Speeches (Lines) for Lord Mowbray in "History of Henry IV, Part II"

Total: 18
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 3
  • I well allow the occasion of our amis;
    But gladly would be better satisfied...
  • I well allow the occasion of our amis;
    But gladly would be better satisfied
    How, in our means, we should advance ourselves
    To look with forehead bold and big enough
    Upon the power and puissance of the King.
  • Archbishop Scroop. Thus have you heard our cause and known our means;
    And, my most noble friends, I pray you all
    Speak plainly your opinions of our hopes-
    And first, Lord Marshal, what say you to it?

    Lord Mowbray. I well allow the occasion of our amis;
    But gladly would be better satisfied
    How, in our means, we should advance ourselves
    To look with forehead bold and big enough
    Upon the power and puissance of the King.

2 I / 3
  • Shall we go draw our numbers, and set on?
  • Shall we go draw our numbers, and set on?
  • Archbishop Scroop. Let us on,
    And publish the occasion of our arms.
    The commonwealth is sick of their own choice;
    Their over-greedy love hath surfeited.
    An habitation giddy and unsure
    Hath he that buildeth on the vulgar heart.
    O thou fond many, with what loud applause
    Didst thou beat heaven with blessing Bolingbroke
    Before he was what thou wouldst have him be!
    And being now trimm'd in thine own desires,
    Thou, beastly feeder, art so full of him
    That thou provok'st thyself to cast him up.
    So, so, thou common dog, didst thou disgorge
    Thy glutton bosom of the royal Richard;
    And now thou wouldst eat thy dead vomit up,
    And howl'st to find it. What trust is in these times?
    They that, when Richard liv'd, would have him die
    Are now become enamour'd on his grave.
    Thou that threw'st dust upon his goodly head,
    When through proud London he came sighing on
    After th' admired heels of Bolingbroke,
    Criest now 'O earth, yield us that king again,
    And take thou this!' O thoughts of men accurs'd!
    Past and to come seems best; things present, worst.

    Lord Mowbray. Shall we go draw our numbers, and set on?

3 IV / 1
  • Thus do the hopes we have in him touch ground
    And dash themselves to pieces....
  • Thus do the hopes we have in him touch ground
    And dash themselves to pieces.
  • Archbishop Scroop. 'Tis well done.
    My friends and brethren in these great affairs,
    I must acquaint you that I have receiv'd
    New-dated letters from Northumberland;
    Their cold intent, tenour, and substance, thus:
    Here doth he wish his person, with such powers
    As might hold sortance with his quality,
    The which he could not levy; whereupon
    He is retir'd, to ripe his growing fortunes,
    To Scotland; and concludes in hearty prayers
    That your attempts may overlive the hazard
    And fearful meeting of their opposite.

    Lord Mowbray. Thus do the hopes we have in him touch ground
    And dash themselves to pieces.

4 IV / 1
  • The just proportion that we gave them out.
    Let us sway on and face them in t...
  • The just proportion that we gave them out.
    Let us sway on and face them in the field.
  • Messenger. West of this forest, scarcely off a mile,
    In goodly form comes on the enemy;
    And, by the ground they hide, I judge their number
    Upon or near the rate of thirty thousand.

    Lord Mowbray. The just proportion that we gave them out.
    Let us sway on and face them in the field.

5 IV / 1
  • I think it is my Lord of Westmoreland.
  • I think it is my Lord of Westmoreland.
  • Archbishop Scroop. What well-appointed leader fronts us here?

    Lord Mowbray. I think it is my Lord of Westmoreland.

6 IV / 1
  • Why not to him in part, and to us all
    That feel the bruises of the days befo...
  • Why not to him in part, and to us all
    That feel the bruises of the days before,
    And suffer the condition of these times
    To lay a heavy and unequal hand
    Upon our honours?
  • Earl of Westmoreland. There is no need of any such redress;
    Or if there were, it not belongs to you.

    Lord Mowbray. Why not to him in part, and to us all
    That feel the bruises of the days before,
    And suffer the condition of these times
    To lay a heavy and unequal hand
    Upon our honours?

7 IV / 1
  • What thing, in honour, had my father lost
    That need to be reviv'd and breath...
  • What thing, in honour, had my father lost
    That need to be reviv'd and breath'd in me?
    The King that lov'd him, as the state stood then,
    Was force perforce compell'd to banish him,
    And then that Henry Bolingbroke and he,
    Being mounted and both roused in their seats,
    Their neighing coursers daring of the spur,
    Their armed staves in charge, their beavers down,
    Their eyes of fire sparkling through sights of steel,
    And the loud trumpet blowing them together--
    Then, then, when there was nothing could have stay'd
    My father from the breast of Bolingbroke,
    O, when the King did throw his warder down--
    His own life hung upon the staff he threw--
    Then threw he down himself, and all their lives
    That by indictment and by dint of sword
    Have since miscarried under Bolingbroke.
  • Earl of Westmoreland. O my good Lord Mowbray,
    Construe the times to their necessities,
    And you shall say, indeed, it is the time,
    And not the King, that doth you injuries.
    Yet, for your part, it not appears to me,
    Either from the King or in the present time,
    That you should have an inch of any ground
    To build a grief on. Were you not restor'd
    To all the Duke of Norfolk's signiories,
    Your noble and right well-rememb'red father's?

    Lord Mowbray. What thing, in honour, had my father lost
    That need to be reviv'd and breath'd in me?
    The King that lov'd him, as the state stood then,
    Was force perforce compell'd to banish him,
    And then that Henry Bolingbroke and he,
    Being mounted and both roused in their seats,
    Their neighing coursers daring of the spur,
    Their armed staves in charge, their beavers down,
    Their eyes of fire sparkling through sights of steel,
    And the loud trumpet blowing them together--
    Then, then, when there was nothing could have stay'd
    My father from the breast of Bolingbroke,
    O, when the King did throw his warder down--
    His own life hung upon the staff he threw--
    Then threw he down himself, and all their lives
    That by indictment and by dint of sword
    Have since miscarried under Bolingbroke.

8 IV / 1
  • But he hath forc'd us to compel this offer;
    And it proceeds from policy, not...
  • But he hath forc'd us to compel this offer;
    And it proceeds from policy, not love.
  • Earl of Westmoreland. You speak, Lord Mowbray, now you know not what.
    The Earl of Hereford was reputed then
    In England the most valiant gentleman.
    Who knows on whom fortune would then have smil'd?
    But if your father had been victor there,
    He ne'er had borne it out of Coventry;
    For all the country, in a general voice,
    Cried hate upon him; and all their prayers and love
    Were set on Hereford, whom they doted on,
    And bless'd and grac'd indeed more than the King.
    But this is mere digression from my purpose.
    Here come I from our princely general
    To know your griefs; to tell you from his Grace
    That he will give you audience; and wherein
    It shall appear that your demands are just,
    You shall enjoy them, everything set off
    That might so much as think you enemies.

    Lord Mowbray. But he hath forc'd us to compel this offer;
    And it proceeds from policy, not love.

9 IV / 1
  • Well, by my will we shall admit no parley.
  • Well, by my will we shall admit no parley.
  • Earl of Westmoreland. Mowbray. you overween to take it so.
    This offer comes from mercy, not from fear;
    For, lo! within a ken our army lies-
    Upon mine honour, all too confident
    To give admittance to a thought of fear.
    Our battle is more full of names than yours,
    Our men more perfect in the use of arms,
    Our armour all as strong, our cause the best;
    Then reason will our hearts should be as good.
    Say you not, then, our offer is compell'd.

    Lord Mowbray. Well, by my will we shall admit no parley.

10 IV / 1
  • There is a thing within my bosom tells me
    That no conditions of our peace ca...
  • There is a thing within my bosom tells me
    That no conditions of our peace can stand.
  • Archbishop Scroop. My lord, we will do so. Exit WESTMORELAND

    Lord Mowbray. There is a thing within my bosom tells me
    That no conditions of our peace can stand.

11 IV / 1
  • Yea, but our valuation shall be such
    That every slight and false-derived cau...
  • Yea, but our valuation shall be such
    That every slight and false-derived cause,
    Yea, every idle, nice, and wanton reason,
    Shall to the King taste of this action;
    That, were our royal faiths martyrs in love,
    We shall be winnow'd with so rough a wind
    That even our corn shall seem as light as chaff,
    And good from bad find no partition.
  • Lord Hastings. Fear you not that: if we can make our peace
    Upon such large terms and so absolute
    As our conditions shall consist upon,
    Our peace shall stand as firm as rocky mountains.

    Lord Mowbray. Yea, but our valuation shall be such
    That every slight and false-derived cause,
    Yea, every idle, nice, and wanton reason,
    Shall to the King taste of this action;
    That, were our royal faiths martyrs in love,
    We shall be winnow'd with so rough a wind
    That even our corn shall seem as light as chaff,
    And good from bad find no partition.

12 IV / 1
  • Be it so.
    Here is return'd my Lord of Westmoreland.
  • Be it so.
    Here is return'd my Lord of Westmoreland.
  • Archbishop Scroop. 'Tis very true;
    And therefore be assur'd, my good Lord Marshal,
    If we do now make our atonement well,
    Our peace will, like a broken limb united,
    Grow stronger for the breaking.

    Lord Mowbray. Be it so.
    Here is return'd my Lord of Westmoreland.

13 IV / 1
  • Your Grace of York, in God's name then, set forward.
  • Your Grace of York, in God's name then, set forward.
  • Earl of Westmoreland. The Prince is here at hand. Pleaseth your
    To meet his Grace just distance 'tween our armies?

    Lord Mowbray. Your Grace of York, in God's name then, set forward.

14 IV / 2
  • If not, we ready are to try our fortunes
    To the last man.
  • If not, we ready are to try our fortunes
    To the last man.
  • Archbishop Scroop. Good my Lord of Lancaster,
    I am not here against your father's peace;
    But, as I told my Lord of Westmoreland,
    The time misord'red doth, in common sense,
    Crowd us and crush us to this monstrous form
    To hold our safety up. I sent your Grace
    The parcels and particulars of our grief,
    The which hath been with scorn shov'd from the court,
    Whereon this hydra son of war is born;
    Whose dangerous eyes may well be charm'd asleep
    With grant of our most just and right desires;
    And true obedience, of this madness cur'd,
    Stoop tamely to the foot of majesty.

    Lord Mowbray. If not, we ready are to try our fortunes
    To the last man.

15 IV / 2
  • You wish me health in very happy season,
    For I am on the sudden something il...
  • You wish me health in very happy season,
    For I am on the sudden something ill.
  • Earl of Westmoreland. I am glad of it.
    Health to my lord and gentle cousin, Mowbray.

    Lord Mowbray. You wish me health in very happy season,
    For I am on the sudden something ill.

16 IV / 2
  • So much the worse, if your own rule be true.
  • So much the worse, if your own rule be true.
  • Archbishop Scroop. Believe me, I am passing light in spirit.

    Lord Mowbray. So much the worse, if your own rule be true.

17 IV / 2
  • This had been cheerful after victory.
  • This had been cheerful after victory.
  • Prince John. The word of peace is rend'red. Hark, how they

    Lord Mowbray. This had been cheerful after victory.

18 IV / 2
  • Is this proceeding just and honourable?
  • Is this proceeding just and honourable?
  • Earl of Westmoreland. Good tidings, my Lord Hastings; for the which
    I do arrest thee, traitor, of high treason;
    And you, Lord Archbishop, and you, Lord Mowbray,
    Of capital treason I attach you both.

    Lord Mowbray. Is this proceeding just and honourable?

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.