Speeches (Lines) for Ligarius in "The Tragedy of Julius Caesar"

Total: 5
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 II / 1
  • Vouchsafe good morrow from a feeble tongue.
  • Vouchsafe good morrow from a feeble tongue.
  • Brutus. Caius Ligarius, that Metellus spake of.
    Boy, stand aside. Caius Ligarius! how?

    Ligarius. Vouchsafe good morrow from a feeble tongue.

2 II / 1
  • I am not sick, if Brutus have in hand
    Any exploit worthy the name of honour....
  • I am not sick, if Brutus have in hand
    Any exploit worthy the name of honour.
  • Brutus. O, what a time have you chose out, brave Caius,
    To wear a kerchief! Would you were not sick!

    Ligarius. I am not sick, if Brutus have in hand
    Any exploit worthy the name of honour.

3 II / 1
  • By all the gods that Romans bow before,
    I here discard my sickness! Soul of...
  • By all the gods that Romans bow before,
    I here discard my sickness! Soul of Rome!
    Brave son, derived from honourable loins!
    Thou, like an exorcist, hast conjured up
    My mortified spirit. Now bid me run,
    And I will strive with things impossible;
    Yea, get the better of them. What's to do?
  • Brutus. Such an exploit have I in hand, Ligarius,
    Had you a healthful ear to hear of it.

    Ligarius. By all the gods that Romans bow before,
    I here discard my sickness! Soul of Rome!
    Brave son, derived from honourable loins!
    Thou, like an exorcist, hast conjured up
    My mortified spirit. Now bid me run,
    And I will strive with things impossible;
    Yea, get the better of them. What's to do?

4 II / 1
  • But are not some whole that we must make sick?
  • But are not some whole that we must make sick?
  • Brutus. A piece of work that will make sick men whole.

    Ligarius. But are not some whole that we must make sick?

5 II / 1
  • Set on your foot,
    And with a heart new-fired I follow you,
    To do I know...
  • Set on your foot,
    And with a heart new-fired I follow you,
    To do I know not what: but it sufficeth
    That Brutus leads me on.
  • Brutus. That must we also. What it is, my Caius,
    I shall unfold to thee, as we are going
    To whom it must be done.

    Ligarius. Set on your foot,
    And with a heart new-fired I follow you,
    To do I know not what: but it sufficeth
    That Brutus leads me on.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.