younger born,
    Doth he lay claim to thine inh...
  • A good blunt fellow. Why, being younger born,
    Doth he lay claim to thine inheritance?
  • Philip the Bastard. I, madam? no, I have no reason for it;
    That is my brother's plea and none of mine;
    The which if he can prove, a' pops me out
    At least from fair five hundred pound a year:
    Heaven guard my mother's honour and my land!

    King John. A good blunt fellow. Why, being younger born,
    Doth he lay claim to thine inheritance?

11 I / 1
  • Why, what a madcap hath heaven lent us here!
  • Why, what a madcap hath heaven lent us here!
  • Philip the Bastard. I know not why, except to get the land.
    But once he slander'd me with bastardy:
    But whether I be as true begot or no,
    That still I lay upon my mother's head,
    But that I am as well begot, my liege,--
    Fair fall the bones that took the pains for me!--
    Compare our faces and be judge yourself.
    If old sir Robert did beget us both
    And were our father and this son like him,
    O old sir Robert, father, on my knee
    I give heaven thanks I was not like to thee!

    King John. Why, what a madcap hath heaven lent us here!

12 I / 1
  • Mine eye hath well examined his parts
    And finds them perfect Richard. Sirrah...
  • Mine eye hath well examined his parts
    And finds them perfect Richard. Sirrah, speak,
    What doth move you to claim your brother's land?
  • Queen Elinor. He hath a trick of Coeur-de-lion's face;
    The accent of his tongue affecteth him.
    Do you not read some tokens of my son
    In the large composition of this man?

    King John. Mine eye hath well examined his parts
    And finds them perfect Richard. Sirrah, speak,
    What doth move you to claim your brother's land?

13 I / 1
  • Sirrah, your brother is legitimate;
    Your father's wife did after wedlock bea...
  • Sirrah, your brother is legitimate;
    Your father's wife did after wedlock bear him,
    And if she did play false, the fault was hers;
    Which fault lies on the hazards of all husbands
    That marry wives. Tell me, how if my brother,
    Who, as you say, took pains to get this son,
    Had of your father claim'd this son for his?
    In sooth, good friend, your father might have kept
    This calf bred from his cow from all the world;
    In sooth he might; then, if he were my brother's,
    My brother might not claim him; nor your father,
    Being none of his, refuse him: this concludes;
    My mother's son did get your father's heir;
    Your father's heir must have your father's land.
  • Faulconbridge. And once dispatch'd him in an embassy
    To Germany, there with the emperor
    To treat of high affairs touching that time.
    The advantage of his absence took the king
    And in the mean time sojourn'd at my father's;
    Where how he did prevail I shame to speak,
    But truth is truth: large lengths of seas and shores
    Between my father and my mother lay,
    As I have heard my father speak himself,
    When this same lusty gentleman was got.
    Upon his death-bed he by will bequeath'd
    His lands to me, and took it on his death
    That this my mother's son was none of his;
    And if he were, he came into the world
    Full fourteen weeks before the course of time.
    Then, good my liege, let me have what is mine,
    My father's land, as was my father's will.

    King John. Sirrah, your brother is legitimate;
    Your father's wife did after wedlock bear him,
    And if she did play false, the fault was hers;
    Which fault lies on the hazards of all husbands
    That marry wives. Tell me, how if my brother,
    Who, as you say, took pains to get this son,
    Had of your father claim'd this son for his?
    In sooth, good friend, your father might have kept
    This calf bred from his cow from all the world;
    In sooth he might; then, if he were my brother's,
    My brother might not claim him; nor your father,
    Being none of his, refuse him: this concludes;
    My mother's son did get your father's heir;
    Your father's heir must have your father's land.

14 I / 1
  • What is thy name?
  • What is thy name?
  • Philip the Bastard. Our country manners give our betters way.

    King John. What is thy name?

15 I / 1
  • From henceforth bear his name whose form thou bear'st:
    Kneel thou down Phili...
  • From henceforth bear his name whose form thou bear'st:
    Kneel thou down Philip, but rise more great,
    Arise sir Richard and Plantagenet.
  • Philip the Bastard. Philip, my liege, so is my name begun,
    Philip, good old sir Robert's wife's eldest son.

    King John. From henceforth bear his name whose form thou bear'st:
    Kneel thou down Philip, but rise more great,
    Arise sir Richard and Plantagenet.

16 I / 1
  • Go, Faulconbridge: now hast thou thy desire;
    A landless knight makes thee a...
  • Go, Faulconbridge: now hast thou thy desire;
    A landless knight makes thee a landed squire.
    Come, madam, and come, Richard, we must speed
    For France, for France, for it is more than need.
  • Philip the Bastard. Madam, by chance but not by truth; what though?
    Something about, a little from the right,
    In at the window, or else o'er the hatch:
    Who dares not stir by day must walk by night,
    And have is have, however men do catch:
    Near or far off, well won is still well shot,
    And I am I, howe'er I was begot.

    King John. Go, Faulconbridge: now hast thou thy desire;
    A landless knight makes thee a landed squire.
    Come, madam, and come, Richard, we must speed
    For France, for France, for it is more than need.

17 II / 1
  • Peace be to France, if France in peace permit
    Our just and lineal entrance t...
  • Peace be to France, if France in peace permit
    Our just and lineal entrance to our own;
    If not, bleed France, and peace ascend to heaven,
    Whiles we, God's wrathful agent, do correct
    Their proud contempt that beats His peace to heaven.
  • Lymoges. By how much unexpected, by so much
    We must awake endavour for defence;
    For courage mounteth with occasion:
    Let them be welcome then: we are prepared.
    [Enter KING JOHN, QUEEN ELINOR, BLANCH, the BASTARD,]
    Lords, and forces]

    King John. Peace be to France, if France in peace permit
    Our just and lineal entrance to our own;
    If not, bleed France, and peace ascend to heaven,
    Whiles we, God's wrathful agent, do correct
    Their proud contempt that beats His peace to heaven.

18 II / 1
  • From whom hast thou this great commission, France,
    To draw my answer from th...
  • From whom hast thou this great commission, France,
    To draw my answer from thy articles?
  • King Phillip. Peace be to England, if that war return
    From France to England, there to live in peace.
    England we love; and for that England's sake
    With burden of our armour here we sweat.
    This toil of ours should be a work of thine;
    But thou from loving England art so far,
    That thou hast under-wrought his lawful king
    Cut off the sequence of posterity,
    Out-faced infant state and done a rape
    Upon the maiden virtue of the crown.
    Look here upon thy brother Geffrey's face;
    These eyes, these brows, were moulded out of his:
    This little abstract doth contain that large
    Which died in Geffrey, and the hand of time
    Shall draw this brief into as huge a volume.
    That Geffrey was thy elder brother born,
    And this his son; England was Geffrey's right
    And this is Geffrey's: in the name of God
    How comes it then that thou art call'd a king,
    When living blood doth in these temples beat,
    Which owe the crown that thou o'ermasterest?

    King John. From whom hast thou this great commission, France,
    To draw my answer from thy articles?

19 II / 1
  • Alack, thou dost usurp authority.
  • Alack, thou dost usurp authority.
  • King Phillip. From that supernal judge, that stirs good thoughts
    In any breast of strong authority,
    To look into the blots and stains of right:
    That judge hath made me guardian to this boy:
    Under whose warrant I impeach thy wrong
    And by whose help I mean to chastise it.

    King John. Alack, thou dost usurp authority.

20 II / 1
  • My life as soon: I do defy thee, France.
    Arthur of Bretagne, yield thee to m...
  • My life as soon: I do defy thee, France.
    Arthur of Bretagne, yield thee to my hand;
    And out of my dear love I'll give thee more
    Than e'er the coward hand of France can win:
    Submit thee, boy.
  • Lewis. Women and fools, break off your conference.
    King John, this is the very sum of all;
    England and Ireland, Anjou, Touraine, Maine,
    In right of Arthur do I claim of thee:
    Wilt thou resign them and lay down thy arms?

    King John. My life as soon: I do defy thee, France.
    Arthur of Bretagne, yield thee to my hand;
    And out of my dear love I'll give thee more
    Than e'er the coward hand of France can win:
    Submit thee, boy.

21 II / 1
  • Bedlam, have done.
  • Bedlam, have done.
  • Constance. Thou monstrous injurer of heaven and earth!
    Call not me slanderer; thou and thine usurp
    The dominations, royalties and rights
    Of this oppressed boy: this is thy eld'st son's son,
    Infortunate in nothing but in thee:
    Thy sins are visited in this poor child;
    The canon of the law is laid on him,
    Being but the second generation
    Removed from thy sin-conceiving womb.

    King John. Bedlam, have done.

22 II / 1
  • England, for itself.
    You men of Angiers, and my loving subjects--
  • England, for itself.
    You men of Angiers, and my loving subjects--
  • King Phillip. 'Tis France, for England.

    King John. England, for itself.
    You men of Angiers, and my loving subjects--

23 II / 1
  • For our advantage; therefore hear us first.
    These flags of France, that are...
  • For our advantage; therefore hear us first.
    These flags of France, that are advanced here
    Before the eye and prospect of your town,
    Have hither march'd to your endamagement:
    The cannons have their bowels full of wrath,
    And ready mounted are they to spit forth
    Their iron indignation 'gainst your walls:
    All preparation for a bloody siege
    All merciless proceeding by these French
    Confronts your city's eyes, your winking gates;
    And but for our approach those sleeping stones,
    That as a waist doth girdle you about,
    By the compulsion of their ordinance
    By this time from their fixed beds of lime
    Had been dishabited, and wide havoc made
    For bloody power to rush upon your peace.
    But on the sight of us your lawful king,
    Who painfully with much expedient march
    Have brought a countercheque before your gates,
    To save unscratch'd your city's threatened cheeks,
    Behold, the French amazed vouchsafe a parle;
    And now, instead of bullets wrapp'd in fire,
    To make a shaking fever in your walls,
    They shoot but calm words folded up in smoke,
    To make a faithless error in your ears:
    Which trust accordingly, kind citizens,
    And let us in, your king, whose labour'd spirits,
    Forwearied in this action of swift speed,
    Crave harbourage within your city walls.
  • King Phillip. You loving men of Angiers, Arthur's subjects,
    Our trumpet call'd you to this gentle parle--

    King John. For our advantage; therefore hear us first.
    These flags of France, that are advanced here
    Before the eye and prospect of your town,
    Have hither march'd to your endamagement:
    The cannons have their bowels full of wrath,
    And ready mounted are they to spit forth
    Their iron indignation 'gainst your walls:
    All preparation for a bloody siege
    All merciless proceeding by these French
    Confronts your city's eyes, your winking gates;
    And but for our approach those sleeping stones,
    That as a waist doth girdle you about,
    By the compulsion of their ordinance
    By this time from their fixed beds of lime
    Had been dishabited, and wide havoc made
    For bloody power to rush upon your peace.
    But on the sight of us your lawful king,
    Who painfully with much expedient march
    Have brought a countercheque before your gates,
    To save unscratch'd your city's threatened cheeks,
    Behold, the French amazed vouchsafe a parle;
    And now, instead of bullets wrapp'd in fire,
    To make a shaking fever in your walls,
    They shoot but calm words folded up in smoke,
    To make a faithless error in your ears:
    Which trust accordingly, kind citizens,
    And let us in, your king, whose labour'd spirits,
    Forwearied in this action of swift speed,
    Crave harbourage within your city walls.

24 II / 1
  • Acknowledge then the king, and let me in.
  • Acknowledge then the king, and let me in.
  • First Citizen. In brief, we are the king of England's subjects:
    For him, and in his right, we hold this town.

    King John. Acknowledge then the king, and let me in.

25 II / 1
  • Doth not the crown of England prove the king?
    And if not that, I bring you w...
  • Doth not the crown of England prove the king?
    And if not that, I bring you witnesses,
    Twice fifteen thousand hearts of England's breed,--
  • First Citizen. That can we not; but he that proves the king,
    To him will we prove loyal: till that time
    Have we ramm'd up our gates against the world.

    King John. Doth not the crown of England prove the king?
    And if not that, I bring you witnesses,
    Twice fifteen thousand hearts of England's breed,--

26 II / 1
  • To verify our title with their lives.
  • To verify our title with their lives.
  • Philip the Bastard. Bastards, and else.

    King John. To verify our title with their lives.

27 II / 1
  • Then God forgive the sin of all those souls
    That to their everlasting reside...
  • Then God forgive the sin of all those souls
    That to their everlasting residence,
    Before the dew of evening fall, shall fleet,
    In dreadful trial of our kingdom's king!
  • First Citizen. Till you compound whose right is worthiest,
    We for the worthiest hold the right from both.

    King John. Then God forgive the sin of all those souls
    That to their everlasting residence,
    Before the dew of evening fall, shall fleet,
    In dreadful trial of our kingdom's king!

28 II / 1
  • Up higher to the plain; where we'll set forth
    In best appointment all our re...
  • Up higher to the plain; where we'll set forth
    In best appointment all our regiments.
  • Philip the Bastard. O tremble, for you hear the lion roar.

    King John. Up higher to the plain; where we'll set forth
    In best appointment all our regiments.

29 II / 1
  • France, hast thou yet more blood to cast away?
    Say, shall the current of our...
  • France, hast thou yet more blood to cast away?
    Say, shall the current of our right run on?
    Whose passage, vex'd with thy impediment,
    Shall leave his native channel and o'erswell
    With course disturb'd even thy confining shores,
    Unless thou let his silver water keep
    A peaceful progress to the ocean.
  • First Citizen. Heralds, from off our towers we might behold,
    From first to last, the onset and retire
    Of both your armies; whose equality
    By our best eyes cannot be censured:
    Blood hath bought blood and blows have answered blows;
    Strength match'd with strength, and power confronted power:
    Both are alike; and both alike we like.
    One must prove greatest: while they weigh so even,
    We hold our town for neither, yet for both.
    [Re-enter KING JOHN and KING PHILIP, with their]
    powers, severally]

    King John. France, hast thou yet more blood to cast away?
    Say, shall the current of our right run on?
    Whose passage, vex'd with thy impediment,
    Shall leave his native channel and o'erswell
    With course disturb'd even thy confining shores,
    Unless thou let his silver water keep
    A peaceful progress to the ocean.

30 II / 1
  • Whose party do the townsmen yet admit?
  • Whose party do the townsmen yet admit?
  • Philip the Bastard. Ha, majesty! how high thy glory towers,
    When the rich blood of kings is set on fire!
    O, now doth Death line his dead chaps with steel;
    The swords of soldiers are his teeth, his fangs;
    And now he feasts, mousing the flesh of men,
    In undetermined differences of kings.
    Why stand these royal fronts amazed thus?
    Cry, 'havoc!' kings; back to the stained field,
    You equal potents, fiery kindled spirits!
    Then let confusion of one part confirm
    The other's peace: till then, blows, blood and death!

    King John. Whose party do the townsmen yet admit?

31 II / 1
  • In us, that are our own great deputy
    And bear possession of our person here,...
  • In us, that are our own great deputy
    And bear possession of our person here,
    Lord of our presence, Angiers, and of you.
  • King Phillip. Know him in us, that here hold up his right.

    King John. In us, that are our own great deputy
    And bear possession of our person here,
    Lord of our presence, Angiers, and of you.

32 II / 1
  • Now, by the sky that hangs above our heads,
    I like it well. France, shall we...
  • Now, by the sky that hangs above our heads,
    I like it well. France, shall we knit our powers
    And lay this Angiers even to the ground;
    Then after fight who shall be king of it?
  • Philip the Bastard. By heaven, these scroyles of Angiers flout you, kings,
    And stand securely on their battlements,
    As in a theatre, whence they gape and point
    At your industrious scenes and acts of death.
    Your royal presences be ruled by me:
    Do like the mutines of Jerusalem,
    Be friends awhile and both conjointly bend
    Your sharpest deeds of malice on this town:
    By east and west let France and England mount
    Their battering cannon charged to the mouths,
    Till their soul-fearing clamours have brawl'd down
    The flinty ribs of this contemptuous city:
    I'ld play incessantly upon these jades,
    Even till unfenced desolation
    Leave them as naked as the vulgar air.
    That done, dissever your united strengths,
    And part your mingled colours once again;
    Turn face to face and bloody point to point;
    Then, in a moment, Fortune shall cull forth
    Out of one side her happy minion,
    To whom in favour she shall give the day,
    And kiss him with a glorious victory.
    How like you this wild counsel, mighty states?
    Smacks it not something of the policy?

    King John. Now, by the sky that hangs above our heads,
    I like it well. France, shall we knit our powers
    And lay this Angiers even to the ground;
    Then after fight who shall be king of it?

33 II / 1
  • We from the west will send destruction
    Into this city's bosom.
  • We from the west will send destruction
    Into this city's bosom.
  • King Phillip. Let it be so. Say, where will you assault?

    King John. We from the west will send destruction
    Into this city's bosom.

34 II / 1
  • Speak on with favour; we are bent to hear.
  • Speak on with favour; we are bent to hear.
  • First Citizen. Hear us, great kings: vouchsafe awhile to stay,
    And I shall show you peace and fair-faced league;
    Win you this city without stroke or wound;
    Rescue those breathing lives to die in beds,
    That here come sacrifices for the field:
    Persever not, but hear me, mighty kings.

    King John. Speak on with favour; we are bent to hear.

35 II / 1
  • If that the Dauphin there, thy princely son,
    Can in this book of beauty read...
  • If that the Dauphin there, thy princely son,
    Can in this book of beauty read 'I love,'
    Her dowry shall weigh equal with a queen:
    For Anjou and fair Touraine, Maine, Poictiers,
    And all that we upon this side the sea,
    Except this city now by us besieged,
    Find liable to our crown and dignity,
    Shall gild her bridal bed and make her rich
    In titles, honours and promotions,
    As she in beauty, education, blood,
    Holds hand with any princess of the world.
  • King Phillip. Speak England first, that hath been forward first
    To speak unto this city: what say you?

    King John. If that the Dauphin there, thy princely son,
    Can in this book of beauty read 'I love,'
    Her dowry shall weigh equal with a queen:
    For Anjou and fair Touraine, Maine, Poictiers,
    And all that we upon this side the sea,
    Except this city now by us besieged,
    Find liable to our crown and dignity,
    Shall gild her bridal bed and make her rich
    In titles, honours and promotions,
    As she in beauty, education, blood,
    Holds hand with any princess of the world.

36 II / 1
  • What say these young ones? What say you my niece?
  • What say these young ones? What say you my niece?
  • Blanch. My uncle's will in this respect is mine:
    If he see aught in you that makes him like,
    That any thing he sees, which moves his liking,
    I can with ease translate it to my will;
    Or if you will, to speak more properly,
    I will enforce it easily to my love.
    Further I will not flatter you, my lord,
    That all I see in you is worthy love,
    Than this; that nothing do I see in you,
    Though churlish thoughts themselves should be your judge,
    That I can find should merit any hate.

    King John. What say these young ones? What say you my niece?

37 II / 1
  • Speak then, prince Dauphin; can you love this lady?
  • Speak then, prince Dauphin; can you love this lady?
  • Blanch. That she is bound in honour still to do
    What you in wisdom still vouchsafe to say.

    King John. Speak then, prince Dauphin; can you love this lady?

38 II / 1
  • Then do I give Volquessen, Touraine, Maine,
    Poictiers and Anjou, these five...
  • Then do I give Volquessen, Touraine, Maine,
    Poictiers and Anjou, these five provinces,
    With her to thee; and this addition more,
    Full thirty thousand marks of English coin.
    Philip of France, if thou be pleased withal,
    Command thy son and daughter to join hands.
  • Lewis. Nay, ask me if I can refrain from love;
    For I do love her most unfeignedly.

    King John. Then do I give Volquessen, Touraine, Maine,
    Poictiers and Anjou, these five provinces,
    With her to thee; and this addition more,
    Full thirty thousand marks of English coin.
    Philip of France, if thou be pleased withal,
    Command thy son and daughter to join hands.

39 II / 1
  • We will heal up all;
    For we'll create young Arthur Duke of Bretagne
    And...
  • We will heal up all;
    For we'll create young Arthur Duke of Bretagne
    And Earl of Richmond; and this rich fair town
    We make him lord of. Call the Lady Constance;
    Some speedy messenger bid her repair
    To our solemnity: I trust we shall,
    If not fill up the measure of her will,
    Yet in some measure satisfy her so
    That we shall stop her exclamation.
    Go we, as well as haste will suffer us,
    To this unlook'd for, unprepared pomp.
  • King Phillip. And, by my faith, this league that we have made
    Will give her sadness very little cure.
    Brother of England, how may we content
    This widow lady? In her right we came;
    Which we, God knows, have turn'd another way,
    To our own vantage.

    King John. We will heal up all;
    For we'll create young Arthur Duke of Bretagne
    And Earl of Richmond; and this rich fair town
    We make him lord of. Call the Lady Constance;
    Some speedy messenger bid her repair
    To our solemnity: I trust we shall,
    If not fill up the measure of her will,
    Yet in some measure satisfy her so
    That we shall stop her exclamation.
    Go we, as well as haste will suffer us,
    To this unlook'd for, unprepared pomp.

40 III / 1
  • We like not this; thou dost forget thyself.
  • We like not this; thou dost forget thyself.
  • Philip the Bastard. And hang a calf's-skin on those recreant limbs.

    King John. We like not this; thou dost forget thyself.

41 III / 1
  • What earthy name to interrogatories
    Can task the free breath of a sacred kin...
  • What earthy name to interrogatories
    Can task the free breath of a sacred king?
    Thou canst not, cardinal, devise a name
    So slight, unworthy and ridiculous,
    To charge me to an answer, as the pope.
    Tell him this tale; and from the mouth of England
    Add thus much more, that no Italian priest
    Shall tithe or toll in our dominions;
    But as we, under heaven, are supreme head,
    So under Him that great supremacy,
    Where we do reign, we will alone uphold,
    Without the assistance of a mortal hand:
    So tell the pope, all reverence set apart
    To him and his usurp'd authority.
  • Cardinal Pandulph. Hail, you anointed deputies of heaven!
    To thee, King John, my holy errand is.
    I Pandulph, of fair Milan cardinal,
    And from Pope Innocent the legate here,
    Do in his name religiously demand
    Why thou against the church, our holy mother,
    So wilfully dost spurn; and force perforce
    Keep Stephen Langton, chosen archbishop
    Of Canterbury, from that holy see?
    This, in our foresaid holy father's name,
    Pope Innocent, I do demand of thee.

    King John. What earthy name to interrogatories
    Can task the free breath of a sacred king?
    Thou canst not, cardinal, devise a name
    So slight, unworthy and ridiculous,
    To charge me to an answer, as the pope.
    Tell him this tale; and from the mouth of England
    Add thus much more, that no Italian priest
    Shall tithe or toll in our dominions;
    But as we, under heaven, are supreme head,
    So under Him that great supremacy,
    Where we do reign, we will alone uphold,
    Without the assistance of a mortal hand:
    So tell the pope, all reverence set apart
    To him and his usurp'd authority.

42 III / 1
  • Though you and all the kings of Christendom
    Are led so grossly by this meddl...
  • Though you and all the kings of Christendom
    Are led so grossly by this meddling priest,
    Dreading the curse that money may buy out;
    And by the merit of vile gold, dross, dust,
    Purchase corrupted pardon of a man,
    Who in that sale sells pardon from himself,
    Though you and all the rest so grossly led
    This juggling witchcraft with revenue cherish,
    Yet I alone, alone do me oppose
    Against the pope and count his friends my foes.
  • King Phillip. Brother of England, you blaspheme in this.

    King John. Though you and all the kings of Christendom
    Are led so grossly by this meddling priest,
    Dreading the curse that money may buy out;
    And by the merit of vile gold, dross, dust,
    Purchase corrupted pardon of a man,
    Who in that sale sells pardon from himself,
    Though you and all the rest so grossly led
    This juggling witchcraft with revenue cherish,
    Yet I alone, alone do me oppose
    Against the pope and count his friends my foes.

43 III / 1
  • Philip, what say'st thou to the cardinal?
  • Philip, what say'st thou to the cardinal?
  • Philip the Bastard. Your breeches best may carry them.

    King John. Philip, what say'st thou to the cardinal?

44 III / 1
  • The king is moved, and answers not to this.
  • The king is moved, and answers not to this.
  • Constance. O, if thou grant my need,
    Which only lives but by the death of faith,
    That need must needs infer this principle,
    That faith would live again by death of need.
    O then, tread down my need, and faith mounts up;
    Keep my need up, and faith is trodden down!

    King John. The king is moved, and answers not to this.

45 III / 1
  • France, thou shalt rue this hour within this hour.
  • France, thou shalt rue this hour within this hour.
  • Queen Elinor. O foul revolt of French inconstancy!

    King John. France, thou shalt rue this hour within this hour.

46 III / 1
  • Cousin, go draw our puissance together.
    [Exit BASTARD]
    France, I am burn...
  • Cousin, go draw our puissance together.
    [Exit BASTARD]
    France, I am burn'd up with inflaming wrath;
    A rage whose heat hath this condition,
    That nothing can allay, nothing but blood,
    The blood, and dearest-valued blood, of France.
  • Blanch. There where my fortune lives, there my life dies.

    King John. Cousin, go draw our puissance together.
    [Exit BASTARD]
    France, I am burn'd up with inflaming wrath;
    A rage whose heat hath this condition,
    That nothing can allay, nothing but blood,
    The blood, and dearest-valued blood, of France.

47 III / 1
  • No more than he that threats. To arms let's hie!
  • No more than he that threats. To arms let's hie!
  • King Phillip. Thy rage sham burn thee up, and thou shalt turn
    To ashes, ere our blood shall quench that fire:
    Look to thyself, thou art in jeopardy.

    King John. No more than he that threats. To arms let's hie!

48 III / 2
  • Hubert, keep this boy. Philip, make up:
    My mother is assailed in our tent, <...
  • Hubert, keep this boy. Philip, make up:
    My mother is assailed in our tent,
    And ta'en, I fear.
  • Philip the Bastard. Now, by my life, this day grows wondrous hot;
    Some airy devil hovers in the sky
    And pours down mischief. Austria's head lie there,
    While Philip breathes.

    King John. Hubert, keep this boy. Philip, make up:
    My mother is assailed in our tent,
    And ta'en, I fear.

49 III / 3
  • [To QUEEN ELINOR] So shall it be; your grace shall
    stay behind
    So strong...
  • [To QUEEN ELINOR] So shall it be; your grace shall
    stay behind
    So strongly guarded.
    [To ARTHUR]
    Cousin, look not sad:
    Thy grandam loves thee; and thy uncle will
    As dear be to thee as thy father was.
  • Philip the Bastard. My lord, I rescued her;
    Her highness is in safety, fear you not:
    But on, my liege; for very little pains
    Will bring this labour to an happy end.

    King John. [To QUEEN ELINOR] So shall it be; your grace shall
    stay behind
    So strongly guarded.
    [To ARTHUR]
    Cousin, look not sad:
    Thy grandam loves thee; and thy uncle will
    As dear be to thee as thy father was.

50 III / 3
  • [To the BASTARD] Cousin, away for England!
    haste before:
    And, ere our co...
  • [To the BASTARD] Cousin, away for England!
    haste before:
    And, ere our coming, see thou shake the bags
    Of hoarding abbots; imprisoned angels
    Set at liberty: the fat ribs of peace
    Must by the hungry now be fed upon:
    Use our commission in his utmost force.
  • Arthur. O, this will make my mother die with grief!

    King John. [To the BASTARD] Cousin, away for England!
    haste before:
    And, ere our coming, see thou shake the bags
    Of hoarding abbots; imprisoned angels
    Set at liberty: the fat ribs of peace
    Must by the hungry now be fed upon:
    Use our commission in his utmost force.

51 III / 3
  • Coz, farewell.
  • Coz, farewell.
  • Queen Elinor. Farewell, gentle cousin.

    King John. Coz, farewell.

52 III / 3
  • Come hither, Hubert. O my gentle Hubert,
    We owe thee much! within this wall...
  • Come hither, Hubert. O my gentle Hubert,
    We owe thee much! within this wall of flesh
    There is a soul counts thee her creditor
    And with advantage means to pay thy love:
    And my good friend, thy voluntary oath
    Lives in this bosom, dearly cherished.
    Give me thy hand. I had a thing to say,
    But I will fit it with some better time.
    By heaven, Hubert, I am almost ashamed
    To say what good respect I have of thee.
  • Queen Elinor. Come hither, little kinsman; hark, a word.

    King John. Come hither, Hubert. O my gentle Hubert,
    We owe thee much! within this wall of flesh
    There is a soul counts thee her creditor
    And with advantage means to pay thy love:
    And my good friend, thy voluntary oath
    Lives in this bosom, dearly cherished.
    Give me thy hand. I had a thing to say,
    But I will fit it with some better time.
    By heaven, Hubert, I am almost ashamed
    To say what good respect I have of thee.

53 III / 3
  • Good friend, thou hast no cause to say so yet,
    But thou shalt have; and cree...
  • Good friend, thou hast no cause to say so yet,
    But thou shalt have; and creep time ne'er so slow,
    Yet it shall come from me to do thee good.
    I had a thing to say, but let it go:
    The sun is in the heaven, and the proud day,
    Attended with the pleasures of the world,
    Is all too wanton and too full of gawds
    To give me audience: if the midnight bell
    Did, with his iron tongue and brazen mouth,
    Sound on into the drowsy race of night;
    If this same were a churchyard where we stand,
    And thou possessed with a thousand wrongs,
    Or if that surly spirit, melancholy,
    Had baked thy blood and made it heavy-thick,Which else runs tickling up and down the veins,
    Making that idiot, laughter, keep men's eyes
    And strain their cheeks to idle merriment,
    A passion hateful to my purposes,
    Or if that thou couldst see me without eyes,
    Hear me without thine ears, and make reply
    Without a tongue, using conceit alone,
    Without eyes, ears and harmful sound of words;
    Then, in despite of brooded watchful day,
    I would into thy bosom pour my thoughts:
    But, ah, I will not! yet I love thee well;
    And, by my troth, I think thou lovest me well.
  • Hubert de Burgh. I am much bounden to your majesty.

    King John. Good friend, thou hast no cause to say so yet,
    But thou shalt have; and creep time ne'er so slow,
    Yet it shall come from me to do thee good.
    I had a thing to say, but let it go:
    The sun is in the heaven, and the proud day,
    Attended with the pleasures of the world,
    Is all too wanton and too full of gawds
    To give me audience: if the midnight bell
    Did, with his iron tongue and brazen mouth,
    Sound on into the drowsy race of night;
    If this same were a churchyard where we stand,
    And thou possessed with a thousand wrongs,
    Or if that surly spirit, melancholy,
    Had baked thy blood and made it heavy-thick,Which else runs tickling up and down the veins,
    Making that idiot, laughter, keep men's eyes
    And strain their cheeks to idle merriment,
    A passion hateful to my purposes,
    Or if that thou couldst see me without eyes,
    Hear me without thine ears, and make reply
    Without a tongue, using conceit alone,
    Without eyes, ears and harmful sound of words;
    Then, in despite of brooded watchful day,
    I would into thy bosom pour my thoughts:
    But, ah, I will not! yet I love thee well;
    And, by my troth, I think thou lovest me well.

54 III / 3
  • Do not I know thou wouldst?
    Good Hubert, Hubert, Hubert, throw thine eye
  • Do not I know thou wouldst?
    Good Hubert, Hubert, Hubert, throw thine eye
    On yon young boy: I'll tell thee what, my friend,
    He is a very serpent in my way;
    And whereso'er this foot of mine doth tread,
    He lies before me: dost thou understand me?
    Thou art his keeper.
  • Hubert de Burgh. So well, that what you bid me undertake,
    Though that my death were adjunct to my act,
    By heaven, I would do it.

    King John. Do not I know thou wouldst?
    Good Hubert, Hubert, Hubert, throw thine eye
    On yon young boy: I'll tell thee what, my friend,
    He is a very serpent in my way;
    And whereso'er this foot of mine doth tread,
    He lies before me: dost thou understand me?
    Thou art his keeper.

55 III / 3
  • Death.
  • Death.
  • Hubert de Burgh. And I'll keep him so,
    That he shall not offend your majesty.

    King John. Death.

56 III / 3
  • A grave.
  • A grave.
  • Hubert de Burgh. My lord?

    King John. A grave.

57 III / 3
  • Enough.
    I could be merry now. Hubert, I love thee;
    Well, I'll not say wh...
  • Enough.
    I could be merry now. Hubert, I love thee;
    Well, I'll not say what I intend for thee:
    Remember. Madam, fare you well:
    I'll send those powers o'er to your majesty.
  • Hubert de Burgh. He shall not live.

    King John. Enough.
    I could be merry now. Hubert, I love thee;
    Well, I'll not say what I intend for thee:
    Remember. Madam, fare you well:
    I'll send those powers o'er to your majesty.

58 III / 3
  • For England, cousin, go:
    Hubert shall be your man, attend on you
    With al...
  • For England, cousin, go:
    Hubert shall be your man, attend on you
    With all true duty. On toward Calais, ho!
  • Queen Elinor. My blessing go with thee!

    King John. For England, cousin, go:
    Hubert shall be your man, attend on you
    With all true duty. On toward Calais, ho!

59 IV / 2
  • Here once again we sit, once again crown'd,
    And looked upon, I hope, with ch...
  • Here once again we sit, once again crown'd,
    And looked upon, I hope, with cheerful eyes.
  • Hubert de Burgh. Silence; no more: go closely in with me:
    Much danger do I undergo for thee.

    King John. Here once again we sit, once again crown'd,
    And looked upon, I hope, with cheerful eyes.

60 IV / 2
  • Some reasons of this double coronation
    I have possess'd you with and think t...
  • Some reasons of this double coronation
    I have possess'd you with and think them strong;
    And more, more strong, then lesser is my fear,
    I shall indue you with: meantime but ask
    What you would have reform'd that is not well,
    And well shall you perceive how willingly
    I will both hear and grant you your requests.
  • Salisbury. To this effect, before you were new crown'd,
    We breathed our counsel: but it pleased your highness
    To overbear it, and we are all well pleased,
    Since all and every part of what we would
    Doth make a stand at what your highness will.

    King John. Some reasons of this double coronation
    I have possess'd you with and think them strong;
    And more, more strong, then lesser is my fear,
    I shall indue you with: meantime but ask
    What you would have reform'd that is not well,
    And well shall you perceive how willingly
    I will both hear and grant you your requests.

61 IV / 2
  • Let it be so: I do commit his youth
    To your direction. Hubert, what news wit...
  • Let it be so: I do commit his youth
    To your direction. Hubert, what news with you?
  • Pembroke. Then I, as one that am the tongue of these,
    To sound the purpose of all their hearts,
    Both for myself and them, but, chief of all,
    Your safety, for the which myself and them
    Bend their best studies, heartily request
    The enfranchisement of Arthur; whose restraint
    Doth move the murmuring lips of discontent
    To break into this dangerous argument,--
    If what in rest you have in right you hold,
    Why then your fears, which, as they say, attend
    The steps of wrong, should move you to mew up
    Your tender kinsman and to choke his days
    With barbarous ignorance and deny his youth
    The rich advantage of good exercise?
    That the time's enemies may not have this
    To grace occasions, let it be our suit
    That you have bid us ask his liberty;
    Which for our goods we do no further ask
    Than whereupon our weal, on you depending,
    Counts it your weal he have his liberty.

    King John. Let it be so: I do commit his youth
    To your direction. Hubert, what news with you?

62 IV / 2
  • We cannot hold mortality's strong hand:
    Good lords, although my will to give...
  • We cannot hold mortality's strong hand:
    Good lords, although my will to give is living,
    The suit which you demand is gone and dead:
    He tells us Arthur is deceased to-night.
  • Pembroke. And when it breaks, I fear will issue thence
    The foul corruption of a sweet child's death.

    King John. We cannot hold mortality's strong hand:
    Good lords, although my will to give is living,
    The suit which you demand is gone and dead:
    He tells us Arthur is deceased to-night.

63 IV / 2
  • Why do you bend such solemn brows on me?
    Think you I bear the shears of dest...
  • Why do you bend such solemn brows on me?
    Think you I bear the shears of destiny?
    Have I commandment on the pulse of life?
  • Pembroke. Indeed we heard how near his death he was
    Before the child himself felt he was sick:
    This must be answer'd either here or hence.

    King John. Why do you bend such solemn brows on me?
    Think you I bear the shears of destiny?
    Have I commandment on the pulse of life?

64 IV / 2
  • They burn in indignation. I repent:
    There is no sure foundation set on blood...
  • They burn in indignation. I repent:
    There is no sure foundation set on blood,
    No certain life achieved by others' death.
    [Enter a Messenger]
    A fearful eye thou hast: where is that blood
    That I have seen inhabit in those cheeks?
    So foul a sky clears not without a storm:
    Pour down thy weather: how goes all in France?
  • Pembroke. Stay yet, Lord Salisbury; I'll go with thee,
    And find the inheritance of this poor child,
    His little kingdom of a forced grave.
    That blood which owed the breadth of all this isle,
    Three foot of it doth hold: bad world the while!
    This must not be thus borne: this will break out
    To all our sorrows, and ere long I doubt.

    King John. They burn in indignation. I repent:
    There is no sure foundation set on blood,
    No certain life achieved by others' death.
    [Enter a Messenger]
    A fearful eye thou hast: where is that blood
    That I have seen inhabit in those cheeks?
    So foul a sky clears not without a storm:
    Pour down thy weather: how goes all in France?

65 IV / 2
  • O, where hath our intelligence been drunk?
    Where hath it slept? Where is my...
  • O, where hath our intelligence been drunk?
    Where hath it slept? Where is my mother's care,
    That such an army could be drawn in France,
    And she not hear of it?
  • Messenger. From France to England. Never such a power
    For any foreign preparation
    Was levied in the body of a land.
    The copy of your speed is learn'd by them;
    For when you should be told they do prepare,
    The tidings come that they are all arrived.

    King John. O, where hath our intelligence been drunk?
    Where hath it slept? Where is my mother's care,
    That such an army could be drawn in France,
    And she not hear of it?

66 IV / 2
  • Withhold thy speed, dreadful occasion!
    O, make a league with me, till I have...
  • Withhold thy speed, dreadful occasion!
    O, make a league with me, till I have pleased
    My discontented peers! What! mother dead!
    How wildly then walks my estate in France!
    Under whose conduct came those powers of France
    That thou for truth givest out are landed here?
  • Messenger. My liege, her ear
    Is stopp'd with dust; the first of April died
    Your noble mother: and, as I hear, my lord,
    The Lady Constance in a frenzy died
    Three days before: but this from rumour's tongue
    I idly heard; if true or false I know not.

    King John. Withhold thy speed, dreadful occasion!
    O, make a league with me, till I have pleased
    My discontented peers! What! mother dead!
    How wildly then walks my estate in France!
    Under whose conduct came those powers of France
    That thou for truth givest out are landed here?

67 IV / 2
  • Thou hast made me giddy
    With these ill tidings.
    [Enter the BASTARD and P...
  • Thou hast made me giddy
    With these ill tidings.
    [Enter the BASTARD and PETER of Pomfret]
    Now, what says the world
    To your proceedings? do not seek to stuff
    My head with more ill news, for it is full.
  • Messenger. Under the Dauphin.

    King John. Thou hast made me giddy
    With these ill tidings.
    [Enter the BASTARD and PETER of Pomfret]
    Now, what says the world
    To your proceedings? do not seek to stuff
    My head with more ill news, for it is full.

68 IV / 2
  • Bear with me cousin, for I was amazed
    Under the tide: but now I breathe agai...
  • Bear with me cousin, for I was amazed
    Under the tide: but now I breathe again
    Aloft the flood, and can give audience
    To any tongue, speak it of what it will.
  • Philip the Bastard. But if you be afeard to hear the worst,
    Then let the worst unheard fall on your bead.

    King John. Bear with me cousin, for I was amazed
    Under the tide: but now I breathe again
    Aloft the flood, and can give audience
    To any tongue, speak it of what it will.

69 IV / 2
  • Thou idle dreamer, wherefore didst thou so?
  • Thou idle dreamer, wherefore didst thou so?
  • Philip the Bastard. How I have sped among the clergymen,
    The sums I have collected shall express.
    But as I travell'd hither through the land,
    I find the people strangely fantasied;
    Possess'd with rumours, full of idle dreams,
    Not knowing what they fear, but full of fear:
    And here a prophet, that I brought with me
    From forth the streets of Pomfret, whom I found
    With many hundreds treading on his heels;
    To whom he sung, in rude harsh-sounding rhymes,
    That, ere the next Ascension-day at noon,
    Your highness should deliver up your crown.

    King John. Thou idle dreamer, wherefore didst thou so?

70 IV / 2
  • Hubert, away with him; imprison him;
    And on that day at noon whereon he says...
  • Hubert, away with him; imprison him;
    And on that day at noon whereon he says
    I shall yield up my crown, let him be hang'd.
    Deliver him to safety; and return,
    For I must use thee.
    [Exeunt HUBERT with PETER]
    O my gentle cousin,
    Hear'st thou the news abroad, who are arrived?
  • Peter of Pomfret. Foreknowing that the truth will fall out so.

    King John. Hubert, away with him; imprison him;
    And on that day at noon whereon he says
    I shall yield up my crown, let him be hang'd.
    Deliver him to safety; and return,
    For I must use thee.
    [Exeunt HUBERT with PETER]
    O my gentle cousin,
    Hear'st thou the news abroad, who are arrived?

71 IV / 2
  • Gentle kinsman, go,
    And thrust thyself into their companies:
    I have a wa...
  • Gentle kinsman, go,
    And thrust thyself into their companies:
    I have a way to win their loves again;
    Bring them before me.
  • Philip the Bastard. The French, my lord; men's mouths are full of it:
    Besides, I met Lord Bigot and Lord Salisbury,
    With eyes as red as new-enkindled fire,
    And others more, going to seek the grave
    Of Arthur, who they say is kill'd to-night
    On your suggestion.

    King John. Gentle kinsman, go,
    And thrust thyself into their companies:
    I have a way to win their loves again;
    Bring them before me.

72 IV / 2
  • Nay, but make haste; the better foot before.
    O, let me have no subject enemi...
  • Nay, but make haste; the better foot before.
    O, let me have no subject enemies,
    When adverse foreigners affright my towns
    With dreadful pomp of stout invasion!
    Be Mercury, set feathers to thy heels,
    And fly like thought from them to me again.
  • Philip the Bastard. I will seek them out.

    King John. Nay, but make haste; the better foot before.
    O, let me have no subject enemies,
    When adverse foreigners affright my towns
    With dreadful pomp of stout invasion!
    Be Mercury, set feathers to thy heels,
    And fly like thought from them to me again.

73 IV / 2
  • Spoke like a sprightful noble gentleman.
    Go after him; for he perhaps shall...
  • Spoke like a sprightful noble gentleman.
    Go after him; for he perhaps shall need
    Some messenger betwixt me and the peers;
    And be thou he.
  • Philip the Bastard. The spirit of the time shall teach me speed.

    King John. Spoke like a sprightful noble gentleman.
    Go after him; for he perhaps shall need
    Some messenger betwixt me and the peers;
    And be thou he.

74 IV / 2
  • My mother dead!
  • My mother dead!
  • Messenger. With all my heart, my liege.

    King John. My mother dead!

75 IV / 2
  • Five moons!
  • Five moons!
  • Hubert de Burgh. My lord, they say five moons were seen to-night;
    Four fixed, and the fifth did whirl about
    The other four in wondrous motion.

    King John. Five moons!

76 IV / 2
  • Why seek'st thou to possess me with these fears?
    Why urgest thou so oft youn...
  • Why seek'st thou to possess me with these fears?
    Why urgest thou so oft young Arthur's death?
    Thy hand hath murder'd him: I had a mighty cause
    To wish him dead, but thou hadst none to kill him.
  • Hubert de Burgh. Old men and beldams in the streets
    Do prophesy upon it dangerously:
    Young Arthur's death is common in their mouths:
    And when they talk of him, they shake their heads
    And whisper one another in the ear;
    And he that speaks doth gripe the hearer's wrist,
    Whilst he that hears makes fearful action,
    With wrinkled brows, with nods, with rolling eyes.
    I saw a smith stand with his hammer, thus,
    The whilst his iron did on the anvil cool,
    With open mouth swallowing a tailor's news;
    Who, with his shears and measure in his hand,
    Standing on slippers, which his nimble haste
    Had falsely thrust upon contrary feet,
    Told of a many thousand warlike French
    That were embattailed and rank'd in Kent:
    Another lean unwash'd artificer
    Cuts off his tale and talks of Arthur's death.

    King John. Why seek'st thou to possess me with these fears?
    Why urgest thou so oft young Arthur's death?
    Thy hand hath murder'd him: I had a mighty cause
    To wish him dead, but thou hadst none to kill him.

77 IV / 2
  • It is the curse of kings to be attended
    By slaves that take their humours fo...
  • It is the curse of kings to be attended
    By slaves that take their humours for a warrant
    To break within the bloody house of life,
    And on the winking of authority
    To understand a law, to know the meaning
    Of dangerous majesty, when perchance it frowns
    More upon humour than advised respect.
  • Hubert de Burgh. No had, my lord! why, did you not provoke me?

    King John. It is the curse of kings to be attended
    By slaves that take their humours for a warrant
    To break within the bloody house of life,
    And on the winking of authority
    To understand a law, to know the meaning
    Of dangerous majesty, when perchance it frowns
    More upon humour than advised respect.

78 IV / 2
  • O, when the last account 'twixt heaven and earth
    Is to be made, then shall t...
  • O, when the last account 'twixt heaven and earth
    Is to be made, then shall this hand and seal
    Witness against us to damnation!
    How oft the sight of means to do ill deeds
    Make deeds ill done! Hadst not thou been by,
    A fellow by the hand of nature mark'd,
    Quoted and sign'd to do a deed of shame,
    This murder had not come into my mind:
    But taking note of thy abhorr'd aspect,
    Finding thee fit for bloody villany,
    Apt, liable to be employ'd in danger,
    I faintly broke with thee of Arthur's death;
    And thou, to be endeared to a king,
    Made it no conscience to destroy a prince.
  • Hubert de Burgh. Here is your hand and seal for what I did.

    King John. O, when the last account 'twixt heaven and earth
    Is to be made, then shall this hand and seal
    Witness against us to damnation!
    How oft the sight of means to do ill deeds
    Make deeds ill done! Hadst not thou been by,
    A fellow by the hand of nature mark'd,
    Quoted and sign'd to do a deed of shame,
    This murder had not come into my mind:
    But taking note of thy abhorr'd aspect,
    Finding thee fit for bloody villany,
    Apt, liable to be employ'd in danger,
    I faintly broke with thee of Arthur's death;
    And thou, to be endeared to a king,
    Made it no conscience to destroy a prince.

79 IV / 2
  • Hadst thou but shook thy head or made a pause
    When I spake darkly what I pur...
  • Hadst thou but shook thy head or made a pause
    When I spake darkly what I purposed,
    Or turn'd an eye of doubt upon my face,
    As bid me tell my tale in express words,
    Deep shame had struck me dumb, made me break off,
    And those thy fears might have wrought fears in me:
    But thou didst understand me by my signs
    And didst in signs again parley with sin;
    Yea, without stop, didst let thy heart consent,
    And consequently thy rude hand to act
    The deed, which both our tongues held vile to name.
    Out of my sight, and never see me more!
    My nobles leave me; and my state is braved,
    Even at my gates, with ranks of foreign powers:
    Nay, in the body of this fleshly land,
    This kingdom, this confine of blood and breath,
    Hostility and civil tumult reigns
    Between my conscience and my cousin's death.
  • Hubert de Burgh. My lord--

    King John. Hadst thou but shook thy head or made a pause
    When I spake darkly what I purposed,
    Or turn'd an eye of doubt upon my face,
    As bid me tell my tale in express words,
    Deep shame had struck me dumb, made me break off,
    And those thy fears might have wrought fears in me:
    But thou didst understand me by my signs
    And didst in signs again parley with sin;
    Yea, without stop, didst let thy heart consent,
    And consequently thy rude hand to act
    The deed, which both our tongues held vile to name.
    Out of my sight, and never see me more!
    My nobles leave me; and my state is braved,
    Even at my gates, with ranks of foreign powers:
    Nay, in the body of this fleshly land,
    This kingdom, this confine of blood and breath,
    Hostility and civil tumult reigns
    Between my conscience and my cousin's death.

80 IV / 2
  • Doth Arthur live? O, haste thee to the peers,
    Throw this report on their inc...
  • Doth Arthur live? O, haste thee to the peers,
    Throw this report on their incensed rage,
    And make them tame to their obedience!
    Forgive the comment that my passion made
    Upon thy feature; for my rage was blind,
    And foul imaginary eyes of blood
    Presented thee more hideous than thou art.
    O, answer not, but to my closet bring
    The angry lords with all expedient haste.
    I conjure thee but slowly; run more fast.
  • Hubert de Burgh. Arm you against your other enemies,
    I'll make a peace between your soul and you.
    Young Arthur is alive: this hand of mine
    Is yet a maiden and an innocent hand,
    Not painted with the crimson spots of blood.
    Within this bosom never enter'd yet
    The dreadful motion of a murderous thought;
    And you have slander'd nature in my form,
    Which, howsoever rude exteriorly,
    Is yet the cover of a fairer mind
    Than to be butcher of an innocent child.

    King John. Doth Arthur live? O, haste thee to the peers,
    Throw this report on their incensed rage,
    And make them tame to their obedience!
    Forgive the comment that my passion made
    Upon thy feature; for my rage was blind,
    And foul imaginary eyes of blood
    Presented thee more hideous than thou art.
    O, answer not, but to my closet bring
    The angry lords with all expedient haste.
    I conjure thee but slowly; run more fast.

81 V / 1
  • Thus have I yielded up into your hand
    The circle of my glory.
  • Thus have I yielded up into your hand
    The circle of my glory.
  • Philip the Bastard. Go, bear him in thine arms.
    I am amazed, methinks, and lose my way
    Among the thorns and dangers of this world.
    How easy dost thou take all England up!
    From forth this morsel of dead royalty,
    The life, the right and truth of all this realm
    Is fled to heaven; and England now is left
    To tug and scamble and to part by the teeth
    The unowed interest of proud-swelling state.
    Now for the bare-pick'd bone of majesty
    Doth dogged war bristle his angry crest
    And snarleth in the gentle eyes of peace:
    Now powers from home and discontents at home
    Meet in one line; and vast confusion waits,
    As doth a raven on a sick-fall'n beast,
    The imminent decay of wrested pomp.
    Now happy he whose cloak and cincture can
    Hold out this tempest. Bear away that child
    And follow me with speed: I'll to the king:
    A thousand businesses are brief in hand,
    And heaven itself doth frown upon the land.

    King John. Thus have I yielded up into your hand
    The circle of my glory.

82 V / 1
  • Now keep your holy word: go meet the French,
    And from his holiness use all y...
  • Now keep your holy word: go meet the French,
    And from his holiness use all your power
    To stop their marches 'fore we are inflamed.
    Our discontented counties do revolt;
    Our people quarrel with obedience,
    Swearing allegiance and the love of soul
    To stranger blood, to foreign royalty.
    This inundation of mistemper'd humour
    Rests by you only to be qualified:
    Then pause not; for the present time's so sick,
    That present medicine must be minister'd,
    Or overthrow incurable ensues.
  • Cardinal Pandulph. Take again
    From this my hand, as holding of the pope
    Your sovereign greatness and authority.

    King John. Now keep your holy word: go meet the French,
    And from his holiness use all your power
    To stop their marches 'fore we are inflamed.
    Our discontented counties do revolt;
    Our people quarrel with obedience,
    Swearing allegiance and the love of soul
    To stranger blood, to foreign royalty.
    This inundation of mistemper'd humour
    Rests by you only to be qualified:
    Then pause not; for the present time's so sick,
    That present medicine must be minister'd,
    Or overthrow incurable ensues.

83 V / 1
  • Is this Ascension-day? Did not the prophet
    Say that before Ascension-day at...
  • Is this Ascension-day? Did not the prophet
    Say that before Ascension-day at noon
    My crown I should give off? Even so I have:
    I did suppose it should be on constraint:
    But, heaven be thank'd, it is but voluntary.
  • Cardinal Pandulph. It was my breath that blew this tempest up,
    Upon your stubborn usage of the pope;
    But since you are a gentle convertite,
    My tongue shall hush again this storm of war
    And make fair weather in your blustering land.
    On this Ascension-day, remember well,
    Upon your oath of service to the pope,
    Go I to make the French lay down their arms.

    King John. Is this Ascension-day? Did not the prophet
    Say that before Ascension-day at noon
    My crown I should give off? Even so I have:
    I did suppose it should be on constraint:
    But, heaven be thank'd, it is but voluntary.

84 V / 1
  • Would not my lords return to me again,
    After they heard young Arthur was ali...
  • Would not my lords return to me again,
    After they heard young Arthur was alive?
  • Philip the Bastard. All Kent hath yielded; nothing there holds out
    But Dover castle: London hath received,
    Like a kind host, the Dauphin and his powers:
    Your nobles will not hear you, but are gone
    To offer service to your enemy,
    And wild amazement hurries up and down
    The little number of your doubtful friends.

    King John. Would not my lords return to me again,
    After they heard young Arthur was alive?

85 V / 1
  • That villain Hubert told me he did live.
  • That villain Hubert told me he did live.
  • Philip the Bastard. They found him dead and cast into the streets,
    An empty casket, where the jewel of life
    By some damn'd hand was robb'd and ta'en away.

    King John. That villain Hubert told me he did live.

86 V / 1
  • The legate of the pope hath been with me,
    And I have made a happy peace with...
  • The legate of the pope hath been with me,
    And I have made a happy peace with him;
    And he hath promised to dismiss the powers
    Led by the Dauphin.
  • Philip the Bastard. So, on my soul, he did, for aught he knew.
    But wherefore do you droop? why look you sad?
    Be great in act, as you have been in thought;
    Let not the world see fear and sad distrust
    Govern the motion of a kingly eye:
    Be stirring as the time; be fire with fire;
    Threaten the threatener and outface the brow
    Of bragging horror: so shall inferior eyes,
    That borrow their behaviors from the great,
    Grow great by your example and put on
    The dauntless spirit of resolution.
    Away, and glister like the god of war,
    When he intendeth to become the field:
    Show boldness and aspiring confidence.
    What, shall they seek the lion in his den,
    And fright him there? and make him tremble there?
    O, let it not be said: forage, and run
    To meet displeasure farther from the doors,
    And grapple with him ere he comes so nigh.

    King John. The legate of the pope hath been with me,
    And I have made a happy peace with him;
    And he hath promised to dismiss the powers
    Led by the Dauphin.

87 V / 1
  • Have thou the ordering of this present time.
  • Have thou the ordering of this present time.
  • Philip the Bastard. O inglorious league!
    Shall we, upon the footing of our land,
    Send fair-play orders and make compromise,
    Insinuation, parley and base truce
    To arms invasive? shall a beardless boy,
    A cocker'd silken wanton, brave our fields,
    And flesh his spirit in a warlike soil,
    Mocking the air with colours idly spread,
    And find no cheque? Let us, my liege, to arms:
    Perchance the cardinal cannot make your peace;
    Or if he do, let it at least be said
    They saw we had a purpose of defence.

    King John. Have thou the ordering of this present time.

88 V / 3
  • How goes the day with us? O, tell me, Hubert.
  • How goes the day with us? O, tell me, Hubert.
  • Philip the Bastard. And thou shalt find it, Dauphin, do not doubt.

    King John. How goes the day with us? O, tell me, Hubert.

89 V / 3
  • This fever, that hath troubled me so long,
    Lies heavy on me; O, my heart is...
  • This fever, that hath troubled me so long,
    Lies heavy on me; O, my heart is sick!
  • Hubert de Burgh. Badly, I fear. How fares your majesty?

    King John. This fever, that hath troubled me so long,
    Lies heavy on me; O, my heart is sick!

90 V / 3
  • Tell him, toward Swinstead, to the abbey there.
  • Tell him, toward Swinstead, to the abbey there.
  • Messenger. My lord, your valiant kinsman, Faulconbridge,
    Desires your majesty to leave the field
    And send him word by me which way you go.

    King John. Tell him, toward Swinstead, to the abbey there.

91 V / 3
  • Ay me! this tyrant fever burns me up,
    And will not let me welcome this good...
  • Ay me! this tyrant fever burns me up,
    And will not let me welcome this good news.
    Set on toward Swinstead: to my litter straight;
    Weakness possesseth me, and I am faint.
  • Messenger. Be of good comfort; for the great supply
    That was expected by the Dauphin here,
    Are wreck'd three nights ago on Goodwin Sands.
    This news was brought to Richard but even now:
    The French fight coldly, and retire themselves.

    King John. Ay me! this tyrant fever burns me up,
    And will not let me welcome this good news.
    Set on toward Swinstead: to my litter straight;
    Weakness possesseth me, and I am faint.

92 V / 7
  • Ay, marry, now my soul hath elbow-room;
    It would not out at windows nor at d...
  • Ay, marry, now my soul hath elbow-room;
    It would not out at windows nor at doors.
    There is so hot a summer in my bosom,
    That all my bowels crumble up to dust:
    I am a scribbled form, drawn with a pen
    Upon a parchment, and against this fire
    Do I shrink up.
  • Salisbury. Be of good comfort, prince; for you are born
    To set a form upon that indigest
    Which he hath left so shapeless and so rude.

    King John. Ay, marry, now my soul hath elbow-room;
    It would not out at windows nor at doors.
    There is so hot a summer in my bosom,
    That all my bowels crumble up to dust:
    I am a scribbled form, drawn with a pen
    Upon a parchment, and against this fire
    Do I shrink up.

93 V / 7
  • Poison'd,--ill fare--dead, forsook, cast off:
    And none of you will bid the w...
  • Poison'd,--ill fare--dead, forsook, cast off:
    And none of you will bid the winter come
    To thrust his icy fingers in my maw,
    Nor let my kingdom's rivers take their course
    Through my burn'd bosom, nor entreat the north
    To make his bleak winds kiss my parched lips
    And comfort me with cold. I do not ask you much,
    I beg cold comfort; and you are so strait
    And so ingrateful, you deny me that.
  • Prince Henry. How fares your majesty?

    King John. Poison'd,--ill fare--dead, forsook, cast off:
    And none of you will bid the winter come
    To thrust his icy fingers in my maw,
    Nor let my kingdom's rivers take their course
    Through my burn'd bosom, nor entreat the north
    To make his bleak winds kiss my parched lips
    And comfort me with cold. I do not ask you much,
    I beg cold comfort; and you are so strait
    And so ingrateful, you deny me that.

94 V / 7
  • The salt in them is hot.
    Within me is a hell; and there the poison
    Is as...
  • The salt in them is hot.
    Within me is a hell; and there the poison
    Is as a fiend confined to tyrannize
    On unreprievable condemned blood.
  • Prince Henry. O that there were some virtue in my tears,
    That might relieve you!

    King John. The salt in them is hot.
    Within me is a hell; and there the poison
    Is as a fiend confined to tyrannize
    On unreprievable condemned blood.

95 V / 7
  • O cousin, thou art come to set mine eye:
    The tackle of my heart is crack'd a...
  • O cousin, thou art come to set mine eye:
    The tackle of my heart is crack'd and burn'd,
    And all the shrouds wherewith my life should sail
    Are turned to one thread, one little hair:
    My heart hath one poor string to stay it by,
    Which holds but till thy news be uttered;
    And then all this thou seest is but a clod
    And module of confounded royalty.
  • Philip the Bastard. O, I am scalded with my violent motion,
    And spleen of speed to see your majesty!

    King John. O cousin, thou art come to set mine eye:
    The tackle of my heart is crack'd and burn'd,
    And all the shrouds wherewith my life should sail
    Are turned to one thread, one little hair:
    My heart hath one poor string to stay it by,
    Which holds but till thy news be uttered;
    And then all this thou seest is but a clod
    And module of confounded royalty.

© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.