Speeches (Lines) for Malvolio in "Twelfth Night; or, What You Will"

Total: 87
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 5
  • Yes, and shall do till the pangs of death shake him:
    infirmity, that decays...
  • Yes, and shall do till the pangs of death shake him:
    infirmity, that decays the wise, doth ever make the
    better fool.
  • Olivia. What think you of this fool, Malvolio? doth he not mend?

    Malvolio. Yes, and shall do till the pangs of death shake him:
    infirmity, that decays the wise, doth ever make the
    better fool.

2 I / 5
  • I marvel your ladyship takes delight in such a
    barren rascal: I saw him put...
  • I marvel your ladyship takes delight in such a
    barren rascal: I saw him put down the other day
    with an ordinary fool that has no more brain
    than a stone. Look you now, he's out of his guard
    already; unless you laugh and minister occasion to
    him, he is gagged. I protest, I take these wise men,
    that crow so at these set kind of fools, no better
    than the fools' zanies.
  • Olivia. How say you to that, Malvolio?

    Malvolio. I marvel your ladyship takes delight in such a
    barren rascal: I saw him put down the other day
    with an ordinary fool that has no more brain
    than a stone. Look you now, he's out of his guard
    already; unless you laugh and minister occasion to
    him, he is gagged. I protest, I take these wise men,
    that crow so at these set kind of fools, no better
    than the fools' zanies.

3 I / 5
  • Madam, yond young fellow swears he will speak with
    you. I told him you were...
  • Madam, yond young fellow swears he will speak with
    you. I told him you were sick; he takes on him to
    understand so much, and therefore comes to speak
    with you. I told him you were asleep; he seems to
    have a foreknowledge of that too, and therefore
    comes to speak with you. What is to be said to him,
    lady? he's fortified against any denial.
  • Feste. He is but mad yet, madonna; and the fool shall look
    to the madman.

    Malvolio. Madam, yond young fellow swears he will speak with
    you. I told him you were sick; he takes on him to
    understand so much, and therefore comes to speak
    with you. I told him you were asleep; he seems to
    have a foreknowledge of that too, and therefore
    comes to speak with you. What is to be said to him,
    lady? he's fortified against any denial.

4 I / 5
  • Has been told so; and he says, he'll stand at your
    door like a sheriff's pos...
  • Has been told so; and he says, he'll stand at your
    door like a sheriff's post, and be the supporter to
    a bench, but he'll speak with you.
  • Olivia. Tell him he shall not speak with me.

    Malvolio. Has been told so; and he says, he'll stand at your
    door like a sheriff's post, and be the supporter to
    a bench, but he'll speak with you.

5 I / 5
  • Why, of mankind.
  • Why, of mankind.
  • Olivia. What kind o' man is he?

    Malvolio. Why, of mankind.

6 I / 5
  • Of very ill manner; he'll speak with you, will you or no.
  • Of very ill manner; he'll speak with you, will you or no.
  • Olivia. What manner of man?

    Malvolio. Of very ill manner; he'll speak with you, will you or no.

7 I / 5
  • Not yet old enough for a man, nor young enough for
    a boy; as a squash is bef...
  • Not yet old enough for a man, nor young enough for
    a boy; as a squash is before 'tis a peascod, or a
    cooling when 'tis almost an apple: 'tis with him
    in standing water, between boy and man. He is very
    well-favoured and he speaks very shrewishly; one
    would think his mother's milk were scarce out of him.
  • Olivia. Of what personage and years is he?

    Malvolio. Not yet old enough for a man, nor young enough for
    a boy; as a squash is before 'tis a peascod, or a
    cooling when 'tis almost an apple: 'tis with him
    in standing water, between boy and man. He is very
    well-favoured and he speaks very shrewishly; one
    would think his mother's milk were scarce out of him.

8 I / 5
  • Gentlewoman, my lady calls.
  • Gentlewoman, my lady calls.
  • Olivia. Let him approach: call in my gentlewoman.

    Malvolio. Gentlewoman, my lady calls.

9 I / 5
  • Here, madam, at your service.
  • Here, madam, at your service.
  • Olivia. 'What is your parentage?'
    'Above my fortunes, yet my state is well:
    I am a gentleman.' I'll be sworn thou art;
    Thy tongue, thy face, thy limbs, actions and spirit,
    Do give thee five-fold blazon: not too fast:
    soft, soft!
    Unless the master were the man. How now!
    Even so quickly may one catch the plague?
    Methinks I feel this youth's perfections
    With an invisible and subtle stealth
    To creep in at mine eyes. Well, let it be.
    What ho, Malvolio!

    Malvolio. Here, madam, at your service.

10 I / 5
  • Madam, I will.
  • Madam, I will.
  • Olivia. Run after that same peevish messenger,
    The county's man: he left this ring behind him,
    Would I or not: tell him I'll none of it.
    Desire him not to flatter with his lord,
    Nor hold him up with hopes; I am not for him:
    If that the youth will come this way to-morrow,
    I'll give him reasons for't: hie thee, Malvolio.

    Malvolio. Madam, I will.

11 II / 2
  • Were not you even now with the Countess Olivia?
  • Were not you even now with the Countess Olivia?
  • Antonio. The gentleness of all the gods go with thee!
    I have many enemies in Orsino's court,
    Else would I very shortly see thee there.
    But, come what may, I do adore thee so,
    That danger shall seem sport, and I will go.

    Malvolio. Were not you even now with the Countess Olivia?

12 II / 2
  • She returns this ring to you, sir: you might have
    saved me my pains, to have...
  • She returns this ring to you, sir: you might have
    saved me my pains, to have taken it away yourself.
    She adds, moreover, that you should put your lord
    into a desperate assurance she will none of him:
    and one thing more, that you be never so hardy to
    come again in his affairs, unless it be to report
    your lord's taking of this. Receive it so.
  • Viola. Even now, sir; on a moderate pace I have since
    arrived but hither.

    Malvolio. She returns this ring to you, sir: you might have
    saved me my pains, to have taken it away yourself.
    She adds, moreover, that you should put your lord
    into a desperate assurance she will none of him:
    and one thing more, that you be never so hardy to
    come again in his affairs, unless it be to report
    your lord's taking of this. Receive it so.

13 II / 2
  • Come, sir, you peevishly threw it to her; and her
    will is, it should be so r...
  • Come, sir, you peevishly threw it to her; and her
    will is, it should be so returned: if it be worth
    stooping for, there it lies in your eye; if not, be
    it his that finds it.
  • Viola. She took the ring of me: I'll none of it.

    Malvolio. Come, sir, you peevishly threw it to her; and her
    will is, it should be so returned: if it be worth
    stooping for, there it lies in your eye; if not, be
    it his that finds it.

14 II / 3
  • My masters, are you mad? or what are you? Have ye
    no wit, manners, nor hones...
  • My masters, are you mad? or what are you? Have ye
    no wit, manners, nor honesty, but to gabble like
    tinkers at this time of night? Do ye make an
    alehouse of my lady's house, that ye squeak out your
    coziers' catches without any mitigation or remorse
    of voice? Is there no respect of place, persons, nor
    time in you?
  • Maria. For the love o' God, peace!

    Malvolio. My masters, are you mad? or what are you? Have ye
    no wit, manners, nor honesty, but to gabble like
    tinkers at this time of night? Do ye make an
    alehouse of my lady's house, that ye squeak out your
    coziers' catches without any mitigation or remorse
    of voice? Is there no respect of place, persons, nor
    time in you?

15 II / 3
  • Sir Toby, I must be round with you. My lady bade me
    tell you, that, though s...
  • Sir Toby, I must be round with you. My lady bade me
    tell you, that, though she harbours you as her
    kinsman, she's nothing allied to your disorders. If
    you can separate yourself and your misdemeanors, you
    are welcome to the house; if not, an it would please
    you to take leave of her, she is very willing to bid
    you farewell.
  • Sir Toby Belch. We did keep time, sir, in our catches. Sneck up!

    Malvolio. Sir Toby, I must be round with you. My lady bade me
    tell you, that, though she harbours you as her
    kinsman, she's nothing allied to your disorders. If
    you can separate yourself and your misdemeanors, you
    are welcome to the house; if not, an it would please
    you to take leave of her, she is very willing to bid
    you farewell.

16 II / 3
  • Is't even so?
  • Is't even so?
  • Feste. 'His eyes do show his days are almost done.'

    Malvolio. Is't even so?

17 II / 3
  • This is much credit to you.
  • This is much credit to you.
  • Feste. Sir Toby, there you lie.

    Malvolio. This is much credit to you.

18 II / 3
  • Mistress Mary, if you prized my lady's favour at any
    thing more than contemp...
  • Mistress Mary, if you prized my lady's favour at any
    thing more than contempt, you would not give means
    for this uncivil rule: she shall know of it, by this hand.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Thou'rt i' the right. Go, sir, rub your chain with
    crumbs. A stoup of wine, Maria!

    Malvolio. Mistress Mary, if you prized my lady's favour at any
    thing more than contempt, you would not give means
    for this uncivil rule: she shall know of it, by this hand.

19 II / 5
  • 'Tis but fortune; all is fortune. Maria once told
    me she did affect me: and...
  • 'Tis but fortune; all is fortune. Maria once told
    me she did affect me: and I have heard herself come
    thus near, that, should she fancy, it should be one
    of my complexion. Besides, she uses me with a more
    exalted respect than any one else that follows her.
    What should I think on't?
  • Maria. Get ye all three into the box-tree: Malvolio's
    coming down this walk: he has been yonder i' the
    sun practising behavior to his own shadow this half
    hour: observe him, for the love of mockery; for I
    know this letter will make a contemplative idiot of
    him. Close, in the name of jesting! Lie thou there,
    [Throws down a letter]
    for here comes the trout that must be caught with tickling.

    Malvolio. 'Tis but fortune; all is fortune. Maria once told
    me she did affect me: and I have heard herself come
    thus near, that, should she fancy, it should be one
    of my complexion. Besides, she uses me with a more
    exalted respect than any one else that follows her.
    What should I think on't?

20 II / 5
  • To be Count Malvolio!
  • To be Count Malvolio!
  • Sir Toby Belch. Peace, I say.

    Malvolio. To be Count Malvolio!

21 II / 5
  • There is example for't; the lady of the Strachy
    married the yeoman of the wa...
  • There is example for't; the lady of the Strachy
    married the yeoman of the wardrobe.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Peace, peace!

    Malvolio. There is example for't; the lady of the Strachy
    married the yeoman of the wardrobe.

22 II / 5
  • Having been three months married to her, sitting in
    my state,--
  • Having been three months married to her, sitting in
    my state,--
  • Fabian. O, peace! now he's deeply in: look how
    imagination blows him.

    Malvolio. Having been three months married to her, sitting in
    my state,--

23 II / 5
  • Calling my officers about me, in my branched velvet
    gown; having come from a...
  • Calling my officers about me, in my branched velvet
    gown; having come from a day-bed, where I have left
    Olivia sleeping,--
  • Sir Toby Belch. O, for a stone-bow, to hit him in the eye!

    Malvolio. Calling my officers about me, in my branched velvet
    gown; having come from a day-bed, where I have left
    Olivia sleeping,--

24 II / 5
  • And then to have the humour of state; and after a
    demure travel of regard, t...
  • And then to have the humour of state; and after a
    demure travel of regard, telling them I know my
    place as I would they should do theirs, to for my
    kinsman Toby,--
  • Fabian. O, peace, peace!

    Malvolio. And then to have the humour of state; and after a
    demure travel of regard, telling them I know my
    place as I would they should do theirs, to for my
    kinsman Toby,--

25 II / 5
  • Seven of my people, with an obedient start, make
    out for him: I frown the wh...
  • Seven of my people, with an obedient start, make
    out for him: I frown the while; and perchance wind
    up watch, or play with my--some rich jewel. Toby
    approaches; courtesies there to me,--
  • Fabian. O peace, peace, peace! now, now.

    Malvolio. Seven of my people, with an obedient start, make
    out for him: I frown the while; and perchance wind
    up watch, or play with my--some rich jewel. Toby
    approaches; courtesies there to me,--

26 II / 5
  • I extend my hand to him thus, quenching my familiar
    smile with an austere re...
  • I extend my hand to him thus, quenching my familiar
    smile with an austere regard of control,--
  • Fabian. Though our silence be drawn from us with cars, yet peace.

    Malvolio. I extend my hand to him thus, quenching my familiar
    smile with an austere regard of control,--

27 II / 5
  • Saying, 'Cousin Toby, my fortunes having cast me on
    your niece give me this...
  • Saying, 'Cousin Toby, my fortunes having cast me on
    your niece give me this prerogative of speech,'--
  • Sir Toby Belch. And does not Toby take you a blow o' the lips then?

    Malvolio. Saying, 'Cousin Toby, my fortunes having cast me on
    your niece give me this prerogative of speech,'--

28 II / 5
  • 'You must amend your drunkenness.'
  • 'You must amend your drunkenness.'
  • Sir Toby Belch. What, what?

    Malvolio. 'You must amend your drunkenness.'

29 II / 5
  • 'Besides, you waste the treasure of your time with
    a foolish knight,'--
  • 'Besides, you waste the treasure of your time with
    a foolish knight,'--
  • Fabian. Nay, patience, or we break the sinews of our plot.

    Malvolio. 'Besides, you waste the treasure of your time with
    a foolish knight,'--

30 II / 5
  • 'One Sir Andrew,'--
  • 'One Sir Andrew,'--
  • Sir Andrew Aguecheek. That's me, I warrant you.

    Malvolio. 'One Sir Andrew,'--

31 II / 5
  • What employment have we here?
  • What employment have we here?
  • Sir Andrew Aguecheek. I knew 'twas I; for many do call me fool.

    Malvolio. What employment have we here?

32 II / 5
  • By my life, this is my lady's hand these be her
    very C's, her U's and her T'...
  • By my life, this is my lady's hand these be her
    very C's, her U's and her T's and thus makes she her
    great P's. It is, in contempt of question, her hand.
  • Sir Toby Belch. O, peace! and the spirit of humour intimate reading
    aloud to him!

    Malvolio. By my life, this is my lady's hand these be her
    very C's, her U's and her T's and thus makes she her
    great P's. It is, in contempt of question, her hand.

33 II / 5
  • [Reads] 'To the unknown beloved, this, and my good
    wishes:'--her very phrase...
  • [Reads] 'To the unknown beloved, this, and my good
    wishes:'--her very phrases! By your leave, wax.
    Soft! and the impressure her Lucrece, with which she
    uses to seal: 'tis my lady. To whom should this be?
  • Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Her C's, her U's and her T's: why that?

    Malvolio. [Reads] 'To the unknown beloved, this, and my good
    wishes:'--her very phrases! By your leave, wax.
    Soft! and the impressure her Lucrece, with which she
    uses to seal: 'tis my lady. To whom should this be?

34 II / 5
  • [Reads]
    Jove knows I love: But who?
    Lips, do not move;
    No man must k...
  • [Reads]
    Jove knows I love: But who?
    Lips, do not move;
    No man must know.
    'No man must know.' What follows? the numbers
    altered! 'No man must know:' if this should be
    thee, Malvolio?
  • Fabian. This wins him, liver and all.

    Malvolio. [Reads]
    Jove knows I love: But who?
    Lips, do not move;
    No man must know.
    'No man must know.' What follows? the numbers
    altered! 'No man must know:' if this should be
    thee, Malvolio?

35 II / 5
  • [Reads]
    I may command where I adore;
    But silence, like a Lucrece knife,...
  • [Reads]
    I may command where I adore;
    But silence, like a Lucrece knife,
    With bloodless stroke my heart doth gore:
    M, O, A, I, doth sway my life.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Marry, hang thee, brock!

    Malvolio. [Reads]
    I may command where I adore;
    But silence, like a Lucrece knife,
    With bloodless stroke my heart doth gore:
    M, O, A, I, doth sway my life.

36 II / 5
  • 'M, O, A, I, doth sway my life.' Nay, but first, let
    me see, let me see, let...
  • 'M, O, A, I, doth sway my life.' Nay, but first, let
    me see, let me see, let me see.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Excellent wench, say I.

    Malvolio. 'M, O, A, I, doth sway my life.' Nay, but first, let
    me see, let me see, let me see.

37 II / 5
  • 'I may command where I adore.' Why, she may command
    me: I serve her; she is...
  • 'I may command where I adore.' Why, she may command
    me: I serve her; she is my lady. Why, this is
    evident to any formal capacity; there is no
    obstruction in this: and the end,--what should
    that alphabetical position portend? If I could make
    that resemble something in me,--Softly! M, O, A,
    I,--
  • Sir Toby Belch. And with what wing the staniel cheques at it!

    Malvolio. 'I may command where I adore.' Why, she may command
    me: I serve her; she is my lady. Why, this is
    evident to any formal capacity; there is no
    obstruction in this: and the end,--what should
    that alphabetical position portend? If I could make
    that resemble something in me,--Softly! M, O, A,
    I,--

38 II / 5
  • M,--Malvolio; M,--why, that begins my name.
  • M,--Malvolio; M,--why, that begins my name.
  • Fabian. Sowter will cry upon't for all this, though it be as
    rank as a fox.

    Malvolio. M,--Malvolio; M,--why, that begins my name.

39 II / 5
  • M,--but then there is no consonancy in the sequel;
    that suffers under probat...
  • M,--but then there is no consonancy in the sequel;
    that suffers under probation A should follow but O does.
  • Fabian. Did not I say he would work it out? the cur is
    excellent at faults.

    Malvolio. M,--but then there is no consonancy in the sequel;
    that suffers under probation A should follow but O does.

40 II / 5
  • And then I comes behind.
  • And then I comes behind.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Ay, or I'll cudgel him, and make him cry O!

    Malvolio. And then I comes behind.

41 II / 5
  • M, O, A, I; this simulation is not as the former: and
    yet, to crush this a l...
  • M, O, A, I; this simulation is not as the former: and
    yet, to crush this a little, it would bow to me, for
    every one of these letters are in my name. Soft!
    here follows prose.
    [Reads]
    'If this fall into thy hand, revolve. In my stars I
    am above thee; but be not afraid of greatness: some
    are born great, some achieve greatness, and some
    have greatness thrust upon 'em. Thy Fates open
    their hands; let thy blood and spirit embrace them;
    and, to inure thyself to what thou art like to be,
    cast thy humble slough and appear fresh. Be
    opposite with a kinsman, surly with servants; let
    thy tongue tang arguments of state; put thyself into
    the trick of singularity: she thus advises thee
    that sighs for thee. Remember who commended thy
    yellow stockings, and wished to see thee ever
    cross-gartered: I say, remember. Go to, thou art
    made, if thou desirest to be so; if not, let me see
    thee a steward still, the fellow of servants, and
    not worthy to touch Fortune's fingers. Farewell.
    She that would alter services with thee,
    THE FORTUNATE-UNHAPPY.'
    Daylight and champaign discovers not more: this is
    open. I will be proud, I will read politic authors,
    I will baffle Sir Toby, I will wash off gross
    acquaintance, I will be point-devise the very man.
    I do not now fool myself, to let imagination jade
    me; for every reason excites to this, that my lady
    loves me. She did commend my yellow stockings of
    late, she did praise my leg being cross-gartered;
    and in this she manifests herself to my love, and
    with a kind of injunction drives me to these habits
    of her liking. I thank my stars I am happy. I will
    be strange, stout, in yellow stockings, and
    cross-gartered, even with the swiftness of putting
    on. Jove and my stars be praised! Here is yet a
    postscript.
    [Reads]
    'Thou canst not choose but know who I am. If thou
    entertainest my love, let it appear in thy smiling;
    thy smiles become thee well; therefore in my
    presence still smile, dear my sweet, I prithee.'
    Jove, I thank thee: I will smile; I will do
    everything that thou wilt have me.
  • Fabian. Ay, an you had any eye behind you, you might see
    more detraction at your heels than fortunes before
    you.

    Malvolio. M, O, A, I; this simulation is not as the former: and
    yet, to crush this a little, it would bow to me, for
    every one of these letters are in my name. Soft!
    here follows prose.
    [Reads]
    'If this fall into thy hand, revolve. In my stars I
    am above thee; but be not afraid of greatness: some
    are born great, some achieve greatness, and some
    have greatness thrust upon 'em. Thy Fates open
    their hands; let thy blood and spirit embrace them;
    and, to inure thyself to what thou art like to be,
    cast thy humble slough and appear fresh. Be
    opposite with a kinsman, surly with servants; let
    thy tongue tang arguments of state; put thyself into
    the trick of singularity: she thus advises thee
    that sighs for thee. Remember who commended thy
    yellow stockings, and wished to see thee ever
    cross-gartered: I say, remember. Go to, thou art
    made, if thou desirest to be so; if not, let me see
    thee a steward still, the fellow of servants, and
    not worthy to touch Fortune's fingers. Farewell.
    She that would alter services with thee,
    THE FORTUNATE-UNHAPPY.'
    Daylight and champaign discovers not more: this is
    open. I will be proud, I will read politic authors,
    I will baffle Sir Toby, I will wash off gross
    acquaintance, I will be point-devise the very man.
    I do not now fool myself, to let imagination jade
    me; for every reason excites to this, that my lady
    loves me. She did commend my yellow stockings of
    late, she did praise my leg being cross-gartered;
    and in this she manifests herself to my love, and
    with a kind of injunction drives me to these habits
    of her liking. I thank my stars I am happy. I will
    be strange, stout, in yellow stockings, and
    cross-gartered, even with the swiftness of putting
    on. Jove and my stars be praised! Here is yet a
    postscript.
    [Reads]
    'Thou canst not choose but know who I am. If thou
    entertainest my love, let it appear in thy smiling;
    thy smiles become thee well; therefore in my
    presence still smile, dear my sweet, I prithee.'
    Jove, I thank thee: I will smile; I will do
    everything that thou wilt have me.

42 III / 4
  • Sweet lady, ho, ho.
  • Sweet lady, ho, ho.
  • Olivia. Go call him hither.
    [Exit MARIA]
    I am as mad as he,
    If sad and merry madness equal be.
    [Re-enter MARIA, with MALVOLIO]
    How now, Malvolio!

    Malvolio. Sweet lady, ho, ho.

43 III / 4
  • Sad, lady! I could be sad: this does make some
    obstruction in the blood, thi...
  • Sad, lady! I could be sad: this does make some
    obstruction in the blood, this cross-gartering; but
    what of that? if it please the eye of one, it is
    with me as the very true sonnet is, 'Please one, and
    please all.'
  • Olivia. Smilest thou?
    I sent for thee upon a sad occasion.

    Malvolio. Sad, lady! I could be sad: this does make some
    obstruction in the blood, this cross-gartering; but
    what of that? if it please the eye of one, it is
    with me as the very true sonnet is, 'Please one, and
    please all.'

44 III / 4
  • Not black in my mind, though yellow in my legs. It
    did come to his hands, an...
  • Not black in my mind, though yellow in my legs. It
    did come to his hands, and commands shall be
    executed: I think we do know the sweet Roman hand.
  • Olivia. Why, how dost thou, man? what is the matter with thee?

    Malvolio. Not black in my mind, though yellow in my legs. It
    did come to his hands, and commands shall be
    executed: I think we do know the sweet Roman hand.

45 III / 4
  • To bed! ay, sweet-heart, and I'll come to thee.
  • To bed! ay, sweet-heart, and I'll come to thee.
  • Olivia. Wilt thou go to bed, Malvolio?

    Malvolio. To bed! ay, sweet-heart, and I'll come to thee.

46 III / 4
  • At your request! yes; nightingales answer daws.
  • At your request! yes; nightingales answer daws.
  • Maria. How do you, Malvolio?

    Malvolio. At your request! yes; nightingales answer daws.

47 III / 4
  • 'Be not afraid of greatness:' 'twas well writ.
  • 'Be not afraid of greatness:' 'twas well writ.
  • Maria. Why appear you with this ridiculous boldness before my lady?

    Malvolio. 'Be not afraid of greatness:' 'twas well writ.

48 III / 4
  • 'Some are born great,'--
  • 'Some are born great,'--
  • Olivia. What meanest thou by that, Malvolio?

    Malvolio. 'Some are born great,'--

49 III / 4
  • 'Some achieve greatness,'--
  • 'Some achieve greatness,'--
  • Olivia. Ha!

    Malvolio. 'Some achieve greatness,'--

50 III / 4
  • 'And some have greatness thrust upon them.'
  • 'And some have greatness thrust upon them.'
  • Olivia. What sayest thou?

    Malvolio. 'And some have greatness thrust upon them.'

51 III / 4
  • 'Remember who commended thy yellow stockings,'--
  • 'Remember who commended thy yellow stockings,'--
  • Olivia. Heaven restore thee!

    Malvolio. 'Remember who commended thy yellow stockings,'--

52 III / 4
  • 'And wished to see thee cross-gartered.'
  • 'And wished to see thee cross-gartered.'
  • Olivia. Thy yellow stockings!

    Malvolio. 'And wished to see thee cross-gartered.'

53 III / 4
  • 'Go to thou art made, if thou desirest to be so;'--
  • 'Go to thou art made, if thou desirest to be so;'--
  • Olivia. Cross-gartered!

    Malvolio. 'Go to thou art made, if thou desirest to be so;'--

54 III / 4
  • 'If not, let me see thee a servant still.'
  • 'If not, let me see thee a servant still.'
  • Olivia. Am I made?

    Malvolio. 'If not, let me see thee a servant still.'

55 III / 4
  • O, ho! do you come near me now? no worse man than
    Sir Toby to look to me! Th...
  • O, ho! do you come near me now? no worse man than
    Sir Toby to look to me! This concurs directly with
    the letter: she sends him on purpose, that I may
    appear stubborn to him; for she incites me to that
    in the letter. 'Cast thy humble slough,' says she;
    'be opposite with a kinsman, surly with servants;
    let thy tongue tang with arguments of state; put
    thyself into the trick of singularity;' and
    consequently sets down the manner how; as, a sad
    face, a reverend carriage, a slow tongue, in the
    habit of some sir of note, and so forth. I have
    limed her; but it is Jove's doing, and Jove make me
    thankful! And when she went away now, 'Let this
    fellow be looked to:' fellow! not Malvolio, nor
    after my degree, but fellow. Why, every thing
    adheres together, that no dram of a scruple, no
    scruple of a scruple, no obstacle, no incredulous
    or unsafe circumstance--What can be said? Nothing
    that can be can come between me and the full
    prospect of my hopes. Well, Jove, not I, is the
    doer of this, and he is to be thanked.
  • Olivia. I'll come to him.
    [Exit Servant]
    Good Maria, let this fellow be looked to. Where's
    my cousin Toby? Let some of my people have a special
    care of him: I would not have him miscarry for the
    half of my dowry.

    Malvolio. O, ho! do you come near me now? no worse man than
    Sir Toby to look to me! This concurs directly with
    the letter: she sends him on purpose, that I may
    appear stubborn to him; for she incites me to that
    in the letter. 'Cast thy humble slough,' says she;
    'be opposite with a kinsman, surly with servants;
    let thy tongue tang with arguments of state; put
    thyself into the trick of singularity;' and
    consequently sets down the manner how; as, a sad
    face, a reverend carriage, a slow tongue, in the
    habit of some sir of note, and so forth. I have
    limed her; but it is Jove's doing, and Jove make me
    thankful! And when she went away now, 'Let this
    fellow be looked to:' fellow! not Malvolio, nor
    after my degree, but fellow. Why, every thing
    adheres together, that no dram of a scruple, no
    scruple of a scruple, no obstacle, no incredulous
    or unsafe circumstance--What can be said? Nothing
    that can be can come between me and the full
    prospect of my hopes. Well, Jove, not I, is the
    doer of this, and he is to be thanked.

56 III / 4
  • Go off; I discard you: let me enjoy my private: go
    off.
  • Go off; I discard you: let me enjoy my private: go
    off.
  • Fabian. Here he is, here he is. How is't with you, sir?
    how is't with you, man?

    Malvolio. Go off; I discard you: let me enjoy my private: go
    off.

57 III / 4
  • Ah, ha! does she so?
  • Ah, ha! does she so?
  • Maria. Lo, how hollow the fiend speaks within him! did not
    I tell you? Sir Toby, my lady prays you to have a
    care of him.

    Malvolio. Ah, ha! does she so?

58 III / 4
  • Do you know what you say?
  • Do you know what you say?
  • Sir Toby Belch. Go to, go to; peace, peace; we must deal gently
    with him: let me alone. How do you, Malvolio? how
    is't with you? What, man! defy the devil:
    consider, he's an enemy to mankind.

    Malvolio. Do you know what you say?

59 III / 4
  • How now, mistress!
  • How now, mistress!
  • Maria. Marry, and it shall be done to-morrow morning, if I
    live. My lady would not lose him for more than I'll say.

    Malvolio. How now, mistress!

60 III / 4
  • Sir!
  • Sir!
  • Sir Toby Belch. Why, how now, my bawcock! how dost thou, chuck?

    Malvolio. Sir!

61 III / 4
  • My prayers, minx!
  • My prayers, minx!
  • Maria. Get him to say his prayers, good Sir Toby, get him to pray.

    Malvolio. My prayers, minx!

62 III / 4
  • Go, hang yourselves all! you are idle shallow
    things: I am not of your eleme...
  • Go, hang yourselves all! you are idle shallow
    things: I am not of your element: you shall know
    more hereafter.
  • Maria. No, I warrant you, he will not hear of godliness.

    Malvolio. Go, hang yourselves all! you are idle shallow
    things: I am not of your element: you shall know
    more hereafter.

63 IV / 2
  • [Within] Who calls there?
  • [Within] Who calls there?
  • Sir Toby Belch. The knave counterfeits well; a good knave.

    Malvolio. [Within] Who calls there?

64 IV / 2
  • Sir Topas, Sir Topas, good Sir Topas, go to my lady.
  • Sir Topas, Sir Topas, good Sir Topas, go to my lady.
  • Feste. Sir Topas the curate, who comes to visit Malvolio
    the lunatic.

    Malvolio. Sir Topas, Sir Topas, good Sir Topas, go to my lady.

65 IV / 2
  • Sir Topas, never was man thus wronged: good Sir
    Topas, do not think I am mad...
  • Sir Topas, never was man thus wronged: good Sir
    Topas, do not think I am mad: they have laid me
    here in hideous darkness.
  • Sir Toby Belch. Well said, Master Parson.

    Malvolio. Sir Topas, never was man thus wronged: good Sir
    Topas, do not think I am mad: they have laid me
    here in hideous darkness.

66 IV / 2
  • As hell, Sir Topas.
  • As hell, Sir Topas.
  • Feste. Fie, thou dishonest Satan! I call thee by the most
    modest terms; for I am one of those gentle ones
    that will use the devil himself with courtesy:
    sayest thou that house is dark?

    Malvolio. As hell, Sir Topas.

67 IV / 2
  • I am not mad, Sir Topas: I say to you, this house is dark.
  • I am not mad, Sir Topas: I say to you, this house is dark.
  • Feste. Why it hath bay windows transparent as barricadoes,
    and the clearstores toward the south north are as
    lustrous as ebony; and yet complainest thou of
    obstruction?

    Malvolio. I am not mad, Sir Topas: I say to you, this house is dark.

68 IV / 2
  • I say, this house is as dark as ignorance, though
    ignorance were as dark as...
  • I say, this house is as dark as ignorance, though
    ignorance were as dark as hell; and I say, there
    was never man thus abused. I am no more mad than you
    are: make the trial of it in any constant question.
  • Feste. Madman, thou errest: I say, there is no darkness
    but ignorance; in which thou art more puzzled than
    the Egyptians in their fog.

    Malvolio. I say, this house is as dark as ignorance, though
    ignorance were as dark as hell; and I say, there
    was never man thus abused. I am no more mad than you
    are: make the trial of it in any constant question.

69 IV / 2
  • That the soul of our grandam might haply inhabit a bird.
  • That the soul of our grandam might haply inhabit a bird.
  • Feste. What is the opinion of Pythagoras concerning wild fowl?

    Malvolio. That the soul of our grandam might haply inhabit a bird.

70 IV / 2
  • I think nobly of the soul, and no way approve his opinion.
  • I think nobly of the soul, and no way approve his opinion.
  • Feste. What thinkest thou of his opinion?

    Malvolio. I think nobly of the soul, and no way approve his opinion.

71 IV / 2
  • Sir Topas, Sir Topas!
  • Sir Topas, Sir Topas!
  • Feste. Fare thee well. Remain thou still in darkness:
    thou shalt hold the opinion of Pythagoras ere I will
    allow of thy wits, and fear to kill a woodcock, lest
    thou dispossess the soul of thy grandam. Fare thee well.

    Malvolio. Sir Topas, Sir Topas!

72 IV / 2
  • Fool!
  • Fool!
  • Feste. [Singing]
    'Hey, Robin, jolly Robin,
    Tell me how thy lady does.'

    Malvolio. Fool!

73 IV / 2
  • Fool!
  • Fool!
  • Feste. 'My lady is unkind, perdy.'

    Malvolio. Fool!

74 IV / 2
  • Fool, I say!
  • Fool, I say!
  • Feste. 'Alas, why is she so?'

    Malvolio. Fool, I say!

75 IV / 2
  • Good fool, as ever thou wilt deserve well at my
    hand, help me to a candle, a...
  • Good fool, as ever thou wilt deserve well at my
    hand, help me to a candle, and pen, ink and paper:
    as I am a gentleman, I will live to be thankful to
    thee for't.
  • Feste. 'She loves another'--Who calls, ha?

    Malvolio. Good fool, as ever thou wilt deserve well at my
    hand, help me to a candle, and pen, ink and paper:
    as I am a gentleman, I will live to be thankful to
    thee for't.

76 IV / 2
  • Ay, good fool.
  • Ay, good fool.
  • Feste. Master Malvolio?

    Malvolio. Ay, good fool.

77 IV / 2
  • Fool, there was never a man so notoriously abused: I
    am as well in my wits,...
  • Fool, there was never a man so notoriously abused: I
    am as well in my wits, fool, as thou art.
  • Feste. Alas, sir, how fell you besides your five wits?

    Malvolio. Fool, there was never a man so notoriously abused: I
    am as well in my wits, fool, as thou art.

78 IV / 2
  • They have here propertied me; keep me in darkness,
    send ministers to me, ass...
  • They have here propertied me; keep me in darkness,
    send ministers to me, asses, and do all they can to
    face me out of my wits.
  • Feste. But as well? then you are mad indeed, if you be no
    better in your wits than a fool.

    Malvolio. They have here propertied me; keep me in darkness,
    send ministers to me, asses, and do all they can to
    face me out of my wits.

79 IV / 2
  • Sir Topas!
  • Sir Topas!
  • Feste. Advise you what you say; the minister is here.
    Malvolio, Malvolio, thy wits the heavens restore!
    endeavour thyself to sleep, and leave thy vain
    bibble babble.

    Malvolio. Sir Topas!

80 IV / 2
  • Fool, fool, fool, I say!
  • Fool, fool, fool, I say!
  • Feste. Maintain no words with him, good fellow. Who, I,
    sir? not I, sir. God be wi' you, good Sir Topas.
    Merry, amen. I will, sir, I will.

    Malvolio. Fool, fool, fool, I say!

81 IV / 2
  • Good fool, help me to some light and some paper: I
    tell thee, I am as well i...
  • Good fool, help me to some light and some paper: I
    tell thee, I am as well in my wits as any man in Illyria.
  • Feste. Alas, sir, be patient. What say you sir? I am
    shent for speaking to you.

    Malvolio. Good fool, help me to some light and some paper: I
    tell thee, I am as well in my wits as any man in Illyria.

82 IV / 2
  • By this hand, I am. Good fool, some ink, paper and
    light; and convey what I...
  • By this hand, I am. Good fool, some ink, paper and
    light; and convey what I will set down to my lady:
    it shall advantage thee more than ever the bearing
    of letter did.
  • Feste. Well-a-day that you were, sir

    Malvolio. By this hand, I am. Good fool, some ink, paper and
    light; and convey what I will set down to my lady:
    it shall advantage thee more than ever the bearing
    of letter did.

83 IV / 2
  • Believe me, I am not; I tell thee true.
  • Believe me, I am not; I tell thee true.
  • Feste. I will help you to't. But tell me true, are you
    not mad indeed? or do you but counterfeit?

    Malvolio. Believe me, I am not; I tell thee true.

84 IV / 2
  • Fool, I'll requite it in the highest degree: I
    prithee, be gone.
  • Fool, I'll requite it in the highest degree: I
    prithee, be gone.
  • Feste. Nay, I'll ne'er believe a madman till I see his
    brains. I will fetch you light and paper and ink.

    Malvolio. Fool, I'll requite it in the highest degree: I
    prithee, be gone.

85 V / 1
  • Madam, you have done me wrong,
    Notorious wrong.
  • Madam, you have done me wrong,
    Notorious wrong.
  • Olivia. Ay, my lord, this same.
    How now, Malvolio!

    Malvolio. Madam, you have done me wrong,
    Notorious wrong.

86 V / 1
  • Lady, you have. Pray you, peruse that letter.
    You must not now deny it is yo...
  • Lady, you have. Pray you, peruse that letter.
    You must not now deny it is your hand:
    Write from it, if you can, in hand or phrase;
    Or say 'tis not your seal, nor your invention:
    You can say none of this: well, grant it then
    And tell me, in the modesty of honour,
    Why you have given me such clear lights of favour,
    Bade me come smiling and cross-garter'd to you,
    To put on yellow stockings and to frown
    Upon Sir Toby and the lighter people;
    And, acting this in an obedient hope,
    Why have you suffer'd me to be imprison'd,
    Kept in a dark house, visited by the priest,
    And made the most notorious geck and gull
    That e'er invention play'd on? tell me why.
  • Olivia. Have I, Malvolio? no.

    Malvolio. Lady, you have. Pray you, peruse that letter.
    You must not now deny it is your hand:
    Write from it, if you can, in hand or phrase;
    Or say 'tis not your seal, nor your invention:
    You can say none of this: well, grant it then
    And tell me, in the modesty of honour,
    Why you have given me such clear lights of favour,
    Bade me come smiling and cross-garter'd to you,
    To put on yellow stockings and to frown
    Upon Sir Toby and the lighter people;
    And, acting this in an obedient hope,
    Why have you suffer'd me to be imprison'd,
    Kept in a dark house, visited by the priest,
    And made the most notorious geck and gull
    That e'er invention play'd on? tell me why.

87 V / 1
  • I'll be revenged on the whole pack of you.
  • I'll be revenged on the whole pack of you.
  • Feste. Why, 'some are born great, some achieve greatness,
    and some have greatness thrown upon them.' I was
    one, sir, in this interlude; one Sir Topas, sir; but
    that's all one. 'By the Lord, fool, I am not mad.'
    But do you remember? 'Madam, why laugh you at such
    a barren rascal? an you smile not, he's gagged:'
    and thus the whirligig of time brings in his revenges.

    Malvolio. I'll be revenged on the whole pack of you.

© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.