Speeches (Lines) for Titus Lartius in "The Tragedy of Coriolanus"

Total: 23
print
# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 1
  • No, Caius CORIOLANUS;
    I'll lean upon one crutch and fight with t'other,
    ...
  • No, Caius CORIOLANUS;
    I'll lean upon one crutch and fight with t'other,
    Ere stay behind this business.
  • Coriolanus. Sir, it is;
    And I am constant. Titus TITUS, thou
    Shalt see me once more strike at Tullus' face.
    What, art thou stiff? stand'st out?

    Titus Lartius. No, Caius CORIOLANUS;
    I'll lean upon one crutch and fight with t'other,
    Ere stay behind this business.

2 I / 1
  • [To COMINIUS] Lead you on.
    [To CORIOLANUS] Follow Cominius; we must follow y...
  • [To COMINIUS] Lead you on.
    [To CORIOLANUS] Follow Cominius; we must follow you;]
    Right worthy you priority.
  • First Senator. Your company to the Capitol; where, I know,
    Our greatest friends attend us.

    Titus Lartius. [To COMINIUS] Lead you on.
    [To CORIOLANUS] Follow Cominius; we must follow you;]
    Right worthy you priority.

3 I / 4
  • My horse to yours, no.
  • My horse to yours, no.
  • Coriolanus. Yonder comes news. A wager they have met.

    Titus Lartius. My horse to yours, no.

4 I / 4
  • Agreed.
  • Agreed.
  • Coriolanus. 'Tis done.

    Titus Lartius. Agreed.

5 I / 4
  • So, the good horse is mine.
  • So, the good horse is mine.
  • Messenger. They lie in view; but have not spoke as yet.

    Titus Lartius. So, the good horse is mine.

6 I / 4
  • No, I'll nor sell nor give him: lend you him I will
    For half a hundred years...
  • No, I'll nor sell nor give him: lend you him I will
    For half a hundred years. Summon the town.
  • Coriolanus. I'll buy him of you.

    Titus Lartius. No, I'll nor sell nor give him: lend you him I will
    For half a hundred years. Summon the town.

7 I / 4
  • Their noise be our instruction. Ladders, ho!
  • Their noise be our instruction. Ladders, ho!
  • Coriolanus. O, they are at it!

    Titus Lartius. Their noise be our instruction. Ladders, ho!

8 I / 4
  • What is become of CORIOLANUS?
  • What is become of CORIOLANUS?
  • All. To the pot, I warrant him.

    Titus Lartius. What is become of CORIOLANUS?

9 I / 4
  • O noble fellow!
    Who sensibly outdares his senseless sword,
    And, when it...
  • O noble fellow!
    Who sensibly outdares his senseless sword,
    And, when it bows, stands up. Thou art left, CORIOLANUS:
    A carbuncle entire, as big as thou art,
    Were not so rich a jewel. Thou wast a soldier
    Even to Cato's wish, not fierce and terrible
    Only in strokes; but, with thy grim looks and
    The thunder-like percussion of thy sounds,
    Thou madst thine enemies shake, as if the world
    Were feverous and did tremble.
  • First Soldier. Following the fliers at the very heels,
    With them he enters; who, upon the sudden,
    Clapp'd to their gates: he is himself alone,
    To answer all the city.

    Titus Lartius. O noble fellow!
    Who sensibly outdares his senseless sword,
    And, when it bows, stands up. Thou art left, CORIOLANUS:
    A carbuncle entire, as big as thou art,
    Were not so rich a jewel. Thou wast a soldier
    Even to Cato's wish, not fierce and terrible
    Only in strokes; but, with thy grim looks and
    The thunder-like percussion of thy sounds,
    Thou madst thine enemies shake, as if the world
    Were feverous and did tremble.

10 I / 4
  • O,'tis CORIOLANUS!
    Let's fetch him off, or make remain alike.
  • O,'tis CORIOLANUS!
    Let's fetch him off, or make remain alike.
  • First Soldier. Look, sir.

    Titus Lartius. O,'tis CORIOLANUS!
    Let's fetch him off, or make remain alike.

11 I / 5
  • Worthy sir, thou bleed'st;
    Thy exercise hath been too violent for
    A seco...
  • Worthy sir, thou bleed'st;
    Thy exercise hath been too violent for
    A second course of fight.
  • Coriolanus. See here these movers that do prize their hours
    At a crack'd drachm! Cushions, leaden spoons,
    Irons of a doit, doublets that hangmen would
    Bury with those that wore them, these base slaves,
    Ere yet the fight be done, pack up: down with them!
    And hark, what noise the general makes! To him!
    There is the man of my soul's hate, Aufidius,
    Piercing our Romans: then, valiant Titus, take
    Convenient numbers to make good the city;
    Whilst I, with those that have the spirit, will haste
    To help Cominius.

    Titus Lartius. Worthy sir, thou bleed'st;
    Thy exercise hath been too violent for
    A second course of fight.

12 I / 5
  • Now the fair goddess, Fortune,
    Fall deep in love with thee; and her great ch...
  • Now the fair goddess, Fortune,
    Fall deep in love with thee; and her great charms
    Misguide thy opposers' swords! Bold gentleman,
    Prosperity be thy page!
  • Coriolanus. Sir, praise me not;
    My work hath yet not warm'd me: fare you well:
    The blood I drop is rather physical
    Than dangerous to me: to Aufidius thus
    I will appear, and fight.

    Titus Lartius. Now the fair goddess, Fortune,
    Fall deep in love with thee; and her great charms
    Misguide thy opposers' swords! Bold gentleman,
    Prosperity be thy page!

13 I / 5
  • Thou worthiest CORIOLANUS!
    [Exit CORIOLANUS]
    Go, sound thy trumpet in th...
  • Thou worthiest CORIOLANUS!
    [Exit CORIOLANUS]
    Go, sound thy trumpet in the market-place;
    Call thither all the officers o' the town,
    Where they shall know our mind: away!
  • Coriolanus. Thy friend no less
    Than those she placeth highest! So, farewell.

    Titus Lartius. Thou worthiest CORIOLANUS!
    [Exit CORIOLANUS]
    Go, sound thy trumpet in the market-place;
    Call thither all the officers o' the town,
    Where they shall know our mind: away!

14 I / 7
  • So, let the ports be guarded: keep your duties,
    As I have set them down. If...
  • So, let the ports be guarded: keep your duties,
    As I have set them down. If I do send, dispatch
    Those centuries to our aid: the rest will serve
    For a short holding: if we lose the field,
    We cannot keep the town.
  • Cominius. March on, my fellows:
    Make good this ostentation, and you shall
    Divide in all with us.

    Titus Lartius. So, let the ports be guarded: keep your duties,
    As I have set them down. If I do send, dispatch
    Those centuries to our aid: the rest will serve
    For a short holding: if we lose the field,
    We cannot keep the town.

15 I / 7
  • Hence, and shut your gates upon's.
    Our guider, come; to the Roman camp condu...
  • Hence, and shut your gates upon's.
    Our guider, come; to the Roman camp conduct us.
  • Lieutenant. Fear not our care, sir.

    Titus Lartius. Hence, and shut your gates upon's.
    Our guider, come; to the Roman camp conduct us.

16 I / 9
  • O general,
    Here is the steed, we the caparison:
    Hadst thou beheld--
  • O general,
    Here is the steed, we the caparison:
    Hadst thou beheld--
  • Cominius. If I should tell thee o'er this thy day's work,
    Thou'ldst not believe thy deeds: but I'll report it
    Where senators shall mingle tears with smiles,
    Where great patricians shall attend and shrug,
    I' the end admire, where ladies shall be frighted,
    And, gladly quaked, hear more; where the
    dull tribunes,
    That, with the fusty plebeians, hate thine honours,
    Shall say against their hearts 'We thank the gods
    Our Rome hath such a soldier.'
    Yet camest thou to a morsel of this feast,
    Having fully dined before.
    [Enter TITUS LARTIUS, with his power,]
    from the pursuit]

    Titus Lartius. O general,
    Here is the steed, we the caparison:
    Hadst thou beheld--

17 I / 9
  • I shall, my lord.
  • I shall, my lord.
  • Cominius. So, to our tent;
    Where, ere we do repose us, we will write
    To Rome of our success. You, Titus TITUS,
    Must to Corioli back: send us to Rome
    The best, with whom we may articulate,
    For their own good and ours.

    Titus Lartius. I shall, my lord.

18 I / 9
  • CORIOLANUS, his name?
  • CORIOLANUS, his name?
  • Cominius. O, well begg'd!
    Were he the butcher of my son, he should
    Be free as is the wind. Deliver him, Titus.

    Titus Lartius. CORIOLANUS, his name?

19 III / 1
  • He had, my lord; and that it was which caused
    Our swifter composition.
  • He had, my lord; and that it was which caused
    Our swifter composition.
  • Coriolanus. Tullus Aufidius then had made new head?

    Titus Lartius. He had, my lord; and that it was which caused
    Our swifter composition.

20 III / 1
  • On safe-guard he came to me; and did curse
    Against the Volsces, for they had...
  • On safe-guard he came to me; and did curse
    Against the Volsces, for they had so vilely
    Yielded the town: he is retired to Antium.
  • Coriolanus. Saw you Aufidius?

    Titus Lartius. On safe-guard he came to me; and did curse
    Against the Volsces, for they had so vilely
    Yielded the town: he is retired to Antium.

21 III / 1
  • He did, my lord.
  • He did, my lord.
  • Coriolanus. Spoke he of me?

    Titus Lartius. He did, my lord.

22 III / 1
  • How often he had met you, sword to sword;
    That of all things upon the earth...
  • How often he had met you, sword to sword;
    That of all things upon the earth he hated
    Your person most, that he would pawn his fortunes
    To hopeless restitution, so he might
    Be call'd your vanquisher.
  • Coriolanus. How? what?

    Titus Lartius. How often he had met you, sword to sword;
    That of all things upon the earth he hated
    Your person most, that he would pawn his fortunes
    To hopeless restitution, so he might
    Be call'd your vanquisher.

23 III / 1
  • At Antium.
  • At Antium.
  • Coriolanus. At Antium lives he?

    Titus Lartius. At Antium.

© Copyright 2017-2021 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.

shakespeare_network

© Copyright 2017-2021 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.