Speeches (Lines) for Lorenzo in "The Merchant of Venice"

Total: 47
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 1
  • My Lord Bassanio, since you have found Antonio,
    We two will leave you: but a...
  • My Lord Bassanio, since you have found Antonio,
    We two will leave you: but at dinner-time,
    I pray you, have in mind where we must meet.
  • Salarino. We'll make our leisures to attend on yours.

    Lorenzo. My Lord Bassanio, since you have found Antonio,
    We two will leave you: but at dinner-time,
    I pray you, have in mind where we must meet.

2 I / 1
  • Well, we will leave you then till dinner-time:
    I must be one of these same d...
  • Well, we will leave you then till dinner-time:
    I must be one of these same dumb wise men,
    For Gratiano never lets me speak.
  • Gratiano. Let me play the fool:
    With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles come,
    And let my liver rather heat with wine
    Than my heart cool with mortifying groans.
    Why should a man, whose blood is warm within,
    Sit like his grandsire cut in alabaster?
    Sleep when he wakes and creep into the jaundice
    By being peevish? I tell thee what, Antonio--
    I love thee, and it is my love that speaks--
    There are a sort of men whose visages
    Do cream and mantle like a standing pond,
    And do a wilful stillness entertain,
    With purpose to be dress'd in an opinion
    Of wisdom, gravity, profound conceit,
    As who should say 'I am Sir Oracle,
    And when I ope my lips let no dog bark!'
    O my Antonio, I do know of these
    That therefore only are reputed wise
    For saying nothing; when, I am very sure,
    If they should speak, would almost damn those ears,
    Which, hearing them, would call their brothers fools.
    I'll tell thee more of this another time:
    But fish not, with this melancholy bait,
    For this fool gudgeon, this opinion.
    Come, good Lorenzo. Fare ye well awhile:
    I'll end my exhortation after dinner.

    Lorenzo. Well, we will leave you then till dinner-time:
    I must be one of these same dumb wise men,
    For Gratiano never lets me speak.

3 II / 4
  • Nay, we will slink away in supper-time,
    Disguise us at my lodging and return...
  • Nay, we will slink away in supper-time,
    Disguise us at my lodging and return,
    All in an hour.
  • Jessica. Farewell, good Launcelot.
    [Exit Launcelot]
    Alack, what heinous sin is it in me
    To be ashamed to be my father's child!
    But though I am a daughter to his blood,
    I am not to his manners. O Lorenzo,
    If thou keep promise, I shall end this strife,
    Become a Christian and thy loving wife.

    Lorenzo. Nay, we will slink away in supper-time,
    Disguise us at my lodging and return,
    All in an hour.

4 II / 4
  • 'Tis now but four o'clock: we have two hours
    To furnish us.
    [Enter LAUNC...
  • 'Tis now but four o'clock: we have two hours
    To furnish us.
    [Enter LAUNCELOT, with a letter]
    Friend Launcelot, what's the news?
  • Salanio. 'Tis vile, unless it may be quaintly order'd,
    And better in my mind not undertook.

    Lorenzo. 'Tis now but four o'clock: we have two hours
    To furnish us.
    [Enter LAUNCELOT, with a letter]
    Friend Launcelot, what's the news?

5 II / 4
  • I know the hand: in faith, 'tis a fair hand;
    And whiter than the paper it wr...
  • I know the hand: in faith, 'tis a fair hand;
    And whiter than the paper it writ on
    Is the fair hand that writ.
  • Launcelot Gobbo. An it shall please you to break up
    this, it shall seem to signify.

    Lorenzo. I know the hand: in faith, 'tis a fair hand;
    And whiter than the paper it writ on
    Is the fair hand that writ.

6 II / 4
  • Whither goest thou?
  • Whither goest thou?
  • Launcelot Gobbo. By your leave, sir.

    Lorenzo. Whither goest thou?

7 II / 4
  • Hold here, take this: tell gentle Jessica
    I will not fail her; speak it priv...
  • Hold here, take this: tell gentle Jessica
    I will not fail her; speak it privately.
    Go, gentlemen,
    [Exit Launcelot]
    Will you prepare you for this masque tonight?
    I am provided of a torch-bearer.
  • Launcelot Gobbo. Marry, sir, to bid my old master the
    Jew to sup to-night with my new master the Christian.

    Lorenzo. Hold here, take this: tell gentle Jessica
    I will not fail her; speak it privately.
    Go, gentlemen,
    [Exit Launcelot]
    Will you prepare you for this masque tonight?
    I am provided of a torch-bearer.

8 II / 4
  • Meet me and Gratiano
    At Gratiano's lodging some hour hence.
  • Meet me and Gratiano
    At Gratiano's lodging some hour hence.
  • Salanio. And so will I.

    Lorenzo. Meet me and Gratiano
    At Gratiano's lodging some hour hence.

9 II / 4
  • I must needs tell thee all. She hath directed
    How I shall take her from her...
  • I must needs tell thee all. She hath directed
    How I shall take her from her father's house,
    What gold and jewels she is furnish'd with,
    What page's suit she hath in readiness.
    If e'er the Jew her father come to heaven,
    It will be for his gentle daughter's sake:
    And never dare misfortune cross her foot,
    Unless she do it under this excuse,
    That she is issue to a faithless Jew.
    Come, go with me; peruse this as thou goest:
    Fair Jessica shall be my torch-bearer.
  • Gratiano. Was not that letter from fair Jessica?

    Lorenzo. I must needs tell thee all. She hath directed
    How I shall take her from her father's house,
    What gold and jewels she is furnish'd with,
    What page's suit she hath in readiness.
    If e'er the Jew her father come to heaven,
    It will be for his gentle daughter's sake:
    And never dare misfortune cross her foot,
    Unless she do it under this excuse,
    That she is issue to a faithless Jew.
    Come, go with me; peruse this as thou goest:
    Fair Jessica shall be my torch-bearer.

10 II / 6
  • Sweet friends, your patience for my long abode;
    Not I, but my affairs, have...
  • Sweet friends, your patience for my long abode;
    Not I, but my affairs, have made you wait:
    When you shall please to play the thieves for wives,
    I'll watch as long for you then. Approach;
    Here dwells my father Jew. Ho! who's within?
  • Salarino. Here comes Lorenzo: more of this hereafter.

    Lorenzo. Sweet friends, your patience for my long abode;
    Not I, but my affairs, have made you wait:
    When you shall please to play the thieves for wives,
    I'll watch as long for you then. Approach;
    Here dwells my father Jew. Ho! who's within?

11 II / 6
  • Lorenzo, and thy love.
  • Lorenzo, and thy love.
  • Jessica. Who are you? Tell me, for more certainty,
    Albeit I'll swear that I do know your tongue.

    Lorenzo. Lorenzo, and thy love.

12 II / 6
  • Heaven and thy thoughts are witness that thou art.
  • Heaven and thy thoughts are witness that thou art.
  • Jessica. Lorenzo, certain, and my love indeed,
    For who love I so much? And now who knows
    But you, Lorenzo, whether I am yours?

    Lorenzo. Heaven and thy thoughts are witness that thou art.

13 II / 6
  • Descend, for you must be my torchbearer.
  • Descend, for you must be my torchbearer.
  • Jessica. Here, catch this casket; it is worth the pains.
    I am glad 'tis night, you do not look on me,
    For I am much ashamed of my exchange:
    But love is blind and lovers cannot see
    The pretty follies that themselves commit;
    For if they could, Cupid himself would blush
    To see me thus transformed to a boy.

    Lorenzo. Descend, for you must be my torchbearer.

14 II / 6
  • So are you, sweet,
    Even in the lovely garnish of a boy.
    But come at once...
  • So are you, sweet,
    Even in the lovely garnish of a boy.
    But come at once;
    For the close night doth play the runaway,
    And we are stay'd for at Bassanio's feast.
  • Jessica. What, must I hold a candle to my shames?
    They in themselves, good-sooth, are too too light.
    Why, 'tis an office of discovery, love;
    And I should be obscured.

    Lorenzo. So are you, sweet,
    Even in the lovely garnish of a boy.
    But come at once;
    For the close night doth play the runaway,
    And we are stay'd for at Bassanio's feast.

15 II / 6
  • Beshrew me but I love her heartily;
    For she is wise, if I can judge of her,...
  • Beshrew me but I love her heartily;
    For she is wise, if I can judge of her,
    And fair she is, if that mine eyes be true,
    And true she is, as she hath proved herself,
    And therefore, like herself, wise, fair and true,
    Shall she be placed in my constant soul.
    [Enter JESSICA, below]
    What, art thou come? On, gentlemen; away!
    Our masquing mates by this time for us stay.
  • Gratiano. Now, by my hood, a Gentile and no Jew.

    Lorenzo. Beshrew me but I love her heartily;
    For she is wise, if I can judge of her,
    And fair she is, if that mine eyes be true,
    And true she is, as she hath proved herself,
    And therefore, like herself, wise, fair and true,
    Shall she be placed in my constant soul.
    [Enter JESSICA, below]
    What, art thou come? On, gentlemen; away!
    Our masquing mates by this time for us stay.

16 III / 2
  • I thank your honour. For my part, my lord,
    My purpose was not to have seen y...
  • I thank your honour. For my part, my lord,
    My purpose was not to have seen you here;
    But meeting with Salerio by the way,
    He did entreat me, past all saying nay,
    To come with him along.
  • Portia. So do I, my lord:
    They are entirely welcome.

    Lorenzo. I thank your honour. For my part, my lord,
    My purpose was not to have seen you here;
    But meeting with Salerio by the way,
    He did entreat me, past all saying nay,
    To come with him along.

17 III / 4
  • Madam, although I speak it in your presence,
    You have a noble and a true con...
  • Madam, although I speak it in your presence,
    You have a noble and a true conceit
    Of godlike amity; which appears most strongly
    In bearing thus the absence of your lord.
    But if you knew to whom you show this honour,
    How true a gentleman you send relief,
    How dear a lover of my lord your husband,
    I know you would be prouder of the work
    Than customary bounty can enforce you.
  • Antonio. The duke cannot deny the course of law:
    For the commodity that strangers have
    With us in Venice, if it be denied,
    Will much impeach the justice of his state;
    Since that the trade and profit of the city
    Consisteth of all nations. Therefore, go:
    These griefs and losses have so bated me,
    That I shall hardly spare a pound of flesh
    To-morrow to my bloody creditor.
    Well, gaoler, on. Pray God, Bassanio come
    To see me pay his debt, and then I care not!

    Lorenzo. Madam, although I speak it in your presence,
    You have a noble and a true conceit
    Of godlike amity; which appears most strongly
    In bearing thus the absence of your lord.
    But if you knew to whom you show this honour,
    How true a gentleman you send relief,
    How dear a lover of my lord your husband,
    I know you would be prouder of the work
    Than customary bounty can enforce you.

18 III / 4
  • Madam, with all my heart;
    I shall obey you in all fair commands.
  • Madam, with all my heart;
    I shall obey you in all fair commands.
  • Portia. I never did repent for doing good,
    Nor shall not now: for in companions
    That do converse and waste the time together,
    Whose souls do bear an equal yoke Of love,
    There must be needs a like proportion
    Of lineaments, of manners and of spirit;
    Which makes me think that this Antonio,
    Being the bosom lover of my lord,
    Must needs be like my lord. If it be so,
    How little is the cost I have bestow'd
    In purchasing the semblance of my soul
    From out the state of hellish misery!
    This comes too near the praising of myself;
    Therefore no more of it: hear other things.
    Lorenzo, I commit into your hands
    The husbandry and manage of my house
    Until my lord's return: for mine own part,
    I have toward heaven breathed a secret vow
    To live in prayer and contemplation,
    Only attended by Nerissa here,
    Until her husband and my lord's return:
    There is a monastery two miles off;
    And there will we abide. I do desire you
    Not to deny this imposition;
    The which my love and some necessity
    Now lays upon you.

    Lorenzo. Madam, with all my heart;
    I shall obey you in all fair commands.

19 III / 4
  • Fair thoughts and happy hours attend on you!
  • Fair thoughts and happy hours attend on you!
  • Portia. My people do already know my mind,
    And will acknowledge you and Jessica
    In place of Lord Bassanio and myself.
    And so farewell, till we shall meet again.

    Lorenzo. Fair thoughts and happy hours attend on you!

20 III / 5
  • I shall grow jealous of you shortly, Launcelot, if
    you thus get my wife into...
  • I shall grow jealous of you shortly, Launcelot, if
    you thus get my wife into corners.
  • Jessica. I'll tell my husband, Launcelot, what you say: here he comes.

    Lorenzo. I shall grow jealous of you shortly, Launcelot, if
    you thus get my wife into corners.

21 III / 5
  • I shall answer that better to the commonwealth than
    you can the getting up o...
  • I shall answer that better to the commonwealth than
    you can the getting up of the negro's belly: the
    Moor is with child by you, Launcelot.
  • Jessica. Nay, you need not fear us, Lorenzo: Launcelot and I
    are out. He tells me flatly, there is no mercy for
    me in heaven, because I am a Jew's daughter: and he
    says, you are no good member of the commonwealth,
    for in converting Jews to Christians, you raise the
    price of pork.

    Lorenzo. I shall answer that better to the commonwealth than
    you can the getting up of the negro's belly: the
    Moor is with child by you, Launcelot.

22 III / 5
  • How every fool can play upon the word! I think the
    best grace of wit will sh...
  • How every fool can play upon the word! I think the
    best grace of wit will shortly turn into silence,
    and discourse grow commendable in none only but
    parrots. Go in, sirrah; bid them prepare for dinner.
  • Launcelot Gobbo. It is much that the Moor should be more than reason:
    but if she be less than an honest woman, she is
    indeed more than I took her for.

    Lorenzo. How every fool can play upon the word! I think the
    best grace of wit will shortly turn into silence,
    and discourse grow commendable in none only but
    parrots. Go in, sirrah; bid them prepare for dinner.

23 III / 5
  • Goodly Lord, what a wit-snapper are you! then bid
    them prepare dinner.
  • Goodly Lord, what a wit-snapper are you! then bid
    them prepare dinner.
  • Launcelot Gobbo. That is done, sir; they have all stomachs.

    Lorenzo. Goodly Lord, what a wit-snapper are you! then bid
    them prepare dinner.

24 III / 5
  • Will you cover then, sir?
  • Will you cover then, sir?
  • Launcelot Gobbo. That is done too, sir; only 'cover' is the word.

    Lorenzo. Will you cover then, sir?

25 III / 5
  • Yet more quarrelling with occasion! Wilt thou show
    the whole wealth of thy w...
  • Yet more quarrelling with occasion! Wilt thou show
    the whole wealth of thy wit in an instant? I pray
    tree, understand a plain man in his plain meaning:
    go to thy fellows; bid them cover the table, serve
    in the meat, and we will come in to dinner.
  • Launcelot Gobbo. Not so, sir, neither; I know my duty.

    Lorenzo. Yet more quarrelling with occasion! Wilt thou show
    the whole wealth of thy wit in an instant? I pray
    tree, understand a plain man in his plain meaning:
    go to thy fellows; bid them cover the table, serve
    in the meat, and we will come in to dinner.

26 III / 5
  • O dear discretion, how his words are suited!
    The fool hath planted in his me...
  • O dear discretion, how his words are suited!
    The fool hath planted in his memory
    An army of good words; and I do know
    A many fools, that stand in better place,
    Garnish'd like him, that for a tricksy word
    Defy the matter. How cheerest thou, Jessica?
    And now, good sweet, say thy opinion,
    How dost thou like the Lord Bassanio's wife?
  • Launcelot Gobbo. For the table, sir, it shall be served in; for the
    meat, sir, it shall be covered; for your coming in
    to dinner, sir, why, let it be as humours and
    conceits shall govern.

    Lorenzo. O dear discretion, how his words are suited!
    The fool hath planted in his memory
    An army of good words; and I do know
    A many fools, that stand in better place,
    Garnish'd like him, that for a tricksy word
    Defy the matter. How cheerest thou, Jessica?
    And now, good sweet, say thy opinion,
    How dost thou like the Lord Bassanio's wife?

27 III / 5
  • Even such a husband
    Hast thou of me as she is for a wife.
  • Even such a husband
    Hast thou of me as she is for a wife.
  • Jessica. Past all expressing. It is very meet
    The Lord Bassanio live an upright life;
    For, having such a blessing in his lady,
    He finds the joys of heaven here on earth;
    And if on earth he do not mean it, then
    In reason he should never come to heaven
    Why, if two gods should play some heavenly match
    And on the wager lay two earthly women,
    And Portia one, there must be something else
    Pawn'd with the other, for the poor rude world
    Hath not her fellow.

    Lorenzo. Even such a husband
    Hast thou of me as she is for a wife.

28 III / 5
  • I will anon: first, let us go to dinner.
  • I will anon: first, let us go to dinner.
  • Jessica. Nay, but ask my opinion too of that.

    Lorenzo. I will anon: first, let us go to dinner.

29 III / 5
  • No, pray thee, let it serve for table-talk;
    I shall digest it.
  • No, pray thee, let it serve for table-talk;
    I shall digest it.
  • Jessica. Nay, let me praise you while I have a stomach.

    Lorenzo. No, pray thee, let it serve for table-talk;
    I shall digest it.

30 V / 1
  • The moon shines bright: in such a night as this,
    When the sweet wind did gen...
  • The moon shines bright: in such a night as this,
    When the sweet wind did gently kiss the trees
    And they did make no noise, in such a night
    Troilus methinks mounted the Troyan walls
    And sigh'd his soul toward the Grecian tents,
    Where Cressid lay that night.
  • Nerissa. Come, good sir, will you show me to this house?

    Lorenzo. The moon shines bright: in such a night as this,
    When the sweet wind did gently kiss the trees
    And they did make no noise, in such a night
    Troilus methinks mounted the Troyan walls
    And sigh'd his soul toward the Grecian tents,
    Where Cressid lay that night.

31 V / 1
  • In such a night
    Stood Dido with a willow in her hand
    Upon the wild sea b...
  • In such a night
    Stood Dido with a willow in her hand
    Upon the wild sea banks and waft her love
    To come again to Carthage.
  • Jessica. In such a night
    Did Thisbe fearfully o'ertrip the dew
    And saw the lion's shadow ere himself
    And ran dismay'd away.

    Lorenzo. In such a night
    Stood Dido with a willow in her hand
    Upon the wild sea banks and waft her love
    To come again to Carthage.

32 V / 1
  • In such a night
    Did Jessica steal from the wealthy Jew
    And with an unthr...
  • In such a night
    Did Jessica steal from the wealthy Jew
    And with an unthrift love did run from Venice
    As far as Belmont.
  • Jessica. In such a night
    Medea gather'd the enchanted herbs
    That did renew old AEson.

    Lorenzo. In such a night
    Did Jessica steal from the wealthy Jew
    And with an unthrift love did run from Venice
    As far as Belmont.

33 V / 1
  • In such a night
    Did pretty Jessica, like a little shrew,
    Slander her lov...
  • In such a night
    Did pretty Jessica, like a little shrew,
    Slander her love, and he forgave it her.
  • Jessica. In such a night
    Did young Lorenzo swear he loved her well,
    Stealing her soul with many vows of faith
    And ne'er a true one.

    Lorenzo. In such a night
    Did pretty Jessica, like a little shrew,
    Slander her love, and he forgave it her.

34 V / 1
  • Who comes so fast in silence of the night?
  • Who comes so fast in silence of the night?
  • Jessica. I would out-night you, did no body come;
    But, hark, I hear the footing of a man.

    Lorenzo. Who comes so fast in silence of the night?

35 V / 1
  • A friend! what friend? your name, I pray you, friend?
  • A friend! what friend? your name, I pray you, friend?
  • Stephano. A friend.

    Lorenzo. A friend! what friend? your name, I pray you, friend?

36 V / 1
  • Who comes with her?
  • Who comes with her?
  • Stephano. Stephano is my name; and I bring word
    My mistress will before the break of day
    Be here at Belmont; she doth stray about
    By holy crosses, where she kneels and prays
    For happy wedlock hours.

    Lorenzo. Who comes with her?

37 V / 1
  • He is not, nor we have not heard from him.
    But go we in, I pray thee, Jessic...
  • He is not, nor we have not heard from him.
    But go we in, I pray thee, Jessica,
    And ceremoniously let us prepare
    Some welcome for the mistress of the house.
  • Stephano. None but a holy hermit and her maid.
    I pray you, is my master yet return'd?

    Lorenzo. He is not, nor we have not heard from him.
    But go we in, I pray thee, Jessica,
    And ceremoniously let us prepare
    Some welcome for the mistress of the house.

38 V / 1
  • Who calls?
  • Who calls?
  • Launcelot Gobbo. Sola, sola! wo ha, ho! sola, sola!

    Lorenzo. Who calls?

39 V / 1
  • Leave hollaing, man: here.
  • Leave hollaing, man: here.
  • Launcelot Gobbo. Sola! did you see Master Lorenzo?
    Master Lorenzo, sola, sola!

    Lorenzo. Leave hollaing, man: here.

40 V / 1
  • Here.
  • Here.
  • Launcelot Gobbo. Sola! where? where?

    Lorenzo. Here.

41 V / 1
  • Sweet soul, let's in, and there expect their coming.
    And yet no matter: why...
  • Sweet soul, let's in, and there expect their coming.
    And yet no matter: why should we go in?
    My friend Stephano, signify, I pray you,
    Within the house, your mistress is at hand;
    And bring your music forth into the air.
    [Exit Stephano]
    How sweet the moonlight sleeps upon this bank!
    Here will we sit and let the sounds of music
    Creep in our ears: soft stillness and the night
    Become the touches of sweet harmony.
    Sit, Jessica. Look how the floor of heaven
    Is thick inlaid with patines of bright gold:
    There's not the smallest orb which thou behold'st
    But in his motion like an angel sings,
    Still quiring to the young-eyed cherubins;
    Such harmony is in immortal souls;
    But whilst this muddy vesture of decay
    Doth grossly close it in, we cannot hear it.
    [Enter Musicians]
    Come, ho! and wake Diana with a hymn!
    With sweetest touches pierce your mistress' ear,
    And draw her home with music.
  • Launcelot Gobbo. Tell him there's a post come from my master, with
    his horn full of good news: my master will be here
    ere morning.

    Lorenzo. Sweet soul, let's in, and there expect their coming.
    And yet no matter: why should we go in?
    My friend Stephano, signify, I pray you,
    Within the house, your mistress is at hand;
    And bring your music forth into the air.
    [Exit Stephano]
    How sweet the moonlight sleeps upon this bank!
    Here will we sit and let the sounds of music
    Creep in our ears: soft stillness and the night
    Become the touches of sweet harmony.
    Sit, Jessica. Look how the floor of heaven
    Is thick inlaid with patines of bright gold:
    There's not the smallest orb which thou behold'st
    But in his motion like an angel sings,
    Still quiring to the young-eyed cherubins;
    Such harmony is in immortal souls;
    But whilst this muddy vesture of decay
    Doth grossly close it in, we cannot hear it.
    [Enter Musicians]
    Come, ho! and wake Diana with a hymn!
    With sweetest touches pierce your mistress' ear,
    And draw her home with music.

42 V / 1
  • The reason is, your spirits are attentive:
    For do but note a wild and wanton...
  • The reason is, your spirits are attentive:
    For do but note a wild and wanton herd,
    Or race of youthful and unhandled colts,
    Fetching mad bounds, bellowing and neighing loud,
    Which is the hot condition of their blood;
    If they but hear perchance a trumpet sound,
    Or any air of music touch their ears,
    You shall perceive them make a mutual stand,
    Their savage eyes turn'd to a modest gaze
    By the sweet power of music: therefore the poet
    Did feign that Orpheus drew trees, stones and floods;
    Since nought so stockish, hard and full of rage,
    But music for the time doth change his nature.
    The man that hath no music in himself,
    Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds,
    Is fit for treasons, stratagems and spoils;
    The motions of his spirit are dull as night
    And his affections dark as Erebus:
    Let no such man be trusted. Mark the music.
  • Jessica. I am never merry when I hear sweet music.

    Lorenzo. The reason is, your spirits are attentive:
    For do but note a wild and wanton herd,
    Or race of youthful and unhandled colts,
    Fetching mad bounds, bellowing and neighing loud,
    Which is the hot condition of their blood;
    If they but hear perchance a trumpet sound,
    Or any air of music touch their ears,
    You shall perceive them make a mutual stand,
    Their savage eyes turn'd to a modest gaze
    By the sweet power of music: therefore the poet
    Did feign that Orpheus drew trees, stones and floods;
    Since nought so stockish, hard and full of rage,
    But music for the time doth change his nature.
    The man that hath no music in himself,
    Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds,
    Is fit for treasons, stratagems and spoils;
    The motions of his spirit are dull as night
    And his affections dark as Erebus:
    Let no such man be trusted. Mark the music.

43 V / 1
  • That is the voice,
    Or I am much deceived, of Portia.
  • That is the voice,
    Or I am much deceived, of Portia.
  • Portia. The crow doth sing as sweetly as the lark,
    When neither is attended, and I think
    The nightingale, if she should sing by day,
    When every goose is cackling, would be thought
    No better a musician than the wren.
    How many things by season season'd are
    To their right praise and true perfection!
    Peace, ho! the moon sleeps with Endymion
    And would not be awaked.

    Lorenzo. That is the voice,
    Or I am much deceived, of Portia.

44 V / 1
  • Dear lady, welcome home.
  • Dear lady, welcome home.
  • Portia. He knows me as the blind man knows the cuckoo,
    By the bad voice.

    Lorenzo. Dear lady, welcome home.

45 V / 1
  • Madam, they are not yet;
    But there is come a messenger before,
    To signif...
  • Madam, they are not yet;
    But there is come a messenger before,
    To signify their coming.
  • Portia. We have been praying for our husbands' healths,
    Which speed, we hope, the better for our words.
    Are they return'd?

    Lorenzo. Madam, they are not yet;
    But there is come a messenger before,
    To signify their coming.

46 V / 1
  • Your husband is at hand; I hear his trumpet:
    We are no tell-tales, madam; fe...
  • Your husband is at hand; I hear his trumpet:
    We are no tell-tales, madam; fear you not.
  • Portia. Go in, Nerissa;
    Give order to my servants that they take
    No note at all of our being absent hence;
    Nor you, Lorenzo; Jessica, nor you.

    Lorenzo. Your husband is at hand; I hear his trumpet:
    We are no tell-tales, madam; fear you not.

47 V / 1
  • Fair ladies, you drop manna in the way
    Of starved people.
  • Fair ladies, you drop manna in the way
    Of starved people.
  • Nerissa. Ay, and I'll give them him without a fee.
    There do I give to you and Jessica,
    From the rich Jew, a special deed of gift,
    After his death, of all he dies possess'd of.

    Lorenzo. Fair ladies, you drop manna in the way
    Of starved people.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.