Speeches (Lines) for Messenger in "Antony and Cleopatra"

Total: 42
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 2
  • Fulvia thy wife first came into the field.
  • Fulvia thy wife first came into the field.
  • CLEOPATRA. We will not look upon him: go with us.

    Messenger. Fulvia thy wife first came into the field.

2 I / 2
  • Ay:
    But soon that war had end, and the time's state
    Made friends of them...
  • Ay:
    But soon that war had end, and the time's state
    Made friends of them, joining their force 'gainst Caesar;
    Whose better issue in the war, from Italy,
    Upon the first encounter, drave them.
  • ANTONY. Against my brother Lucius?

    Messenger. Ay:
    But soon that war had end, and the time's state
    Made friends of them, joining their force 'gainst Caesar;
    Whose better issue in the war, from Italy,
    Upon the first encounter, drave them.

3 I / 2
  • The nature of bad news infects the teller.
  • The nature of bad news infects the teller.
  • ANTONY. Well, what worst?

    Messenger. The nature of bad news infects the teller.

4 I / 2
  • Labienus--
    This is stiff news--hath, with his Parthian force,
    Extended A...
  • Labienus--
    This is stiff news--hath, with his Parthian force,
    Extended Asia from Euphrates;
    His conquering banner shook from Syria
    To Lydia and to Ionia; Whilst--
  • ANTONY. When it concerns the fool or coward. On:
    Things that are past are done with me. 'Tis thus:
    Who tells me true, though in his tale lie death,
    I hear him as he flatter'd.

    Messenger. Labienus--
    This is stiff news--hath, with his Parthian force,
    Extended Asia from Euphrates;
    His conquering banner shook from Syria
    To Lydia and to Ionia; Whilst--

5 I / 2
  • O, my lord!
  • O, my lord!
  • ANTONY. Antony, thou wouldst say,--

    Messenger. O, my lord!

6 I / 2
  • At your noble pleasure.
  • At your noble pleasure.
  • ANTONY. Speak to me home, mince not the general tongue:
    Name Cleopatra as she is call'd in Rome;
    Rail thou in Fulvia's phrase; and taunt my faults
    With such full licence as both truth and malice
    Have power to utter. O, then we bring forth weeds,
    When our quick minds lie still; and our ills told us
    Is as our earing. Fare thee well awhile.

    Messenger. At your noble pleasure.

7 I / 4
  • Thy biddings have been done; and every hour,
    Most noble Caesar, shalt thou h...
  • Thy biddings have been done; and every hour,
    Most noble Caesar, shalt thou have report
    How 'tis abroad. Pompey is strong at sea;
    And it appears he is beloved of those
    That only have fear'd Caesar: to the ports
    The discontents repair, and men's reports
    Give him much wrong'd.
  • LEPIDUS. Here's more news.

    Messenger. Thy biddings have been done; and every hour,
    Most noble Caesar, shalt thou have report
    How 'tis abroad. Pompey is strong at sea;
    And it appears he is beloved of those
    That only have fear'd Caesar: to the ports
    The discontents repair, and men's reports
    Give him much wrong'd.

8 I / 4
  • Caesar, I bring thee word,
    Menecrates and Menas, famous pirates,
    Make th...
  • Caesar, I bring thee word,
    Menecrates and Menas, famous pirates,
    Make the sea serve them, which they ear and wound
    With keels of every kind: many hot inroads
    They make in Italy; the borders maritime
    Lack blood to think on't, and flush youth revolt:
    No vessel can peep forth, but 'tis as soon
    Taken as seen; for Pompey's name strikes more
    Than could his war resisted.
  • OCTAVIUS. I should have known no less.
    It hath been taught us from the primal state,
    That he which is was wish'd until he were;
    And the ebb'd man, ne'er loved till ne'er worth love,
    Comes dear'd by being lack'd. This common body,
    Like to a vagabond flag upon the stream,
    Goes to and back, lackeying the varying tide,
    To rot itself with motion.

    Messenger. Caesar, I bring thee word,
    Menecrates and Menas, famous pirates,
    Make the sea serve them, which they ear and wound
    With keels of every kind: many hot inroads
    They make in Italy; the borders maritime
    Lack blood to think on't, and flush youth revolt:
    No vessel can peep forth, but 'tis as soon
    Taken as seen; for Pompey's name strikes more
    Than could his war resisted.

9 II / 5
  • Madam, madam,--
  • Madam, madam,--
  • CLEOPATRA. That time,--O times!--
    I laugh'd him out of patience; and that night
    I laugh'd him into patience; and next morn,
    Ere the ninth hour, I drunk him to his bed;
    Then put my tires and mantles on him, whilst
    I wore his sword Philippan.
    [Enter a Messenger]
    O, from Italy
    Ram thou thy fruitful tidings in mine ears,
    That long time have been barren.

    Messenger. Madam, madam,--

10 II / 5
  • First, madam, he is well.
  • First, madam, he is well.
  • CLEOPATRA. Antonius dead!--If thou say so, villain,
    Thou kill'st thy mistress: but well and free,
    If thou so yield him, there is gold, and here
    My bluest veins to kiss; a hand that kings
    Have lipp'd, and trembled kissing.

    Messenger. First, madam, he is well.

11 II / 5
  • Good madam, hear me.
  • Good madam, hear me.
  • CLEOPATRA. Why, there's more gold.
    But, sirrah, mark, we use
    To say the dead are well: bring it to that,
    The gold I give thee will I melt and pour
    Down thy ill-uttering throat.

    Messenger. Good madam, hear me.

12 II / 5
  • Will't please you hear me?
  • Will't please you hear me?
  • CLEOPATRA. Well, go to, I will;
    But there's no goodness in thy face: if Antony
    Be free and healthful,--so tart a favour
    To trumpet such good tidings! If not well,
    Thou shouldst come like a Fury crown'd with snakes,
    Not like a formal man.

    Messenger. Will't please you hear me?

13 II / 5
  • Madam, he's well.
  • Madam, he's well.
  • CLEOPATRA. I have a mind to strike thee ere thou speak'st:
    Yet if thou say Antony lives, is well,
    Or friends with Caesar, or not captive to him,
    I'll set thee in a shower of gold, and hail
    Rich pearls upon thee.

    Messenger. Madam, he's well.

14 II / 5
  • And friends with Caesar.
  • And friends with Caesar.
  • CLEOPATRA. Well said.

    Messenger. And friends with Caesar.

15 II / 5
  • Caesar and he are greater friends than ever.
  • Caesar and he are greater friends than ever.
  • CLEOPATRA. Thou'rt an honest man.

    Messenger. Caesar and he are greater friends than ever.

16 II / 5
  • But yet, madam,--
  • But yet, madam,--
  • CLEOPATRA. Make thee a fortune from me.

    Messenger. But yet, madam,--

17 II / 5
  • Free, madam! no; I made no such report:
    He's bound unto Octavia.
  • Free, madam! no; I made no such report:
    He's bound unto Octavia.
  • CLEOPATRA. I do not like 'But yet,' it does allay
    The good precedence; fie upon 'But yet'!
    'But yet' is as a gaoler to bring forth
    Some monstrous malefactor. Prithee, friend,
    Pour out the pack of matter to mine ear,
    The good and bad together: he's friends with Caesar:
    In state of health thou say'st; and thou say'st free.

    Messenger. Free, madam! no; I made no such report:
    He's bound unto Octavia.

18 II / 5
  • For the best turn i' the bed.
  • For the best turn i' the bed.
  • CLEOPATRA. For what good turn?

    Messenger. For the best turn i' the bed.

19 II / 5
  • Madam, he's married to Octavia.
  • Madam, he's married to Octavia.
  • CLEOPATRA. I am pale, Charmian.

    Messenger. Madam, he's married to Octavia.

20 II / 5
  • Good madam, patience.
  • Good madam, patience.
  • CLEOPATRA. The most infectious pestilence upon thee!

    Messenger. Good madam, patience.

21 II / 5
  • Gracious madam,
    I that do bring the news made not the match.
  • Gracious madam,
    I that do bring the news made not the match.
  • CLEOPATRA. What say you? Hence,
    [Strikes him again]
    Horrible villain! or I'll spurn thine eyes
    Like balls before me; I'll unhair thy head:
    [She hales him up and down]
    Thou shalt be whipp'd with wire, and stew'd in brine,
    Smarting in lingering pickle.

    Messenger. Gracious madam,
    I that do bring the news made not the match.

22 II / 5
  • He's married, madam.
  • He's married, madam.
  • CLEOPATRA. Say 'tis not so, a province I will give thee,
    And make thy fortunes proud: the blow thou hadst
    Shall make thy peace for moving me to rage;
    And I will boot thee with what gift beside
    Thy modesty can beg.

    Messenger. He's married, madam.

23 II / 5
  • Nay, then I'll run.
    What mean you, madam? I have made no fault.
  • Nay, then I'll run.
    What mean you, madam? I have made no fault.
  • CLEOPATRA. Rogue, thou hast lived too long.

    Messenger. Nay, then I'll run.
    What mean you, madam? I have made no fault.

24 II / 5
  • I have done my duty.
  • I have done my duty.
  • CLEOPATRA. I will not hurt him.
    [Exit CHARMIAN]
    These hands do lack nobility, that they strike
    A meaner than myself; since I myself
    Have given myself the cause.
    [Re-enter CHARMIAN and Messenger]
    Come hither, sir.
    Though it be honest, it is never good
    To bring bad news: give to a gracious message.
    An host of tongues; but let ill tidings tell
    Themselves when they be felt.

    Messenger. I have done my duty.

25 II / 5
  • He's married, madam.
  • He's married, madam.
  • CLEOPATRA. Is he married?
    I cannot hate thee worser than I do,
    If thou again say 'Yes.'

    Messenger. He's married, madam.

26 II / 5
  • Should I lie, madam?
  • Should I lie, madam?
  • CLEOPATRA. The gods confound thee! dost thou hold there still?

    Messenger. Should I lie, madam?

27 II / 5
  • I crave your highness' pardon.
  • I crave your highness' pardon.
  • CLEOPATRA. O, I would thou didst,
    So half my Egypt were submerged and made
    A cistern for scaled snakes! Go, get thee hence:
    Hadst thou Narcissus in thy face, to me
    Thou wouldst appear most ugly. He is married?

    Messenger. I crave your highness' pardon.

28 II / 5
  • Take no offence that I would not offend you:
    To punish me for what you make...
  • Take no offence that I would not offend you:
    To punish me for what you make me do.
    Seems much unequal: he's married to Octavia.
  • CLEOPATRA. He is married?

    Messenger. Take no offence that I would not offend you:
    To punish me for what you make me do.
    Seems much unequal: he's married to Octavia.

29 III / 3
  • Most gracious majesty,--
  • Most gracious majesty,--
  • CLEOPATRA. That Herod's head
    I'll have: but how, when Antony is gone
    Through whom I might command it? Come thou near.

    Messenger. Most gracious majesty,--

30 III / 3
  • Ay, dread queen.
  • Ay, dread queen.
  • CLEOPATRA. Didst thou behold Octavia?

    Messenger. Ay, dread queen.

31 III / 3
  • Madam, in Rome;
    I look'd her in the face, and saw her led
    Between her br...
  • Madam, in Rome;
    I look'd her in the face, and saw her led
    Between her brother and Mark Antony.
  • CLEOPATRA. Where?

    Messenger. Madam, in Rome;
    I look'd her in the face, and saw her led
    Between her brother and Mark Antony.

32 III / 3
  • She is not, madam.
  • She is not, madam.
  • CLEOPATRA. Is she as tall as me?

    Messenger. She is not, madam.

33 III / 3
  • Madam, I heard her speak; she is low-voiced.
  • Madam, I heard her speak; she is low-voiced.
  • CLEOPATRA. Didst hear her speak? is she shrill-tongued or low?

    Messenger. Madam, I heard her speak; she is low-voiced.

34 III / 3
  • She creeps:
    Her motion and her station are as one;
    She shows a body rath...
  • She creeps:
    Her motion and her station are as one;
    She shows a body rather than a life,
    A statue than a breather.
  • CLEOPATRA. I think so, Charmian: dull of tongue, and dwarfish!
    What majesty is in her gait? Remember,
    If e'er thou look'dst on majesty.

    Messenger. She creeps:
    Her motion and her station are as one;
    She shows a body rather than a life,
    A statue than a breather.

35 III / 3
  • Or I have no observance.
  • Or I have no observance.
  • CLEOPATRA. Is this certain?

    Messenger. Or I have no observance.

36 III / 3
  • Madam,
    She was a widow,--
  • Madam,
    She was a widow,--
  • CLEOPATRA. Guess at her years, I prithee.

    Messenger. Madam,
    She was a widow,--

37 III / 3
  • And I do think she's thirty.
  • And I do think she's thirty.
  • CLEOPATRA. Widow! Charmian, hark.

    Messenger. And I do think she's thirty.

38 III / 3
  • Round even to faultiness.
  • Round even to faultiness.
  • CLEOPATRA. Bear'st thou her face in mind? is't long or round?

    Messenger. Round even to faultiness.

39 III / 3
  • Brown, madam: and her forehead
    As low as she would wish it.
  • Brown, madam: and her forehead
    As low as she would wish it.
  • CLEOPATRA. For the most part, too, they are foolish that are so.
    Her hair, what colour?

    Messenger. Brown, madam: and her forehead
    As low as she would wish it.

40 III / 7
  • The news is true, my lord; he is descried;
    Caesar has taken Toryne.
  • The news is true, my lord; he is descried;
    Caesar has taken Toryne.
  • ANTONY. Our overplus of shipping will we burn;
    And, with the rest full-mann'd, from the head of Actium
    Beat the approaching Caesar. But if we fail,
    We then can do't at land.
    [Enter a Messenger]
    Thy business?

    Messenger. The news is true, my lord; he is descried;
    Caesar has taken Toryne.

41 III / 7
  • The emperor calls Canidius.
  • The emperor calls Canidius.
  • CANIDIUS. Well I know the man.

    Messenger. The emperor calls Canidius.

42 IV / 6
  • Antony
    Is come into the field.
  • Antony
    Is come into the field.
  • OCTAVIUS. The time of universal peace is near:
    Prove this a prosperous day, the three-nook'd world
    Shall bear the olive freely.

    Messenger. Antony
    Is come into the field.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.