Speeches (Lines) for Longaville in "Love's Labour's Lost"

Total: 40
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# Act, Scene, Line Speech text
1 I, 1, 26
  • I am resolved; 'tis but a three years' fast:
    The mind shall banquet, though...
  • I am resolved; 'tis but a three years' fast:
    The mind shall banquet, though the body pine:
    Fat paunches have lean pates, and dainty bits
    Make rich the ribs, but bankrupt quite the wits.
  • Ferdinand. Let fame, that all hunt after in their lives,
    Live register'd upon our brazen tombs
    And then grace us in the disgrace of death;
    When, spite of cormorant devouring Time,
    The endeavor of this present breath may buy
    That honour which shall bate his scythe's keen edge
    And make us heirs of all eternity.
    Therefore, brave conquerors,--for so you are,
    That war against your own affections
    And the huge army of the world's desires,--
    Our late edict shall strongly stand in force:
    Navarre shall be the wonder of the world;
    Our court shall be a little Academe,
    Still and contemplative in living art.
    You three, Biron, Dumain, and Longaville,
    Have sworn for three years' term to live with me
    My fellow-scholars, and to keep those statutes
    That are recorded in this schedule here:
    Your oaths are pass'd; and now subscribe your names,
    That his own hand may strike his honour down
    That violates the smallest branch herein:
    If you are arm'd to do as sworn to do,
    Subscribe to your deep oaths, and keep it too.

    Longaville. I am resolved; 'tis but a three years' fast:
    The mind shall banquet, though the body pine:
    Fat paunches have lean pates, and dainty bits
    Make rich the ribs, but bankrupt quite the wits.

2 I, 1, 55
  • You swore to that, Biron, and to the rest.
  • You swore to that, Biron, and to the rest.
  • Biron. Let me say no, my liege, an if you please:
    I only swore to study with your grace
    And stay here in your court for three years' space.

    Longaville. You swore to that, Biron, and to the rest.

3 I, 1, 98
  • He weeds the corn and still lets grow the weeding.
  • He weeds the corn and still lets grow the weeding.
  • Dumain. Proceeded well, to stop all good proceeding!

    Longaville. He weeds the corn and still lets grow the weeding.

4 I, 1, 125
  • Four days ago.
  • Four days ago.
  • Biron. [Reads] 'Item, That no woman shall come within a
    mile of my court:' Hath this been proclaimed?

    Longaville. Four days ago.

5 I, 1, 129
  • Marry, that did I.
  • Marry, that did I.
  • Biron. Let's see the penalty.
    [Reads]
    'On pain of losing her tongue.' Who devised this penalty?

    Longaville. Marry, that did I.

6 I, 1, 131
  • To fright them hence with that dread penalty.
  • To fright them hence with that dread penalty.
  • Biron. Sweet lord, and why?

    Longaville. To fright them hence with that dread penalty.

7 I, 1, 184
  • Costard the swain and he shall be our sport;
    And so to study, three years is...
  • Costard the swain and he shall be our sport;
    And so to study, three years is but short.
  • Biron. Armado is a most illustrious wight,
    A man of fire-new words, fashion's own knight.

    Longaville. Costard the swain and he shall be our sport;
    And so to study, three years is but short.

8 I, 1, 198
  • A high hope for a low heaven: God grant us patience!
  • A high hope for a low heaven: God grant us patience!
  • Biron. How low soever the matter, I hope in God for high words.

    Longaville. A high hope for a low heaven: God grant us patience!

9 I, 1, 200
  • To hear meekly, sir, and to laugh moderately; or to
    forbear both.
  • To hear meekly, sir, and to laugh moderately; or to
    forbear both.
  • Biron. To hear? or forbear laughing?

    Longaville. To hear meekly, sir, and to laugh moderately; or to
    forbear both.

10 II, 1, 690
  • I beseech you a word: what is she in the white?
  • I beseech you a word: what is she in the white?
  • (stage directions). [Exit]

    Longaville. I beseech you a word: what is she in the white?

11 II, 1, 692
  • Perchance light in the light. I desire her name.
  • Perchance light in the light. I desire her name.
  • Boyet. A woman sometimes, an you saw her in the light.

    Longaville. Perchance light in the light. I desire her name.

12 II, 1, 694
  • Pray you, sir, whose daughter?
  • Pray you, sir, whose daughter?
  • Boyet. She hath but one for herself; to desire that were a shame.

    Longaville. Pray you, sir, whose daughter?

13 II, 1, 696
  • God's blessing on your beard!
  • God's blessing on your beard!
  • Boyet. Her mother's, I have heard.

    Longaville. God's blessing on your beard!

14 II, 1, 699
  • Nay, my choler is ended.
    She is a most sweet lady.
  • Nay, my choler is ended.
    She is a most sweet lady.
  • Boyet. Good sir, be not offended.
    She is an heir of Falconbridge.

    Longaville. Nay, my choler is ended.
    She is a most sweet lady.

15 IV, 3, 1368
  • Ay me, I am forsworn!
  • Ay me, I am forsworn!
  • (stage directions). [Enter LONGAVILLE, with a paper]

    Longaville. Ay me, I am forsworn!

16 IV, 3, 1372
  • Am I the first that have been perjured so?
  • Am I the first that have been perjured so?
  • Biron. One drunkard loves another of the name.

    Longaville. Am I the first that have been perjured so?

17 IV, 3, 1376
  • I fear these stubborn lines lack power to move:
    O sweet Maria, empress of my...
  • I fear these stubborn lines lack power to move:
    O sweet Maria, empress of my love!
    These numbers will I tear, and write in prose.
  • Biron. I could put thee in comfort. Not by two that I know:
    Thou makest the triumviry, the corner-cap of society,
    The shape of Love's Tyburn that hangs up simplicity.

    Longaville. I fear these stubborn lines lack power to move:
    O sweet Maria, empress of my love!
    These numbers will I tear, and write in prose.

18 IV, 3, 1381
  • This same shall go.
    [Reads]
    Did not the heavenly rhetoric of thine eye,...
  • This same shall go.
    [Reads]
    Did not the heavenly rhetoric of thine eye,
    'Gainst whom the world cannot hold argument,
    Persuade my heart to this false perjury?
    Vows for thee broke deserve not punishment.
    A woman I forswore; but I will prove,
    Thou being a goddess, I forswore not thee:
    My vow was earthly, thou a heavenly love;
    Thy grace being gain'd cures all disgrace in me.
    Vows are but breath, and breath a vapour is:
    Then thou, fair sun, which on my earth dost shine,
    Exhalest this vapour-vow; in thee it is:
    If broken then, it is no fault of mine:
    If by me broke, what fool is not so wise
    To lose an oath to win a paradise?
  • Biron. O, rhymes are guards on wanton Cupid's hose:
    Disfigure not his slop.

    Longaville. This same shall go.
    [Reads]
    Did not the heavenly rhetoric of thine eye,
    'Gainst whom the world cannot hold argument,
    Persuade my heart to this false perjury?
    Vows for thee broke deserve not punishment.
    A woman I forswore; but I will prove,
    Thou being a goddess, I forswore not thee:
    My vow was earthly, thou a heavenly love;
    Thy grace being gain'd cures all disgrace in me.
    Vows are but breath, and breath a vapour is:
    Then thou, fair sun, which on my earth dost shine,
    Exhalest this vapour-vow; in thee it is:
    If broken then, it is no fault of mine:
    If by me broke, what fool is not so wise
    To lose an oath to win a paradise?

19 IV, 3, 1400
  • By whom shall I send this?--Company! stay.
  • By whom shall I send this?--Company! stay.
  • Biron. This is the liver-vein, which makes flesh a deity,
    A green goose a goddess: pure, pure idolatry.
    God amend us, God amend! we are much out o' the way.

    Longaville. By whom shall I send this?--Company! stay.

20 IV, 3, 1420
  • And I had mine!
  • And I had mine!
  • Dumain. O that I had my wish!

    Longaville. And I had mine!

21 IV, 3, 1456
  • [Advancing] Dumain, thy love is far from charity.
    You may look pale, but I s...
  • [Advancing] Dumain, thy love is far from charity.
    You may look pale, but I should blush, I know,
    To be o'erheard and taken napping so.
  • Dumain. [Reads]
    On a day--alack the day!--
    Love, whose month is ever May,
    Spied a blossom passing fair
    Playing in the wanton air:
    Through the velvet leaves the wind,
    All unseen, can passage find;
    That the lover, sick to death,
    Wish himself the heaven's breath.
    Air, quoth he, thy cheeks may blow;
    Air, would I might triumph so!
    But, alack, my hand is sworn
    Ne'er to pluck thee from thy thorn;
    Vow, alack, for youth unmeet,
    Youth so apt to pluck a sweet!
    Do not call it sin in me,
    That I am forsworn for thee;
    Thou for whom Jove would swear
    Juno but an Ethiope were;
    And deny himself for Jove,
    Turning mortal for thy love.
    This will I send, and something else more plain,
    That shall express my true love's fasting pain.
    O, would the king, Biron, and Longaville,
    Were lovers too! Ill, to example ill,
    Would from my forehead wipe a perjured note;
    For none offend where all alike do dote.

    Longaville. [Advancing] Dumain, thy love is far from charity.
    You may look pale, but I should blush, I know,
    To be o'erheard and taken napping so.

22 IV, 3, 1541
  • It did move him to passion, and therefore let's hear it.
  • It did move him to passion, and therefore let's hear it.
  • Biron. A toy, my liege, a toy: your grace needs not fear it.

    Longaville. It did move him to passion, and therefore let's hear it.

23 IV, 3, 1611
  • And since her time are colliers counted bright.
  • And since her time are colliers counted bright.
  • Dumain. To look like her are chimney-sweepers black.

    Longaville. And since her time are colliers counted bright.

24 IV, 3, 1621
  • Look, here's thy love: my foot and her face see.
  • Look, here's thy love: my foot and her face see.
  • Dumain. I never knew man hold vile stuff so dear.

    Longaville. Look, here's thy love: my foot and her face see.

25 IV, 3, 1631
  • O, some authority how to proceed;
    Some tricks, some quillets, how to cheat t...
  • O, some authority how to proceed;
    Some tricks, some quillets, how to cheat the devil.
  • Dumain. Ay, marry, there; some flattery for this evil.

    Longaville. O, some authority how to proceed;
    Some tricks, some quillets, how to cheat the devil.

26 IV, 3, 1715
  • Now to plain-dealing; lay these glozes by:
    Shall we resolve to woo these gir...
  • Now to plain-dealing; lay these glozes by:
    Shall we resolve to woo these girls of France?
  • Biron. Advance your standards, and upon them, lords;
    Pell-mell, down with them! but be first advised,
    In conflict that you get the sun of them.

    Longaville. Now to plain-dealing; lay these glozes by:
    Shall we resolve to woo these girls of France?

27 V, 2, 2150
  • I know the reason, lady, why you ask.
  • I know the reason, lady, why you ask.
  • Katharine. What, was your vizard made without a tongue?

    Longaville. I know the reason, lady, why you ask.

28 V, 2, 2152
  • You have a double tongue within your mask,
    And would afford my speechless vi...
  • You have a double tongue within your mask,
    And would afford my speechless vizard half.
  • Katharine. O for your reason! quickly, sir; I long.

    Longaville. You have a double tongue within your mask,
    And would afford my speechless vizard half.

29 V, 2, 2155
  • A calf, fair lady!
  • A calf, fair lady!
  • Katharine. Veal, quoth the Dutchman. Is not 'veal' a calf?

    Longaville. A calf, fair lady!

30 V, 2, 2157
  • Let's part the word.
  • Let's part the word.
  • Katharine. No, a fair lord calf.

    Longaville. Let's part the word.

31 V, 2, 2160
  • Look, how you butt yourself in these sharp mocks!
    Will you give horns, chast...
  • Look, how you butt yourself in these sharp mocks!
    Will you give horns, chaste lady? do not so.
  • Katharine. No, I'll not be your half
    Take all, and wean it; it may prove an ox.

    Longaville. Look, how you butt yourself in these sharp mocks!
    Will you give horns, chaste lady? do not so.

32 V, 2, 2163
  • One word in private with you, ere I die.
  • One word in private with you, ere I die.
  • Katharine. Then die a calf, before your horns do grow.

    Longaville. One word in private with you, ere I die.

33 V, 2, 2555
  • The face of an old Roman coin, scarce seen.
  • The face of an old Roman coin, scarce seen.
  • Biron. A Death's face in a ring.

    Longaville. The face of an old Roman coin, scarce seen.

34 V, 2, 2580
  • His leg is too big for Hector's.
  • His leg is too big for Hector's.
  • Ferdinand. I think Hector was not so clean-timbered.

    Longaville. His leg is too big for Hector's.

35 V, 2, 2589
  • Stuck with cloves.
  • Stuck with cloves.
  • Biron. A lemon.

    Longaville. Stuck with cloves.

36 V, 2, 2598
  • That columbine.
  • That columbine.
  • Dumain. That mint.

    Longaville. That columbine.

37 V, 2, 2600
  • I must rather give it the rein, for it runs against Hector.
  • I must rather give it the rein, for it runs against Hector.
  • Don Adriano de Armado. Sweet Lord Longaville, rein thy tongue.

    Longaville. I must rather give it the rein, for it runs against Hector.

38 V, 2, 2726
  • So did our looks.
  • So did our looks.
  • Dumain. Our letters, madam, show'd much more than jest.

    Longaville. So did our looks.

39 V, 2, 2775
  • What says Maria?
  • What says Maria?
  • Katharine. Yet swear not, lest ye be forsworn again.

    Longaville. What says Maria?

40 V, 2, 2778
  • I'll stay with patience; but the time is long.
  • I'll stay with patience; but the time is long.
  • Maria. At the twelvemonth's end
    I'll change my black gown for a faithful friend.

    Longaville. I'll stay with patience; but the time is long.

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