Speeches (Lines) for Marquess of Montague in "History of Henry VI, Part III"

Total: 15
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 1
  • And, brother, here's the Earl of Wiltshire's blood,
    Whom I encounter'd as th...
  • And, brother, here's the Earl of Wiltshire's blood,
    Whom I encounter'd as the battles join'd.
  • King Edward IV (Plantagenet). Lord Stafford's father, Duke of Buckingham,
    Is either slain or wounded dangerously;
    I cleft his beaver with a downright blow:
    That this is true, father, behold his blood.

    Marquess of Montague. And, brother, here's the Earl of Wiltshire's blood,
    Whom I encounter'd as the battles join'd.

2 I / 1
  • Good brother, as thou lovest and honourest arms,
    Let's fight it out and not...
  • Good brother, as thou lovest and honourest arms,
    Let's fight it out and not stand cavilling thus.
  • King Edward IV (Plantagenet). Sweet father, do so; set it on your head.

    Marquess of Montague. Good brother, as thou lovest and honourest arms,
    Let's fight it out and not stand cavilling thus.

3 I / 1
  • And I unto the sea from whence I came.
    [Exeunt YORK, EDWARD, EDMUND, GEORGE,...
  • And I unto the sea from whence I came.
    [Exeunt YORK, EDWARD, EDMUND, GEORGE, RICHARD,]
    WARWICK, NORFOLK, MONTAGUE, their Soldiers, and
    Attendants]
  • Duke of Norfolk. And I to Norfolk with my followers.

    Marquess of Montague. And I unto the sea from whence I came.
    [Exeunt YORK, EDWARD, EDMUND, GEORGE, RICHARD,]
    WARWICK, NORFOLK, MONTAGUE, their Soldiers, and
    Attendants]

4 I / 2
  • But I have reasons strong and forcible.
  • But I have reasons strong and forcible.
  • King Edward IV (Plantagenet). No, I can better play the orator.

    Marquess of Montague. But I have reasons strong and forcible.

5 I / 2
  • Brother, I go; I'll win them, fear it not:
    And thus most humbly I do take my...
  • Brother, I go; I'll win them, fear it not:
    And thus most humbly I do take my leave.
    [Exit]
    [Enter JOHN MORTIMER and HUGH MORTIMER]
    Sir John and Sir Hugh Mortimer, mine uncles,
    You are come to Sandal in a happy hour;
    The army of the queen mean to besiege us.
  • Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Ay, with my sword. What! think'st thou that we fear them?
    Edward and Richard, you shall stay with me;
    My brother Montague shall post to London:
    Let noble Warwick, Cobham, and the rest,
    Whom we have left protectors of the king,
    With powerful policy strengthen themselves,
    And trust not simple Henry nor his oaths.

    Marquess of Montague. Brother, I go; I'll win them, fear it not:
    And thus most humbly I do take my leave.
    [Exit]
    [Enter JOHN MORTIMER and HUGH MORTIMER]
    Sir John and Sir Hugh Mortimer, mine uncles,
    You are come to Sandal in a happy hour;
    The army of the queen mean to besiege us.

6 IV / 1
  • Yet, to have join'd with France in such alliance
    Would more have strengthen'...
  • Yet, to have join'd with France in such alliance
    Would more have strengthen'd this our commonwealth
    'Gainst foreign storms than any home-bred marriage.
  • King Edward IV (Plantagenet). What if both Lewis and Warwick be appeased
    By such invention as I can devise?

    Marquess of Montague. Yet, to have join'd with France in such alliance
    Would more have strengthen'd this our commonwealth
    'Gainst foreign storms than any home-bred marriage.

7 IV / 1
  • But the safer when 'tis back'd with France.
  • But the safer when 'tis back'd with France.
  • Lord Hastings. Why, knows not Montague that of itself
    England is safe, if true within itself?

    Marquess of Montague. But the safer when 'tis back'd with France.

8 IV / 1
  • So God help Montague as he proves true!
  • So God help Montague as he proves true!
  • King Edward IV (Plantagenet). Clarence and Somerset both gone to Warwick!
    Yet am I arm'd against the worst can happen;
    And haste is needful in this desperate case.
    Pembroke and Stafford, you in our behalf
    Go levy men, and make prepare for war;
    They are already, or quickly will be landed:
    Myself in person will straight follow you.
    [Exeunt PEMBROKE and STAFFORD]
    But, ere I go, Hastings and Montague,
    Resolve my doubt. You twain, of all the rest,
    Are near to Warwick by blood and by alliance:
    Tell me if you love Warwick more than me?
    If it be so, then both depart to him;
    I rather wish you foes than hollow friends:
    But if you mind to hold your true obedience,
    Give me assurance with some friendly vow,
    That I may never have you in suspect.

    Marquess of Montague. So God help Montague as he proves true!

9 IV / 7
  • To help King Edward in his time of storm,
    As every loyal subject ought to do...
  • To help King Edward in his time of storm,
    As every loyal subject ought to do.
  • King Edward IV (Plantagenet). Welcome, Sir John! But why come you in arms?

    Marquess of Montague. To help King Edward in his time of storm,
    As every loyal subject ought to do.

10 IV / 7
  • Then fare you well, for I will hence again:
    I came to serve a king and not a...
  • Then fare you well, for I will hence again:
    I came to serve a king and not a duke.
    Drummer, strike up, and let us march away.
  • King Edward IV (Plantagenet). Thanks, good Montgomery; but we now forget
    Our title to the crown and only claim
    Our dukedom till God please to send the rest.

    Marquess of Montague. Then fare you well, for I will hence again:
    I came to serve a king and not a duke.
    Drummer, strike up, and let us march away.

11 IV / 7
  • What talk you of debating? in few words,
    If you'll not here proclaim yoursel...
  • What talk you of debating? in few words,
    If you'll not here proclaim yourself our king,
    I'll leave you to your fortune and be gone
    To keep them back that come to succor you:
    Why shall we fight, if you pretend no title?
  • King Edward IV (Plantagenet). Nay, stay, Sir John, awhile, and we'll debate
    By what safe means the crown may be recover'd.

    Marquess of Montague. What talk you of debating? in few words,
    If you'll not here proclaim yourself our king,
    I'll leave you to your fortune and be gone
    To keep them back that come to succor you:
    Why shall we fight, if you pretend no title?

12 IV / 7
  • Ay, now my sovereign speaketh like himself;
    And now will I be Edward's champ...
  • Ay, now my sovereign speaketh like himself;
    And now will I be Edward's champion.
  • King Edward IV (Plantagenet). Then be it as you will; for 'tis my right,
    And Henry but usurps the diadem.

    Marquess of Montague. Ay, now my sovereign speaketh like himself;
    And now will I be Edward's champion.

13 IV / 7
  • And whosoe'er gainsays King Edward's right,
    By this I challenge him to singl...
  • And whosoe'er gainsays King Edward's right,
    By this I challenge him to single fight.
  • Soldier. Edward the Fourth, by the grace of God, king of
    England and France, and lord of Ireland, &c.

    Marquess of Montague. And whosoe'er gainsays King Edward's right,
    By this I challenge him to single fight.

14 IV / 8
  • Comfort, my lord; and so I take my leave.
  • Comfort, my lord; and so I take my leave.
  • Henry VI. Well-minded Clarence, be thou fortunate!

    Marquess of Montague. Comfort, my lord; and so I take my leave.

15 V / 1
  • Montague, Montague, for Lancaster!
  • Montague, Montague, for Lancaster!
  • Earl of Warwick. O, welcome, Oxford! for we want thy help.

    Marquess of Montague. Montague, Montague, for Lancaster!

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.