Speeches (Lines) for Messenger in "History of Henry IV, Part I"

Total: 6
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 IV / 1
  • These letters come from your father.
  • These letters come from your father.
  • Hotspur (Henry Percy). Do so, and 'tis well.
    [Enter a Messenger with letters]
    What letters hast thou there?--I can but thank you.

    Messenger. These letters come from your father.

2 IV / 1
  • He cannot come, my lord; he is grievous sick.
  • He cannot come, my lord; he is grievous sick.
  • Hotspur (Henry Percy). Letters from him! why comes he not himself?

    Messenger. He cannot come, my lord; he is grievous sick.

3 IV / 1
  • His letters bear his mind, not I, my lord.
  • His letters bear his mind, not I, my lord.
  • Hotspur (Henry Percy). 'Zounds! how has he the leisure to be sick
    In such a rustling time? Who leads his power?
    Under whose government come they along?

    Messenger. His letters bear his mind, not I, my lord.

4 IV / 1
  • He did, my lord, four days ere I set forth;
    And at the time of my departure...
  • He did, my lord, four days ere I set forth;
    And at the time of my departure thence
    He was much fear'd by his physicians.
  • Earl of Worcester. I prithee, tell me, doth he keep his bed?

    Messenger. He did, my lord, four days ere I set forth;
    And at the time of my departure thence
    He was much fear'd by his physicians.

5 V / 2
  • My lord, here are letters for you.
  • My lord, here are letters for you.
  • Hotspur (Henry Percy). Cousin, I think thou art enamoured
    On his follies: never did I hear
    Of any prince so wild a libertine.
    But be he as he will, yet once ere night
    I will embrace him with a soldier's arm,
    That he shall shrink under my courtesy.
    Arm, arm with speed: and, fellows, soldiers, friends,
    Better consider what you have to do
    Than I, that have not well the gift of tongue,
    Can lift your blood up with persuasion.

    Messenger. My lord, here are letters for you.

6 V / 2
  • My lord, prepare; the king comes on apace.
  • My lord, prepare; the king comes on apace.
  • Hotspur (Henry Percy). I cannot read them now.
    O gentlemen, the time of life is short!
    To spend that shortness basely were too long,
    If life did ride upon a dial's point,
    Still ending at the arrival of an hour.
    An if we live, we live to tread on kings;
    If die, brave death, when princes die with us!
    Now, for our consciences, the arms are fair,
    When the intent of bearing them is just.

    Messenger. My lord, prepare; the king comes on apace.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.